Showing posts with label Library of Congress. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Library of Congress. Show all posts

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Sept 12: Box Brown speaks at Library of Congress at noon


Another comics picture from the Library of Congress

  • Title: [Child lying on floor with comic books]
  • Date Created/Published: [no date recorded on caption card]
  • Medium: 1 photographic print.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-59651 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Rights Advisory: Rights status not evaluated. For general information see "Copyright and Other Restrictions..." (http://lcweb.loc.gov/rr/print/195_copr.html).
  • Call Number: SSF - Comic books, strips, etc. [item] [P&P]
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
  • Notes:
    • Photo by Acme Newspictures
    • This record contains unverified, old data from caption card.
    • Caption card tracings: Photog. Index; Comic strips...; Children Reading; Shelf.

Tip from Sara Duke. Peter Sattler identified the comics as Captain Marvel Adventures #69; Action Comics 106 (March 1947 cover); Wonder Woman 21 (Jan/Feb 1947); Crack Comics #47 (the BEEZY story); Funny Folks #6 (Feb/Mar 1947); Flash Comics #8; and Jo-Jo Comics #5.

Monday, September 08, 2014

1942 photo of child reading Superman comics found in Library of Congress.

New York, N.Y. Children's Colony, a school for refugee children administered by a Viennese. German refugee child, a devotee of Superman

  • Title: New York, N.Y. Children's Colony, a school for refugee children administered by a Viennese. German refugee child, a devotee of Superman
  • Creator(s): Collins, Marjory, 1912-1985, photographer
  • Date Created/Published: 1942 October.
  • Medium: 1 photographic print.
  • Summary: Photograph shows a boy reading a Superman comic book.
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ds-04108 (digital file from original)
  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.
  • Call Number: FSA/OWI COLL - D 364 [item] [P&P]
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Thanks to Sara Duke for the tip. Craig Yoe identified it as Superman #19.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Batman 75th anniversary exhibit at Library of Congress


Megan Halsband of the Newspapers and Periodicals division has put up a small exhibit of Batman comic books in the Madison Building. Here are some pictures that she provided.




August 14: Civil War veterans Swann Lecture at Library of Congress

Free   and   Open   to   the   Public

Empty Sleeves and Bloody Shirts: Disabled Civil War Veterans and Presidential Campaigns, 1864-1880

An Illustrated Lecture by  Erin Corrales-Diaz
Swann Foundation Fellow, 2013-2014

Thursday, August 14, 2014, at 12 noon
In West Dining Room, Madison Building, 6th Floor
Sponsored by the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon
and the Prints & Photographs Division


Request ADA accommodation five days in advance at 202.707.6362 or ADA@loc.gov;  for additional information

Contact Martha Kennedy at mkenn@loc.gov or 202.707-9115

Friday, July 11, 2014

2014 National Book Festival comics guests

Comic bookers who will be guests at the 2014 Library of Congress National Book Festival on Aug. 30 include: Bryan Lee O'Malley, Jeff Smith, Raina Telegemeier, Gene Luen Yang, Jeffrey Brown, Jules Feiffer, Kyle Baker, Brian Biggs, Andrew Aydin and Rep. John Lewis.

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Jan 14: Kal at Library of Congress


Sara Duke reports, "Kevin Kallaugher talk about his most recent publication, Daggers Drawn, in the Pickford Theater (3rd floor, Madison Building) next Tuesday - January 14, at noon. For those of you who don't already have a copy of Daggers Drawn, the Library of Congress offers them at a discounted price. The Madison Building is located at 101 Independence Avenue, SE. The nearest Metro station is Capitol South. This event is free and open to the public."

