Showing posts with label Swann Fellowship. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Swann Fellowship. Show all posts

Monday, June 18, 2018

June 21: Library of Congress Swann Fellow's Lecture on U.S.-Mexican War "Villains to be Vanquished"

Art historian and current Swann Fellow Erika Pazian will discuss her research on imagery of the U.S. – Mexican War, --specifically how each side portrayed the other.

Her talk "Villains to be Vanquished: Envisioning the Enemy in the U.S. Mexican War, 1846-1848," will be at noon, June 21, in the West Dining Room, 6th floor, Madison Building, Library of Congress.



Thursday, March 07, 2013

Steven Heller on Thomas Nast's murals, and the Library of Congress connection

Check out this excellent article on a failed project by Thomas Nast for a Th. Nast's Grand Caricaturama:



A Caricamural View of the American Civil War.

Steven Heller

The Daily Heller blog (March 7)

http://imprint.printmag.com/daily-heller/a-caricamural-view-of-the-american-civil-war/

In the article, Heller notes, "In 1950 five of the large (8' x 12') paintings were found in a barn in Morristown, New Jersey, where Nast had lived. They were acquired by Erwin Swann, founder of the Swann Foundation of Caricature and Cartoon dedicated to scholarship on comics and cartoons in all media."


DC-area cartoon types should recognize the name Swann - his collection is in the Library of Congress. Swann curator Martha Kennedy confirmed for me that the paintings are in the Library, albeit in off-site storage because they're so large. This search should pull up the catalogue records and hi-res scans of the five 8 x 11 1/2 feet images.  Martha also says that 2 more of the paintings survive in the northeast.



Wednesday, March 28, 2012

March 29: How Early American Comic Strips Shed Light on the Nature of the Child

Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington DC 20540

March 6, 2012

Public contact: Martha Kennedy (202) 707-9115, mkenn@loc.gov

Swann Foundation Fellow Lara Saguisag to Discuss
How Early American Comic Strips Shed Light on the Nature of the Child

Swann Foundation Fellow Lara Saguisag, in a lecture at the Library of Congress, will examine how early 20th-century comic strips that featured child protagonists revealed the nature of the child during that era.

Saguisag will present "Sketching the 'Secret Tracts' of the Child's Mind: Theorizing Childhood in Early American Fantasy Strips, 1905-1914," at noon on Thursday, March 29, in Dining Room A on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Avenue S.E., Washington, D.C. The lecture is free and open to the public. No tickets are needed.

Saguisag will focus specifically on fantasy strips such as Winsor McCay's "Little Nemo in Slumberland" and Lyonel Feininger's "Wee Willie Winkie's World." These strips featured child characters who inhabited dream worlds and transformed their environments through their imaginations. According to Saguisag, central to these works is the idea that a child's perception and experience of the world was shaped by his/her proclivity for fantasy. This natural connection with fantasy, moreover, made the child a complex, sometimes inscrutable figure, one who was essentially different from an adult.

Comic strips that linked childhood and fantasy drew from and built on themes of late-19th and early-20th-century children's books such as Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," Robert Louis Stevenson's "A Child's Garden of Verses" and Frank L. Baum's "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz." Such literature portrayed and celebrated the child as a highly imaginative being who enters and sometimes creates fantasy worlds that an adult could not readily access.

According to Saguisag, during the same period, psychologists and practitioners associated with the Child Study Movement were also intrigued by what G. Stanley Hall termed the "secret tracts" of the child's mind. Many psychologists concluded that imaginative play and reverie were healthful childhood activities and advised parents to take an active role in cultivating the child's imagination. The intersection of children's literature and psychology encountered in early American "kid strips" helped perpetuate and naturalize the image of the imaginative child.

Born and raised in the Philippines, Saguisag completed an M.A. in Children's literature at Hollins University and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing at The New School. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Childhood Studies at Rutgers University-Camden, where she held a University Presidential Fellowship from 2007-2009.

This presentation is sponsored by the Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon of the Library of Congress and the Library's Prints & Photographs Division. The lecture is part of the foundation's continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The foundation strives to award one fellowship annually to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. Applications for the 2013-2014 academic year are due Feb. 15, 2013. More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation's website: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/ or by e-mailing swann@loc.gov.

