Tuesday, July 31, 2018

The Post on Woody's world

Aug 8-10: Library of Congress Presents “Anime for All”



 

Library of Congress logo

 
NEWS from the LIBRARY of CONGRESS

 

July 30, 2018  

 

Public Contact: Sasha Dowdy (202) 707-3173, aldo@loc.gov 
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov.

 

Library of Congress Presents "Anime for All"
East-Asian Culture, Mythology and Pop Culture on Display for Anime Fandoms

 

A display of Japanese woodblock prints and medieval picture scrolls, a family-friendly cosplay workshop and a free talk with famed Japanese writer and director Kihara Hirokatsu will highlight the Library of Congress' series of events being presented in conjunction with Otakon, Washington, D.C.'s annual convention celebrating Asian pop culture (anime, manga, music, movies, video games, etc.) and its fandom. 

"Anime for All," a celebration of east-Asian culture, mythology, pop culture and inspiration will be held Wednesday, Aug. 8 through Friday, Aug. 10 in the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First Street S.E., Washington D.C. The series of events will showcase Japanese storytelling traditions that have been transformed into modern day forms of art and will seek to illuminate how Japan's ancient history has played a significant role in pop-culture and how it continues to inspire creativity in the arts.

Events are free and open to the public. Tickets are available for some of the "Anime for All" activities, but are not required. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Visit this event ticketing site for more information and to secure your ticket. Entry is not guaranteed.

  Media wishing to cover the event must RSVP no later than Tuesday, Aug. 7. Additional details about coverage opportunities will follow.

Fans of anime, manga and Japanese pop culture have much to explore in the Library's collections. The Prints and Photographs division contains over 2,500 Japanese woodblock prints from the Edo Period through the 21st Century. The Asian Division's collection is the largest repository of Japanese language materials outside of Japan, totaling 1.2 million monograph volumes with a rare book collection exceeding 5,900 items, dating as far back as the 8th century. The Serials and Government Publications division houses over 140,000 comic books, including treasures such as the rare early English-language editions of "Astro Boy," "Macross," and "Ultraman."

The series will conclude on Saturday, Aug. 11 with a panel discussion featuring Library of Congress experts on various ways Otakon audiences can connect with the Library of Congress and its resources. The speakers will share some of the east-Asian treasures that are available on-site and online at the Library and how they can engage with these materials. The U.S. Copyright Office will provide information on how to create works inspired by our collection items without infringement and methods to protect intellectual property. An Otakon 2018 ticket is required for attendance. For more information on Otakon, visit this site.

 

The excitement can be followed on Twitter at @librarycongress.

 

The programming includes:

 

Wednesday, Aug. 8
11 a.m., Great Hall, first floor

Pop Up Performance 
Visitors are invited to stop in the Library's Great Hall for a performance from Japanese musical talents, The Washington Toho Koto Society. Tickets are available, but are not required. Visit this event ticketing site for more information. 

 

Thursday, Aug. 9
10 a.m. — 3:30 p.m., Whittall Pavilion, ground floor
"Anime for All" Display
This display will trace the history of Japanese graphic arts and storytelling into the modern day. Visitors will see examples of medieval picture scrolls, depicting legends of heroic monks and tales of anthropomorphic animals, that experts consider to be among the earliest examples of manga in history. Also on display are illustrations of yokai, supernatural monsters from Japanese folklore that inspire modern day creatures in manga and anime, and the woodcut figure of Hangaku Gozen, a historical woman warrior in full armor on a rearing horse. Fans of mecha will encounter the first English translations of "Robotech," and enjoy the manga adaptation of Ghibli Studios' "Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind." Visitors can also explore how graphically represented stories evolved from religious origins into popular tales of samurai heroism and, ultimately, the modern day renditions enjoyed around the globe. No tickets required. 

     

11 a.m. — 4 p.m., Young Readers Center, ground floor 
Cosplay Workshop
Cosplayers will demonstrate how they develop characters. Families are encouraged to come dressed as their favorite characters. Free and open to the public. No tickets required.   

 

11:30 a.m. — noon, Young Readers Center, ground floor 
Cosplay Demonstration 
Library of Congress Young Readers Center staff and cosplayers will give a demonstration on how to create a manga drawing. Families are encouraged to come dressed as their favorite characters. Free and open to the public. No tickets required.  
NOTE: Participants must comply with Cosplay & Costume Weapons Guidelines, below.

 

1 p.m., Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor  
Film Screening
"The Tale of Princess Kaguya," a film by Isao Takahata. This film is rated PG. 

 

5 p.m. — 6 p.m., Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor  
Kihara Hirokatsu, LIVE
Studio Ghibli writer, producer and director Kihara Hirokatsu will discuss his experience in Japanese anime production and the inspirations for his latest projects. Hirokatsu will give the talk in Japanese with an English interpreter. Free and open to the public. Tickets are available, but are not required. Visit this event ticketing site for more information. 

