Showing posts with label Tom Toles. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Tom Toles. Show all posts

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Tonight: Apocalyptoon 2012 opening party

APOCALYPTOON 2012

In Partnership with Art Soiree

THU JAN 26 - SUN JAN 29
$25 ticketed opening party on Jan 26 / On view for free Jan 27-29
Terrace Gallery

Ticketed opening party: Thu Jan 26 / 6pm / $25

Against the backdrop of a region steeped in politics and with a touch of art, style and humor, Art Soiree will unveil what 2012 will bring by presenting a unique pop-up exhibition that takes a humorous outlook on the year to come and features works, some created exclusively for this exhibition, by renowned editorial and political cartoonists. ApocalypToon 2012 features works, some of which were created exclusively for this exhibition, by cartoonists such as Kal of The Economist, Tom Toles of The Washington Post, Jeff Danziger (Los Angeles Times, Huffington Post), Daryl Cagle of MSNBC, Matt Wuerker of Politico, Damien Glez (La Monde, Courrier International, La Gazette) and Dan Piraro of Bizzaro. These simple pen stroke political cartoons foreshadow the future, poke fun at the past and imply hidden motives in ways that elude written or spoken reporting. The result of this creative license is a unique perspective on the future—entertaining, clever and insightful.

ApocolypToon kicks off with a $25 ticketed opening party on Thursday, January 26 at 6pm where guests can mingle with exhibiting cartoonists and enjoy complimentary food, live music and a cash bar. The pop-up exhibition in Artisphere's Terrace Gallery is free and open to the public from Friday, January 27 to Sunday, January 29.

Continuing with the zany nature of the cartoons, the ticketed party on January 26 celebrates the opening of the exhibit with live music from local journo-band Suspicious Package, comprised of reporters armed with their musical talent and rock star looks. The contents of the Suspicious Package are: Pulitzer Prize-winning Editorial Cartoonist at The Washington Post Tom Toles, Deputy Assistant U.S. Trade Representative Dr. Christina Sevilla, Deputy Assistant Secretary of HUD Bryan Greene, former TIME/Bloomberg correspondent and journalist Tim Berger and Director of Education and Outreach for the National Security Journalism Initiative at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism, Josh Meyer.

The opening party will also feature the sounds of DJ Neekola, international DC-based female DJ and producer, who will perform along with live percussionist Kamajian. In addition, the party includes a special guest performance by DJ Manifesto, an all-time DC favorite who both DJs and plays violin during his sets.

ApocalypToon 2012 is part of Notasphere, a month of programming created by local artistic collaborators. From a pop-up restaurant and political cartoons to Brazilian beats, Artisphere will be filled with fresh, thought-provoking off-beat arts events presented by creative partners from across the DC-region throughout January 2012.

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Jan 26: APOCALYPTOON 2012 exhibit at Artisphere

APOCALYPTOON 2012

In Partnership with Art Soiree

THU JAN 26 - SUN JAN 29
$25 ticketed opening party on Jan 26 / On view for free Jan 27-29
Terrace Gallery

Ticketed opening party: Thu Jan 26 / 6pm / $25

Against the backdrop of a region steeped in politics and with a touch of art, style and humor, Art Soiree will unveil what 2012 will bring by presenting a unique pop-up exhibition that takes a humorous outlook on the year to come and features works, some created exclusively for this exhibition, by renowned editorial and political cartoonists. ApocalypToon 2012 features works, some of which were created exclusively for this exhibition, by cartoonists such as Kal of The Economist, Tom Toles of The Washington Post, Jeff Danziger (Los Angeles Times, Huffington Post), Daryl Cagle of MSNBC, Matt Wuerker of Politico, Damien Glez (La Monde, Courrier International, La Gazette) and Dan Piraro of Bizzaro. These simple pen stroke political cartoons foreshadow the future, poke fun at the past and imply hidden motives in ways that elude written or spoken reporting. The result of this creative license is a unique perspective on the future—entertaining, clever and insightful.

ApocolypToon kicks off with a $25 ticketed opening party on Thursday, January 26 at 6pm where guests can mingle with exhibiting cartoonists and enjoy complimentary food, live music and a cash bar. The pop-up exhibition in Artisphere's Terrace Gallery is free and open to the public from Friday, January 27 to Sunday, January 29.