# # #

PR12-48
3/6/12
ISSN: 0731-3527

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

March 29: Early Comics and the Nature of the Child Lecture

Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington DC   20540

March 6, 2012

Public contact:  Martha Kennedy (202) 707-9115, mkenn@loc.gov

 Swann Foundation Fellow Lara Saguisag to Discuss
How Early American Comic Strips Shed Light on the Nature of the Child

Swann Foundation Fellow Lara Saguisag, in a lecture at the Library of Congress, will examine how early 20th-century comic strips that featured child protagonists revealed the nature of the child during that era.

Saguisag will present "Sketching the 'Secret Tracts' of the Child's Mind: Theorizing Childhood in Early American Fantasy Strips, 1905-1914," at noon on Thursday, March 29, in Dining Room A on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Avenue S.E., Washington, D.C.  The lecture is free and open to the public.  No tickets are needed.

Saguisag will focus specifically on fantasy strips such as Winsor McCay's "Little Nemo in Slumberland" and Lyonel Feininger's "Wee Willie Winkie's World."  These strips featured child characters who inhabited dream worlds and transformed their environments through their imaginations.  According to Saguisag, central to these works is the idea that a child's perception and experience of the world was shaped by his/her proclivity for fantasy.  This natural connection with fantasy, moreover, made the child a complex, sometimes inscrutable figure, one who was essentially different from an adult.

Comic strips that linked childhood and fantasy drew from and built on themes of late-19th and early-20th-century children's books such as Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," Robert Louis Stevenson's "A Child's Garden of Verses" and Frank L. Baum's "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz."  Such literature portrayed and celebrated the child as a highly imaginative being who enters and sometimes creates fantasy worlds that an adult could not readily access.

According to Saguisag, during the same period, psychologists and practitioners associated with the Child Study Movement were also intrigued by what G. Stanley Hall termed the "secret tracts" of the child's mind.  Many psychologists concluded that imaginative play and reverie were healthful childhood activities and advised parents to take an active role in cultivating the child's imagination.  The intersection of children's literature and psychology encountered in early American "kid strips" helped perpetuate and naturalize the image of the imaginative child.

Born and raised in the Philippines, Saguisag completed an M.A. in Children's literature at Hollins University and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing at The New School. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Childhood Studies at Rutgers University-Camden, where she held a University Presidential Fellowship from 2007-2009. 

This presentation is sponsored by the Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon of the Library of Congress and the Library's Prints & Photographs Division.  The lecture is part of the foundation's continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world.  The foundation strives to award one fellowship annually to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon.  Applications for the 2013-2014 academic year are due Feb. 15, 2013.  More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation's website: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/ or by e-mailing swann@loc.gov.

# # #

PR12-48
3/6/12
ISSN: 0731-3527

Monday, May 24, 2010

June 1: Swann Fellow's lecture on Turkish cartoonists

From Martha Kennedy at the Library of Congress -

Swann Fellow Yasemin Gencer presents her public lecture, "Cartooning Progress: Secularism and Nationalism in the Early Turkish Republic (1922-28)" at noon on Tuesday, June 1, in Dining Room A on the sixth floor of the Madison Building.

Gencer will discuss how cartoons of this era had the power to create, shape and project a new Turkish national identity based on European models. She will look at cartoons that highlight reforms initiated during the early years of the Turkish Republic. In one such image, for example, an automobile made of Latin letters speeds past a camel composed of Arabic letters, demonstrating how the cartoonist combines text with visual metaphor to underscore the benefits of changing the official alphabet. Such cartoons from 1922-28 illustrate many reforms aimed at secularizing the nation.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

March 25: Library of Congress Swann talk on Nast

Coming up tomorrow!

Thomas Nast and French Art
The Topic of Swann Grantee’s Talk on March 25

Swann Foundation grantee Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire will present a lecture entitled, "The Artist as Translator: Thomas Nast and French Art,” Wednesday, March 25, 2009, at 12 noon, in the West Dining Room on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, DC.

In her illustrated talk, Delamaire will examine American cartoonist Thomas Nast’s appropriation of the visual language used in prints and photographs of grand manner and history paintings in his political cartoons of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. The analysis of Nast’s cartoons suggests that they functioned much like visual, cultural, and political translations of the era’s leading issues and articulated the cartoonist’s artistic identity.