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

The Economist Cartoonist Kevin Kallaugher to Discuss His New Book, Jan. 14



Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington DC   20540

January 7, 2014

Public contact: Center for the Book (202) 707-5221; cfbook@loc.gov
Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ada@loc.gov
The Economist's Cartoonist, Kevin Kallaugher, to Discuss and Sign His New Book
            "Daggers Drawn" Covers 35 Years of Cartoons in The Economist           
In his celebrated career with The Economist, Kevin "Kal" Kallaugher has created more than 4,000 editorial cartoons and 140 covers. His work has lampooned international leaders across the liberal-to-conservative spectrum, and his distinctive renderings are immediately recognizable as the work of this multitalented artist.
Kallaugher will discuss and sign his new book, "Daggers Drawn: 35 Years of Kal Cartoons in The Economist" (Chatsworth Press, 2013), on Tuesday, Jan. 14, at noon in the Pickford Theater, third floor, Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E. This Books & Beyond event, co-sponsored by the Library's Center for the Book and its Prints and Photographs Division, is free and open to the public; no tickets are required. 
This 196-page large-format book contains more than 300 of Kallaugher's award-winning works along with essays discussing his time with The Economist. In this book, Kallaugher has pointed his keen eye and sharp pen at important world events of the past 35 years. There are cartoons satirizing leaders from Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher to Barack Obama and Angela Merkel.
In addition to his longtime work for The Economist, Kallaugher is also a cartoonist for The Baltimore Sun. He also spent 10 years in London, drawing cartoons for The Observer, The Sunday Telegraph, Today and The Mail on Sunday. His work has been exhibited at the Walters Art Gallery in Baltimore, The Tate Gallery in London and the Library of Congress.
The Library's Center for the Book, established by Congress in 1977 to "stimulate public interest in books and reading," is a national force for reading and literacy promotion. A public-private partnership, it sponsors educational programs that reach readers of all ages through its affiliated state centers, through collaborations with nonprofit reading-promotion partners and through the Young Readers Center and the Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress. For more information, visit www.read.gov.
The Library of Congress, the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, holds more than 158 million items in various languages, disciplines and formats.  The Library serves the U.S. Congress and the nation both on-site in its reading rooms on Capitol Hill and through its award-winning website at www.loc.gov.
# # #
PR 14-04
1/7/14
ISSN 0731-3527

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Wow, the GPO has an interesting choice for a Christmas illustration

I'm a fan of their blog. I just wouldn't have chosen this illustration for an article about Christmas trees....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oh, say, can you tree? American Christmas tree traditions

by Michele Bartram, U.S. Government Online Bookstore
http://govbooktalk.gpo.gov/2013/12/17/oh-say-can-you-tree-american-christmas-tree-traditions/

As you can see, it's Uncle Sam and Columbia bringing the blessings of liberty to less-enlightened peoples in the wake of the Spanish-American War.  My guess is that it's a scan off the Library of Congress site. Yes, here it is, from 1899.

In the larger size reprinted here, you can see children in native garb representing their countries, with Puerto Rico receiving a book, Hawaii reaching out for something too, Samoa sucking on candy, and  Cuba and the Philippines getting a nice new plow. If it's not a justification of imperialism (although I think it is), it's certainly paternalism.

However, should you like to have this Keppler print for your own decorating, you can download a 140mb tif and print it out probably as big as a tree. It is a nice drawing.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Sept 13 at noon: Heidi MacDonald at Library of Congress

This is from Georgia Higley, in the Library's Serials Division:

Should you be in the DC area for the 2013 Small Press Expo, consider
visiting the Library of Congress a day earlier for a talk on Friday,
September 13:

Heidi MacDonald, creator of The Beat, a daily news blog about comics,
and former editor at DC Comics, will discuss "After Watchmen and Maus:
Exploring the Graphic Novel" at the second annual SPX talk sponsored
by the Serial & Government Publications Division.

We will also display some of our recently acquired SPX mini-comics
and selected works by Heidi MacDonald.

Please join us on Friday, September 13, at noon in the West Dining
Room, located on the 6th floor of the Madison Building, Library of
Congress, 101 Independence Ave, SE, Washington, DC.

The program is free and open to the public.

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Lecture by Heidi MacDonald on Friday, September 13 at the Library of Congress

This is from Georgia Higley, in the Library's Serials Division:

Should you be in the DC area for the 2013 Small Press Expo, consider
visiting the Library of Congress a day earlier for a talk on Friday,
September 13:

Heidi MacDonald, creator of The Beat, a daily news blog about comics,
and former editor at DC Comics, will discuss "After Watchmen and Maus:
Exploring the Graphic Novel" at the second annual SPX talk sponsored
by the Serial & Government Publications Division.

We will also display some of our recently acquired SPX mini-comics
and selected works by Heidi MacDonald.

Please join us on Friday, September 13, at noon in the West Dining
Room, located on the 6th floor of the Madison Building, Library of
Congress, 101 Independence Ave, SE, Washington, DC.

The program is free and open to the public.

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Gibson Girls exhibit review in today's Express

Dingfelder, Sadie.  2013.
A Belle Epoque Barbie: The Gibson Girl was a hottie who held her own with Kens.
[Washington Post] Express (June 27): E9
 

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

March 26: Comic Book Panel Discussion at Library of Congress



As always events are free and open to the public. The West Dining Room is on the 6th floor of the Madison Building near the yellow elevators. All inquiries should be directed to the John Kluge Center, 202-707-3302




Thursday, March 07, 2013

Steven Heller on Thomas Nast's murals, and the Library of Congress connection

Check out this excellent article on a failed project by Thomas Nast for a Th. Nast's Grand Caricaturama:



A Caricamural View of the American Civil War.