Continuing with the zany nature of the cartoons, the ticketed party on January 26 celebrates the opening of the exhibit with live music from local journo-band Suspicious Package, comprised of reporters armed with their musical talent and rock star looks. The contents of the Suspicious Package are: Pulitzer Prize-winning Editorial Cartoonist at The Washington Post Tom Toles, Deputy Assistant U.S. Trade Representative Dr. Christina Sevilla, Deputy Assistant Secretary of HUD Bryan Greene, former TIME/Bloomberg correspondent and journalist Tim Berger and Director of Education and Outreach for the National Security Journalism Initiative at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism, Josh Meyer.

The opening party will also feature the sounds of DJ Neekola, international DC-based female DJ and producer, who will perform along with live percussionist Kamajian. In addition, the party includes a special guest performance by DJ Manifesto, an all-time DC favorite who both DJs and plays violin during his sets.

ApocalypToon 2012 is part of Notasphere, a month of programming created by local artistic collaborators. From a pop-up restaurant and political cartoons to Brazilian beats, Artisphere will be filled with fresh, thought-provoking off-beat arts events presented by creative partners from across the DC-region throughout January 2012.

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Toles wins another (UPDATED)

Tom Spurgeon reports that Tom Toles has won an Opinion Award from The Week, which may have put a video of the awards online, but definitely ran this article about his win.

The other cartoonists who were considered are Steve Breen, Mike Luckovich, Glenn McCoy and Rob Rogers. Sadly, I think the 5 might be 1/10th of the full-time editorial cartoonists working in newspapers.

Thursday, March 03, 2011

A little more on the Herblock Award, from two of the judges

Matt Wuerker, 2010's winner of the Herblock award, and Signe Wilkinson are the editorial cartoonists who were two of the three judges for the 2011 award. They've shared their thinking behind the selection of Tom Toles as the winner with us.

Judging the Herblock award this year was really, really hard.  There was too much good work in way too many inventive forms.  It's good news for our readers ... but hard for judges. Different judges would have ended up with a different decision.

In the spirit of transparency, we'd like to lift the veil a little on the thinking that went into our judging this year. Think of this as a little WikiLeak of what happened on the path to awarding the 2011 Herblock Prize.

Before the judging, it was agreed that this year the finalist would also be recognized.  We knew the job was to come up with two top cartoonists.

We had a great, broad sampling of political cartooning today: lots of traditional single-panel cartoons, plenty of stellar "altie" work, a number of great ventures into cartoon journalism and, of course, the animation submissions. We even had cartoons rendered with actual oil from the BP spill.

In the apples and oranges comparisons that are such a big part of the process, it was hard to measure the simple punchy genius of single panels by the likes of Pett and Britt against long-form docucomics that went beyond the headlines, like those submitted by Ohman, Wasserman and Varvel, or for that matter animated reporter's sketchbooks such as the engaging submission from Rex Babin.

Mike Thompson's finger on the pulse of Detroit crime and Bill Day's attention to child abuse were both powerful uses of our medium. For taking us where cartooning had not gone before, Ted Rall's enterprising trip to Afghanistan was particularly noteworthy.  Pat Bagley's wonderful loose humor and engagement with his readers made him a contender. The "Alties," led by Bors and Sorensen, all made it to the semifinal pile, as did Ramirez, whose graphic punch and strong, clearly expressed political opinions kept him in the running right up to the end.

We all agreed that, to the best of our abilities, we'd not judge according to our political bent but solely on the quality and consistency of the cartooning found in the portfolios we were looking at.

Though Matt Davies had what we all agreed was the single best cartoon of the year, "WikiLeaks" (by the way, a non-animated black-and-white single panel),  the quality and creativity of the Toles and Telnaes portfolios put them at the very top.  Choosing between the two was excruciating and took a while, but in the end we felt the overall consistency of Toles's complete portfolio made him the winner, with Telnaes No. 2 by a hair ... or a .3 Micron line.

---- Signe Wilkinson and Matt Wuerker

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Wash Post's Tom Toles Herblock Prize Winner 2011

According to Jennifer Lee of the Post, "Washington Post's Tom Toles is this year's winner of the Herblock Prize & Lecture for excellence in editorial cartooning: http://www.herbblockfoundation.org/herblock-prize-winner/737 "

 

Congratulations to Tom, and that's two Washington winners in a row, as Matt Wuerker took it last year.

 

 



Comic Riffs has additional details including noting that Ann Telnaes was a runner-up.