Thomas Nast (1840-1902) began his career as a newspaper illustrator in the antebellum era for the growing illustrated press of the 1850s in New York. During the Civil War years, Nast developed a new style of large-scale cartoons that made extensive use of the visual vocabulary of old masters and contemporary French academic painters, particularly those whose works were reproduced in prints then being disseminated by the American branch of Goupil & Cie in New York. Nast referenced or alluded to specific French paintings as a means of capturing and engaging his viewers’ interest in major political developments of the day as seen in such cartoons as “Democracy” or “The Tammany Tiger Loose” (published respectively in Harper’s Weekly on November 11, 1865 and November 11, 1871). In so doing, Nast not only translated “facts into black and white,” as suggested by Clarence Cook (Putnam Magazine, July 1869), but also transformed history painting into a mass medium and appropriated the significance of foreign images into the American national or local political sphere.

Delamaire contends that looking closely at Nast’s cartoons demonstrates that the artist deliberately emphasized the discontinuity between the original painting and his final image in order to construct the cartoon’s underlying meaning. Nast’s translations of history paintings into cartoons can thus be seen to question the authority and priority commonly associated with the grand tradition of European history painting. Delamaire suggests that Nast’s appropriations reveal a shift from his role as a newspaper illustrator to that of a translator of fine art’s visual language mediating the political significance of foreign works of art widely
disseminated in print form to his American audience.

Delamaire is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at Columbia University. Her dissertation project entitled, “Art in Translation: Franco-American exchanges in the Civil War and Reconstruction Era,” has been awarded a Terra Foundation Pre-doctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution and a Swann Foundation grant. Her research interests focus on transnational exchanges in relation to the development of reproductive technology in nineteenth century visual culture, the international art market and the emerging apparatus of international exhibitions. She completed a Master’s Degree in Egyptian Archaeology. She has published several essays on the American perception of ancient Egypt, the 1867 Paris Exposition Universelle, and the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial International Exhibition.

This presentation is part of the Swann Foundation’s continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The Swann Foundation’s advisory board is composed of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members. The foundation strives to award one fellowship annually (with a stipend of up to $15,000) to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. Applications for the academic year 2009-2010 are due Feb. 15, 2010. More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swannhome or by emailing swann@loc.gov.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

March 25: Library of Congress Swann talk on Nast

Thomas Nast and French Art
The Topic of Swann Grantee’s Talk on March 25

Swann Foundation grantee Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire will present a lecture entitled, "The Artist as Translator: Thomas Nast and French Art,” Wednesday, March 25, 2009, at 12 noon, in the West Dining Room on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, DC.

In her illustrated talk, Delamaire will examine American cartoonist Thomas Nast’s appropriation of the visual language used in prints and photographs of grand manner and history paintings in his political cartoons of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. The analysis of Nast’s cartoons suggests that they functioned much like visual, cultural, and political translations of the era’s leading issues and articulated the cartoonist’s artistic identity.

Thomas Nast (1840-1902) began his career as a newspaper illustrator in the antebellum era for the growing illustrated press of the 1850s in New York. During the Civil War years, Nast developed a new style of large-scale cartoons that made extensive use of the visual vocabulary of old masters and contemporary French academic painters, particularly those whose works were reproduced in prints then being disseminated by the American branch of Goupil & Cie in New York. Nast referenced or alluded to specific French paintings as a means of capturing and engaging his viewers’ interest in major political developments of the day as seen in such cartoons as “Democracy” or “The Tammany Tiger Loose” (published respectively in Harper’s Weekly on November 11, 1865 and November 11, 1871). In so doing, Nast not only translated “facts into black and white,” as suggested by Clarence Cook (Putnam Magazine, July 1869), but also transformed history painting into a mass medium and appropriated the significance of foreign images into the American national or local political sphere.

Delamaire contends that looking closely at Nast’s cartoons demonstrates that the artist deliberately emphasized the discontinuity between the original painting and his final image in order to construct the cartoon’s underlying meaning. Nast’s translations of history paintings into cartoons can thus be seen to question the authority and priority commonly associated with the grand tradition of European history painting. Delamaire suggests that Nast’s appropriations reveal a shift from his role as a newspaper illustrator to that of a translator of fine art’s visual language mediating the political significance of foreign works of art widely
disseminated in print form to his American audience.

Delamaire is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at Columbia University. Her dissertation project entitled, “Art in Translation: Franco-American exchanges in the Civil War and Reconstruction Era,” has been awarded a Terra Foundation Pre-doctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution and a Swann Foundation grant. Her research interests focus on transnational exchanges in relation to the development of reproductive technology in nineteenth century visual culture, the international art market and the emerging apparatus of international exhibitions. She completed a Master’s Degree in Egyptian Archaeology. She has published several essays on the American perception of ancient Egypt, the 1867 Paris Exposition Universelle, and the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial International Exhibition.