At sundown, north lawn of the Library's Thomas Jefferson Building                                       

Film Screening 
"Superman" (1978) (2017 National Film Registry)
Presented part of the Library's "LOC Summer Movies on the Lawn" series. Attendees are encouraged to dress in Superman cosplay. Tickets are available, but are not required. Visit this event ticketing site for more information. 

NOTE: Participants must comply with Cosplay & Costume Weapons Guidelines, below.

 

Friday, Aug. 10         

10:30 a.m. — 11:15 a.m., Young Readers Center, ground floor 

Japanese Story Time 
The Young Readers Center hosts story time for babies and toddlers about Japanese culture, featuring Japanese stories, music, and art. All children and teens under 16 years of age must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Space is limited and is available at first come, first served basis.

 

Saturday, Aug. 11 

2 p.m., Walter E. Washington Convention Center
Library of Congress at Otakon *

Join Library of Congress staff members for a panel discussion about the east-Asian collections held at the Library. Panelists will share highlights of the collections, provide insights on the how you can access the collection items and share how attendees can protect their intellectual property. 
* Otakon 2018 ticket required for attendance. 
For more information on Otakon, visit the site.

 

"Anime for All" is free programming presented by the Library of Congress. Those interested in supporting free programs at the Library can contact devofc@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world's largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States — and extensive materials from around the world — both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

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Cosplay and Costume Weapons Guidelines

The following guidelines of the U.S. Capitol Police will apply:

 

  • Weapons and replicas of weapons are generally prohibited on Capitol Grounds.  Participants should not attempt to enter any building on Capitol Grounds other than the specific event locations while in possession of a fake or "Costume Weapon."
  • Costume Weapons will be inspected by the U.S. Capitol Police prior to entry into any of the event locations.
  • For operational and security reasons, guests may not enter any of the event locations or pass through screening while wearing masks or with their faces covered in any way that would obscure identification.
  • Wearing masks on Capitol Grounds is permitted at the discretion of the United States Capitol Police. If directed, participants must immediately remove costume masks.

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PR 18-096
2018-07-30
ISSN 0731-3527

 

 

 


 

 
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Meet a Local Cartoonist: A Chat with Rachelle Holloway

by Mike Rhode

DC Zinefest 2018 recently had a successful day out at Art Enables on Rhode Island Ave. I met at least six cartoonists who were new to me, and said hi to at least three I already know. (My photos are here). Rachelle Holloway, an illustrator and cartoonist, is the first to answer our usual questions.
 
What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

I am currently a freelance illustrator for Mascot Books. I work on children's books and draw my own webcomic, A Little Dragon Trouble, on the side. When it comes to my own personal work, I love drawing fantasy and artwork with a Scandinavian feel to it.

How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

Most of my work is done using the computer. But I also enjoy using traditional pen and ink. Sometimes I get tired staring at the computer screen, so drawing traditionally can be relaxing. I love painting with gouache and watercolor, and I also enjoy cut paper art.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up on the West Coast, mainly in San Diego, California and Washington State. That's where I call home.


What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

In 2014, I graduated from Savannah College of Art and Design with a B.F.A in Animation. I mainly focused on 2D animation, but my primary focus and interest was Concept Art and Visual Development. I took one Sequential Art class while I was in college, but when it comes to comics, I am mostly self taught.

Who are your influences?

I have so many influences that I can't list them all. I find inspiration from everywhere and everyone! Here is a small list of people who influence my work: John Howe; John Bauer; Lorelay Bove; Brittney Lee

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

If I were granted a do-over, I may have studied Illustration or Graphic Design. I don't regret studying animation, in fact, it has helped me with the creative work I’m currently doing. But on the East Coast, I have discovered a lot of skills people are looking for in the creative industry are Typography, Web and Graphic design. But that hasn’t stopped me from pursuing that education. I just finished a Web Design class at Northern Virginia Community College, and am learning new skills to better myself as a creative professional.

What work are you best-known for?

I feel I am not really best-known for anything in particular yet. My Zine, My Dog is More Paranoid Than I Am, is my most popular comic. I'm also known for having a lot of Scandinavian/Viking artwork, which gets people’s attention.

What work are you most proud of?

I am personally most proud of my webcomic, A Little Dragon Trouble. For my Senior Film In college, I wasn't able to fully do what I wanted to do. So a few years later, I developed A Little Dragon Trouble. My webcomic has also helped me in so many other ways. It has helped me gain an audience. The visual development of the comic was recognized on Behance and featured on Small Press Expo's tumblr blog. It is because of this comic I am where I am today.

What would you like to do or work on in the future?

I would like to self publish my own picture book. After illustrating a kids book for an author, I was inspired to create a short story myself. I would love to have the time to illustrate and self-publish it. I also have many comic and story ideas written down, and would like to make them a reality.


What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

When I'm having writer’s block, I write down situations or events I don't want happening in my story. Sometimes it ends up being a good idea anyway. Another approach is don't think, just write! Even if you know it's bad. You can always go back and change it later.