Monday, January 24, 2011

Toles played music over the weekend

Another 'for the record' blogpost -

Reporters rock the National Press Club
By: Nikki Schwab and Katy Adams
Washington Examiner January 24 2011

- someday you'll thank me.

Sunday, January 23, 2011

1 more day in Toles cartoon contest

The Post has joined the caption-writing contest world...

Readers will have a chance at writing a cartoon caption with The Washington Post's caption-writing contest with Tom Toles.

WashPost editorial Cartoonist Tom Toles sketched a State of the Union cartoon here, but there's no caption: http://voices.washingtonpost.com/tomtoles/2011/01/state_of_the_union_cartoon_cap.html

Readers can post their suggested caption(s) in the comments section until 11:59 p.m. ET Monday, Jan. 24. The winner gets a print of the cartoon, with their suggested caption, signed by Tom Toles. The winner will be announced before Obama begins his State of the Union address that Tuesday evening.

For official rules, go here: http://voices.washingtonpost.com/tomtoles/tom-toles-cartoon-caption-cont.html


Tuesday, January 18, 2011

PR: WashPost's Cartoon Caption Contest

The Post has joined the caption-writing contest world...

Readers will have a chance at writing a cartoon caption with The Washington Post's caption-writing contest with Tom Toles.

 

WashPost editorial Cartoonist Tom Toles sketched a State of the Union cartoon here, but there's no caption: http://voices.washingtonpost.com/tomtoles/2011/01/state_of_the_union_cartoon_cap.html

 

Readers can post their suggested caption(s) in the comments section until 11:59 p.m. ET Monday, Jan. 24. The winner gets a print of the cartoon, with their suggested caption, signed by Tom Toles. The winner will be announced before Obama begins his State of the Union address that Tuesday evening.

 

For official rules, go here: http://voices.washingtonpost.com/tomtoles/tom-toles-cartoon-caption-cont.html

 

Saturday, September 25, 2010

That darn Toles! (continued)

Witches are your neighbors and acquaintances

Washington Post Saturday, September 25, 2010; A11

What is a witch? The Tea Party's Senate candidate in Delaware, Christine O'Donnell, said that she dabbled in witchcraft. Post columnist Richard Cohen ["Republicans, bewitched," op-ed, Sept. 21] and cartoonist Tom Toles [Sept. 21] commented on it. I wonder if either knows what a witch is? Is it the Hollywood version from "Snow White" or "The Wizard of Oz?" If not, then what?

A witch could be standing in line behind you at the checkout counter or sitting next to you on the Metro. And he or she probably does not cackle or have a wart on her nose or carry a broom. There are several thousand of them in America. They are hard to tell from Episcopalians or anyone else.

If The Post is going to write about them, perhaps you should invite one or two to talk to your staff to provide some background and answer questions.

John B. Holway, Springfield

Monday, May 10, 2010

Post launches cartoon contest - updated

America's Next Great Cartoonist Contest. Enter now. Chance to win a one-month stint in the Washington Post Style section. Work for the man for free. No purchase necessary.

Our Man Thompson, who got paid for his Post Style cartoon appearances, is one of the judges, as is Garry "Greatest cartoonist of the 4th quarter of the 20th century" Trudeau, the Post's Gene Weingarten the latest person to break onto their comics page, and Tom "that darn" Toles as well as Stephan Pastis and Jerry Scott. Cavna's blog post on it is here and be sure to read the comments about legal concerns being raised.

I'm feeling slightly less cranky as I update this, so I will say it's a good opportunity for someone to break out of the syndication pack.

Tuesday, April 06, 2010

That darn Toles, continued even more

Ummmm, doesn't the idea of less guns = less gun crimes ever occur to anyone? On the other hand, I guess if one thinks that editorial cartoons shouldn't be propaganda, one lives in a different world than I do. They're editorializing after all.

Propagandist cartoon draws on the District's gun laws
Washington Post Tuesday, April 6, 2010; A12

The April 1 editorial cartoon by Tom Toles seemed to imply that the 2008 Supreme Court ruling that forced the District to revamp its gun laws led to last week's shootings that left four people dead in Southeast Washington.

The only problem with Mr. Toles's blatant propaganda is that the still-restrictive gun laws make it impossible for law-abiding citizens to protect themselves. Does anyone think the suspects in the shootings owned guns legally?

Tom McAnear, Arlington