This presentation is part of the Swann Foundation’s continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The Swann Foundation’s advisory board is composed of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members. The foundation strives to award one fellowship annually (with a stipend of up to $15,000) to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. Applications for the academic year 2009-2010 are due Feb. 15, 2010. More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swannhome or by emailing swann@loc.gov.

Friday, January 30, 2009

Swann Fellowship at Library of Congress deadline approaching

Feb. 13 is the deadline for receiving Swann Fellowship applications here at the Library. The Swann Foundation awards up to $15,000 annually to a qualified graduate student applicant (or smaller awards to several) to support scholarly work in caricature and cartoon. For guidelines and application forms, please see http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swann-fellow.html . Email swann@loc.gov if you have questions.


Martha H. Kennedy
Associate Curator, Popular & Applied Graphic Art
Prints and Photographs Division
Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington, DC 20540-4730
Ph.: 202/707-9115 Fax: 202/707-6647

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Library of Congress Swann Fellowship applications due next month

Feb. 13 is deadline to receive Swann Fellowship applications. Up to $15,000 is awarded annually to a qualified graduate student applicant or smaller award(s) to several to support scholarly research in caricature and cartoon by the Swann Foundation administered by the Library of Congress. For criteria, application forms, and list of funded projects, please see http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swannhome.html. Email swann@loc.gov if you have questions.

Martha H. Kennedy
Associate Curator, Popular & Applied Graphic Art
Prints and Photographs Division
Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington, DC 20540-4730
Ph.: 202/707-9115 Fax: 202/707-6647

Monday, November 17, 2008

Dec 8: Swann fellow speaks on Civil War prints

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

101 Independence Avenue SE
Washington DC 20540
Phone: (202) 707-2905
Fax: (202) 707-9199

November 17, 2008

Public contact: Martha Kennedy (202) 707-9115, mkenn@loc.gov

MAZIE HARRIS TO DISCUSS CIVIL WAR ERA CHROMOLITHOGRAPHS BY HENRY LOUIS STEPHENS AT LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, DEC. 8


Swann Foundation grantee Mazie Harris, in a lecture at the Library of Congress, will discuss the Civil War Era chromolithographs by Henry Louis Stephens, the primary illustrator for the satirical New York journal Vanity Fair.

Harris will present the lecture, “A Colorful Union: The Development of Union Patriotism in Henry Louis Stephens’ 1863 Chromolithographs,” at noon on Monday, Dec. 8, in Dining Room A on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, DC.

In her illustrated talk, Harris will describe her research on the work of Stephens (1824-1882), a caricaturist as well as illustrator. She will draw on examples of his imagery from works held in the Library’s Marian S. Carson Collection and other source material in the Prints and Photographs Division.

The Emancipation Proclamation compelled Stephens to reconsider his previously virulently anti-abolitionist propaganda, according to Harris. In her talk, she will contend that after Abraham Lincoln’s groundbreaking executive orders in 1862 and 1863, Stephens deployed color printing and caricature in an attempt to reformulate views of race relations in the North and mobilize military enlistment.

Harris will analyze Stephens’ visual narratives by considering hand-written directions to the printer that the illustrator scrawled on the margins of each sketch for the series. These technical notes on color, which could be regarded simply as artistic instructions, when carefully examined and assessed, make explicit the particular political ideology of the prints.

Harris is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University. She completed an M.A. in art history from Boston University, and became interested in the work of Henry Louis Stephens while working as a curatorial assistant in the Agnes Mongan Center for the Study of Prints, Drawings and Photographs in Harvard University’s Fogg Art Museum.

This presentation is part of continuing activities of the Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The foundation is overseen by an advisory board composed of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members.

The foundation strives to award one fellowship annually (with a stipend of up to $15,000) to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. For 2008-2009, because of an unusually large number of strong applications, the foundation’s advisory board chose to support five applicants with smaller awards instead of selecting a single recipient of the fellowship.

Applications for the academic year 2009-2010 are due Feb. 13, 2009. For more information about the fellowship, visit www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swannhome/ or email swann@loc.gov.