What do you think will be the future of your field?

I definitely see myself continuing being an illustrator and getting more requests from authors. But, I hope one day to be employed in the animation industry. But in the meantime, freelance illustration is what's keeping me going!

What local cons do you attend besides DC Zinefest? The Small Press Expo, Intervention, or others? Any comments about attending them?

I just started tabling for the first time in 2017. DC Zinefest was the first event I tabled at. I also tabled at Richmond Zinefest last year. I would love to attend larger cons such as Small Press Expo, but I want to have more work under my belt before I do that. It is a goal I am striving for.

What's your favorite thing about DC?

I'm originally from the West Coast, so finding things to love about DC was a challenge when I first arrived. In 2016, I found out that DC has an amazingly open and welcoming sequential art culture. Everyone's work is so Indie and original, I love it! They are willing to express themselves and everyone supports each other. It's because of that culture I felt comfortable enough to start displaying my own work. DC has helped me grow as an artist, even though the artist culture is small. But that's what makes it so great!

How about a favorite local restaurant?

There's this wonderful place called the JINYA Ramen Bar in Fairfax, VA. I like to go there to celebrate the completion of large projects.

Do you have a website or blog?

http://rahcomics.tumblr.com/

https://www.instagram.com/rahcomics/

http://rachelleholloway.blogspot.com/ 

"A traditional ink trading card I sold at last years Richmond Zinefest."

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Aug 10: Animezing!: In This Corner of the World



Come to the JICC to enjoy a FREE animated Japanese film!
Come to the JICC to enjoy a FREE animated Japanese film!
JICC Logo
Animezing!: In This Corner of the World
Animezing!: In This Corner of the World
Winner of Animation of the Year (Japanese Academy) and the Jury Award (Annecy International Film Festival)
Torn apart by war. Brought together by love.
The award-winning story of In This Corner of the World follows a young lady named Suzu Urano, who in 1944 moves to the small town of Kure in Hiroshima to live with her husband's family. Suzu's life is thrown into chaos when her town is bombed during World War II. Her perseverance and courage underpin this heart-warming and inspirational tale of the everyday challenges faced by the Japanese in the midst of a violent, war-torn country. This beautiful yet poignant tale shows that even in the face of adversity and loss, people can come together and rebuild their lives.
In Japanese with English subtitles | Rated PG-13 | 129 min | 2016 | Directed by Sunao Katabuchi
Registration required
You are invited to
Friday, August 10th, 2018
from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
Event venue map
This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.
In the event of a cancellation, please contact us at jicc@ws.mofa.go.jp.

Program begins at 6:30PM.
Doors open 30 minutes before the program. No admittance after 7:00PM or once seating is full.

Registered guests will be seated on a first come, first served basis. Please note that seating is limited and registration does not guarantee a seat.

The JICC reserves the right to use any photograph/video taken at any event sponsored by JICC without the expressed written permission of those included within the photograph/video.
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© 1981-2018 Japan Information & Culture Center, Embassy of Japan







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Friday, July 27, 2018

Billy the Pop webcomic returns

Shamelessly reprinted from his newsletter, and I believe Cole is probably still Arlington's youngest regular cartoonist.

Billy the Pop


July 26th, 2018

Posted: 26 Jul 2018 01:12 PM PDT

Hello, everyone! Yes, it's true; I, indeed, still exist and am still drawing this comic strip. I'm dearly sorry for leaving for so long unannounced. The truth is, due to an abundance of things popping up for me to take care of (largely school and college-related) over the last 2.5 months, I haven't had the motivation I need to maintain a regular posting schedule, and unfortunately drawing Billy strips has fallen to the wayside for me. Don't worry, the strip isn't ending or anything. I still intend to draw and post Billy the Pop throughout this next school year. But I'm going to have to abandon the every-other-day posting schedule I've kept up since 2014. Now I'll be posting on a more when-I-am-able basis, although I'll try to publish at least once a week. I'm sorry to so drastically lower the output of strips like this, but I don't ever want this strip to become a chore for me, and I need to draw when I have the time and enthusiasm for it to make sure it's not a source of stress. I really appreciate y'all for sticking with the strip for this long regardless, and I'll try not to let you guys down!

In happier news, I've been working on putting together the second Billy the Pop book collection! It's going to contain more strips than the first, as well as some nice watercolor illustrations I've been making just for this. It should be available by the end of the summer, so get hyped!

Lastly, happy birthday to my dad and my brother, Leo!




Art Hondros' Legion of Condemned film graphic novel out now



If you don't see Art to buy it in person, you can buy it at http://www.blurb.com/b/8851717-the-legion-of-the-condemned

About the Book
A graphic novel adapted from a lost film from 1928, centered on a fighter pilot squadron in WWI France (fiction).

Author website


NPR on Teen Titans movie and Comicon's day 4

'Teen Titans GO! To The Movies': Joke! Gag! DC Films Aren't Just For Mopes Anymore!