Steven Heller

The Daily Heller blog (March 7)

http://imprint.printmag.com/daily-heller/a-caricamural-view-of-the-american-civil-war/

In the article, Heller notes, "In 1950 five of the large (8' x 12') paintings were found in a barn in Morristown, New Jersey, where Nast had lived. They were acquired by Erwin Swann, founder of the Swann Foundation of Caricature and Cartoon dedicated to scholarship on comics and cartoons in all media."


DC-area cartoon types should recognize the name Swann - his collection is in the Library of Congress. Swann curator Martha Kennedy confirmed for me that the paintings are in the Library, albeit in off-site storage because they're so large. This search should pull up the catalogue records and hi-res scans of the five 8 x 11 1/2 feet images.  Martha also says that 2 more of the paintings survive in the northeast.



More on Wertham's collection at the Library of Congress

Comic books' real-life supervillain: psychiatrist Fredric Wertham
Carol L Tilley
Boing Boing Mar 4 2013
http://boingboing.net/2013/03/04/comic-books-real-life-superv.html

Friday, March 01, 2013

More cartoons on view at Library of Congress

Continuing our recent survey of the Library of Congress' cartoons on exhibit - the Civil War in America show has at least three cartoons in it. Although they appear to our eyes as political cartoons, these were published as stand-alone prints that one would buy to admire and look at frequently - almost the television of their day. Go see them in person to get a better view than these pictures taken without a flash.

101_5227

101_5237

101_5238

In the Words Like Sapphires: 100 Years of Hebraica at the Library of Congress, 1912–2012 exhibit, there's two original paintings by Arthur Szyk for playing cards.

101_5241

101_5242

Down to Earth: Herblock and Photographers Observe the Environment is only open for three more weeks.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

"The Gibson Girl's America: Drawings by Charles Dana Gibson" Exhibition Opens March 30


Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington DC   20540
February 26, 2013
Public contact:  Martha Kennedy (202) 707-9115, mkenn@loc.gov

"The Gibson Girl's America: Drawings by Charles Dana Gibson"
Exhibition Opens at Library of Congress on March 30
In the 1890s, illustrator Charles Dana Gibson created the "Gibson Girl," a vibrant, new feminine ideal—a young woman who pursued higher education, romance, marriage, physical well-being and individuality with unprecedented independence.  Until World War I, the Gibson Girl set the standard for beauty, fashion and manners.
The Library of Congress announces a new exhibition, "The Gibson Girl's America: Drawings by Charles Dana Gibson," which opens Saturday, March 30 in the Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground level of the Library's Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C., and runs through Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013.  The exhibition is free and open to the public from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday.
"The Gibson Girl's America" presents 24 works, primarily drawings.  The exhibition highlights the rise of the Gibson Girl from the 1890s through the first two decades of the 20th century.  It also illuminates how women's increasing presence in the public sphere contributed to the social fabric of turn-of-the-20th-century America.
The items on display trace the arc of the artist's career.  Gibson (1867-1944) came of age when women's roles were expanding and social mobility was increasing.  He trained at the Art Students League in New York City and also in Europe.  The artist created satirical illustrations based on his observations of upper-middle-class life for such mainstream magazines as Life, Collier's Weekly, Harper's Weekly, Scribner's and Century.
Through creation and development of the Gibson Girl, the artist, an acclaimed master of pen-and-ink drawings, experienced unrivaled professional and popular success. Gibson's skills and prolific output meshed with the high-volume demand at the time for magazine illustrations.  His bold style and virtuoso technique exerted enormous influence on his peers and succeeding generations of illustrators.
The exhibition will be organized into five sections: Creating an Ideal, The Gibson Girl as the "New Woman," Social Relations Between the Sexes, High Society Scenes and Political Cartoonist.  The exhibition presents a selection of Gibson's lesser-known political images, spotlighting the concerns he addressed in his later work.
The items in the exhibition are drawn from Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, which holds the premier public collection of original drawings by Gibson.
The Prints and Photographs Division also includes approximately 14.4 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day.  International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history.  For more information, visit www.loc.gov/rr/print/.
The Library of Congress, the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, holds more than 155 million items in various languages, disciplines and formats.  The Library serves the U.S. Congress and the nation both on-site in its reading rooms on Capitol Hill and through its award-winning website at www.loc.gov.
# # #
PR13-28
2/26/13
ISSN:  0731-3527