# # #

PR08-216
11/17/08
ISSN: 0731-3527

Thursday, October 02, 2008

SWANN FOUNDATION ACCEPTING FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Public Affairs Office
101 Independence Ave., S.E.
Washington, D.C. 20540-1400
Voice: 202.707.2905
Fax: 202.707.9199

October 2, 2008

Press contact: Donna Urschel (202) 707-1639, durschel@loc.gov
Public contact: Martha Kennedy (202) 707-9115

SWANN FOUNDATION ACCEPTING FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS
Foundation Supports Research in the Humorous Arts of Caricature and Cartoon

The Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon, administered by the Library of Congress, is accepting applications for its graduate fellowship for the 2009-2010 academic year. Applications are due by close of business on Friday, Feb. 13, 2009, and notification will occur in the spring.

The Swann Foundation seeks to award one fellowship annually (with a stipend of up to $15,000) to assist in continuing scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. Depending on the number and quality of proposals, the advisory board may elect to make multiple, smaller awards.

A fellow is required to be in residence in Washington, D.C., for a minimum of two weeks, use the Library’s extensive collections and deliver a public lecture at the Library on his or her work. Each fellow must also provide a copy of his or her dissertation, thesis or postgraduate publication upon completion, for the Swann Foundation Fund files.

Guidelines and application forms are available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swann-fellow.html, by e-mailing swann@loc.gov or by calling Martha Kennedy in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library at (202) 707-9115.

To be eligible, an applicant must be a resident of the United States and a candidate for a master’s or doctoral degree at a university based in the United States, Canada or Mexico. The applicant must be working toward completion of a dissertation or thesis for that degree or be engaged in postgraduate research within three years of receiving an M.A. or a Ph.D. Individuals who are not U.S. residents but who otherwise meet these academic qualifications may also apply and be considered for a fellowship, contingent upon their visa eligibility.

The applicant’s research must be in the field of caricature and cartoon. There are no restrictions on the place or time period covered. To encourage research in a variety of academic disciplines, any university department may oversee a project proposed for the fellowship, provided the subject pertains to caricature or cartoon art.

Requirements for the fellowship applications include a statement of qualifications, a one-page abstract of the proposed project, a project description that specifies research needs and a budget, two letters of reference and official transcripts.

The Swann Foundation Fellowship in Caricature and Cartoon is one of a small number of scholarly fellowships that provide direct support for continuing graduate research in the field. It has supported groundbreaking research on caricature and cartoon that focuses on a variety of subjects and topics such as the Cold War; representations of race, class conflict and disease; and the early origins of caricature and political satire, and the cultural and social forces that have influenced the development of prominent cartoonists’ work. For a list of research projects, visit www.loc.gov/rr/rint/swann/swann-fellowslist.html.

The Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon is overseen by an advisory board composed of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members. The foundation’s activities support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. New York advertising executive Erwin Swann (1906-1973) established the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon in 1967.

# # #

PR08-183
10/2/08
ISSN: 0731-3527

Monday, June 30, 2008

SWANN FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES AWARDS FOR 2008‑2009

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
June 30, 2008

Press contact: Donna Urschel (202) 707-1639, durschel@loc.gov
Public contact: Martha Kennedy (202) 707-9115, mkenn@loc.gov

SWANN FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES AWARDS FOR 2008‑2009

The Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon, administered by the Library of Congress, announces the awarding of academic grants to five applicants for the 2008-2009 Swann Fellowship: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire, Mazie Harris, Jared Richman, Christina Smylitopoulos and Veronica White.

Because of an unusually large number of strong applications, the foundation’s advisory board chose to support five applicants with smaller awards instead of selecting a single recipient of the fellowship.

Delamaire, a doctoral candidate in art history and archaeology at Columbia University, will receive an award of $3,000 to support her research on the influence of French academic painting traditions on the work of Thomas Nast, a predominant American political cartoonist in the second half of the 19th century. In her dissertation, titled “Transatlantic Encounters: Franco-American Exchanges in the Civil War and Reconstruction Era,” she will contend that Nast, who collected prints of paintings by such artists as Paul Delaroche and Jean Léon Gérôme, used pictorial and technical conventions that characterize these and other French artists’ work in his compositions.

Harris, a doctoral candidate in the history of art at Brown University, will receive $3,500 for research for her dissertation titled, “A Colorful Union: Patriotic Caricature and Characterization in Henry Louis Stephens’ Civil War Chromolithographs.” In her study of this underappreciated graphic artist, she will analyze the vacillation between caricature and characterization in Stephens’ two chromolithographic series, published in 1863, and clarify his struggle to portray race relations as a motivation for the Union cause.

Richman will receive $2,000 for research into political caricature as part of the visual culture that shaped popular attitudes toward America during the Romantic Era. He plans to study prints in the Library’s collection of British satires to illuminate the conceptual treatment of America during the period before, during and after the Revolutionary War. Analysis of this material will inform a key part of his dissertation titled “Transatlantic Realms: The Idea of America in the British Literary Imagination.” Richman is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English at the University of Pennsylvania.

Smylitopoulos, a doctoral candidate in art history and communication studies at McGill University, will receive $3,000 to support her research for her dissertation titled “A Nabob’s Progress: Graphic Satire, The Grand Master and British Excess, 1770-1830.” She intends to strengthen the broad art historical context for the figure of the nabob (a provincial governor in the Mogul empire in India, also often a person of great wealth or prominence) by conducting research in the Library’s outstanding holdings of British satires in the Prints and Photographs Division.

White, who will soon complete her doctorate in art history at Columbia University, will receive $2,000 to help underwrite work on postdoctoral research. Embarking on a new project titled, “Dangerous Domestics: Satirical Depiction of Wives in English Prints from 1745 to 1821,” she intends to identify and analyze the varied artistic treatments of married women during the Golden Age of British Satire through exploring the Library’s collection.

New York advertising executive Erwin Swann (1906‑1973) established the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon in 1967. An avid collector, Swann assembled a large group of original drawings by more than 500 artists, spanning two centuries, which his estate bequeathed to the Library of Congress in the 1970s. Swann’ s original purpose was to build a collection of original drawings by significant creators of humorous and satiric art and to encourage the study of original cartoon and caricature drawings as works of art.

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PR08-122

6/30/08

ISSN: 0731-3527

Wednesday, March 19, 2008

Ellen Berg's Miss Columbia research

Ellen Berg is one of the Library of Congress's Swann Fellows this year and spoke there recently on her research on the missing Miss Columbia. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette interviewed her about her project as well as other political icons.

Thursday, February 28, 2008

March 18: CARTOONS BY MODERNIST PAINTER AD REINHARDT

CARTOONS BY MODERNIST PAINTER AD REINHARDT DISCUSSED AT LIBRARY OF CONGRESS ON MARCH 18

During World War II, American abstract expressionist painter Ad Reinhardt made a series of little-known but striking cartoon collages of Adolf Hitler. Reinhardt’s overlooked cartoon work will be discussed by Swann Foundation Fellow Prudence Peiffer in a lecture at the Library of Congress on March 18.

Peiffer’s presentation, “How to Look at Ad Reinhardt’s World War II Cartoons in America,” will begin at noon on Tuesday, March 18, in Dining Room A on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, D.C. The event is free and open to the public; no reservations are required.

The illustrated talk is based on research conducted by Peiffer at the Library of Congress during her fellowship, which was awarded last year by the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon. The lecture is sponsored by the foundation, which is managed by the Library, and the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division.

The cartoon collages by Reinhardt (1913-1967) were published during World War II in The New Masses journal and PM newspaper. By 1946, he had honed his collage technique in his “How to Look at Modern Art” cartoons.

In her talk, Peiffer will explore how Reinhardt mined the history of political cartoons to create his own unique strategy of radical aesthetics, and she will argue for a connection between his best-known abstract paintings from the 1950s and 1960s and his earlier cartoon work. She will draw upon examples of Reinhardt’s published cartoon creations and drawings by such cartoonists as Miguel Covarrubias (1904-1957), whose work influenced the younger artist.

In addition to being a Swann fellow at the Library of Congress, Peiffer is a pre-doctoral fellow at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C. She is a doctoral candidate in 20th-century art history at Harvard University and is writing her dissertation titled “Routine Extremism: Ad Reinhardt and Modern Art.” Peiffer completed a master’s degree in the history of art and architecture at Harvard and a bachelor’s in art history at Yale University. Her particular interest is in the intersections between abstraction and figuration in 20th-century art.

Peiffer’s presentation is part of the Swann Foundation’s continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The foundation’s advisory board is made up of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members.

The Swann Foundation customarily awards one fellowship annually (with a stipend of $15,000) to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/ or by e-mailing swann@loc.gov.

# # #

PR08-42

2/28/08

ISSN: 0731-3527

Friday, February 01, 2008

Swann fellowship applications due in two weeks

Swann fellowship applications are due very soon, Friday, February 15, 2008. One of the few fellowships in the field, this $15,000 award supports scholarly research in caricature and cartoon. Applicants must be enrolled in an M.A. or Ph.D program in a university in the U.S., Canada, or Mexico. Access guidelines and application at:

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swann-fellow.html

Email swann@loc.gov or call 202/707-9115 with questions.

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Feb 15: Swann Fellowship in Caricature and Cartoon

Applications for the Swann Fellowship in Caricature and Cartoon are due next month, Feb. 15, 2008. Guidelines and application for this annual award of $15,000 can be accessed at:
http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swann-fellow.html
Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited M.A. or Ph.D program in a university in the U.S., Canada or Mexico. Contact Martha Kennedy with questions at 202/707-9115 or email swann@loc.gov


Martha H. Kennedy
Assistant Curator, Popular and Applied Graphic Art
Prints and Photographs Division
Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington, DC 20540-4730
tel.: 202/707-9115; fax: 202/707-6647

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Feb 15: Swann Fellowship in Caricature and Cartoon

Applications for the Swann Fellowship in Caricature and Cartoon are due Feb. 15, 2008. The Swann Foundation makes an annual award of up to $15,000 to support scholarly graduate research in caricature and cartoon. Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited M.A. or Ph.D program in a university in the U.S., Canada, or Mexico. Access guidelines and application at:
http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swann-fellow.html
Contact Martha Kennedy with questions at 202/707-9115 or email swann@loc.gov

Martha H. Kennedy
Assistant Curator, Popular and Applied Graphic Art
Prints and Photographs Division
Library of Congress

Tuesday, September 25, 2007

SWANN FOUNDATION ACCEPTING FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
101 Independence Avenue SE
Washington DC 20540

September 25, 2007

Public contact: Martha Kennedy (202) 707-9115


SWANN FOUNDATION ACCEPTING FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS
Foundation Supports Research in the Humorous Arts of Caricature and Cartoon

The Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon, administered by the Library of Congress, is accepting applications for its graduate fellowship for the 2008-2009 academic year. Applications are due by close of business on Friday, Feb. 15, 2008, and notification will occur in the spring.

The Swann Foundation seeks to award one fellowship annually (with a stipend of up to $15,000) to assist in continuing scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon.

A fellow is required to be in residence in Washington, D.C., for a minimum of two weeks, use the Library’s extensive collections and deliver a public lecture at the Library on his or her work. Each fellow must also provide a copy of his or her dissertation, thesis or postgraduate publication upon completion, for the Swann Foundation Fund files.

Guidelines and application forms are available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swann-fellow.html, by e-mailing swann@loc.gov or by calling Martha Kennedy in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library at (202) 707-9115.

To be eligible, an applicant must be a resident of the United States and a candidate for a master’s or doctoral degree at a university based in the United States, Canada or Mexico. The applicant must be working toward completion of a dissertation or thesis for that degree or be engaged in postgraduate research within three years of receiving an M.A. or a Ph.D. Individuals who are not U.S. residents but who otherwise meet these academic qualifications may also apply and be considered for a fellowship, contingent upon their visa eligibility.

The applicant’s research must be in the field of caricature and cartoon. There are no restrictions on the place or time period covered. To encourage research in a variety of academic disciplines, any university department may oversee a project proposed for the fellowship, provided the subject pertains to caricature or cartoon art.

Requirements for the fellowship applications include a statement of qualifications, a one-page abstract of the proposed project, a project description that specifies research needs and a budget, two letters of reference and official transcripts.

The Swann Foundation fellowship in caricature and cartoon is the only scholarly fellowship that provides direct support for continuing graduate research in the field. It has supported groundbreaking research on caricature and cartoon that focuses on a variety of subjects and topics such as the Cold War; representations of race, class conflict and disease; and the early origins of caricature and political satire, and the cultural and social forces that have influenced the development of prominent cartoonists’ work. For a list of research projects, visit www.loc.gov/rr/rint/swann/swann-fellowslist.html.

The Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon is overseen by an advisory board composed of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members. The foundation’s activities support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. New York advertising executive Erwin Swann (1906-1973) established the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon in 1967.

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PR07-189
9/25/07
ISSN: 0731-3527