Showing posts with label Carla Speed McNeil. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Carla Speed McNeil. Show all posts

Thursday, January 19, 2017

"The idea was always to go up to the Revolution": Jason Rodriguez speaks about his second Colonial Comics book



by Mike Rhode

The second book in the historical non-fiction short story anthology Colonial Comics was released this week. I met with editor Jason Rodriguez at Lost Dog Café in South Arlington and we chatted a bit about putting both books together. I hadn't gotten a copy yet, so the discussion is a bit abstract regarding the second volume, but hopefully our talk and some pictures from the book will hold your interest, dear reader. You can also check out this 2015 interview on book one from the Washington City Paper.

JR: It’s funny that the second book in the Colonial Comics series is actually thicker than the first one. They changed the paper stock, and the second actually has more pages. The covers are supposed to be continuous. [The first book] has the Massachusetts coastline, the Mayflower coming in, a bunch of Pilgrims parked on the shore, and one Native American overlooking it. The second continues with the same shoreline, but now built up to Boston and more ominously, with the British fleet coming in. When we do a mid-Atlantic version, the drawing is going to continue South (i.e. lower in the cover).

MR: Are there any more books in the New England series?

JR: No more. We’re going to cut it off at the Revolution, partly because a lot of people know about the American Revolution. They learned about it in school.

MR: There’s always more, smaller stories…

JR: Absolutely. There’s plenty we could do, but as far as Colonial Comics, the idea was always to go up to the Revolution. Otherwise, it would be Revolutionary Comics. We wanted to focus on the origins of the country.

MR: Are you planning on working your way to the South now?

JR: The third book is supposed to be mid-Atlantic history. We don’t have any plans to start it immediately. With the first book, we put it out there and started working on the second book. We got feedback on the first that we incorporated into the second, but we want get new feedback before we start thinking about the third book. I wouldn’t expect us to start working on a third book for six months or so.

MR: Fulcrum is enthusiastic about the line?

JR: Yes, although the first book didn’t sell quite as well as either of us wanted it to. When we go to a new printing of the book, we’ll make some changes. The second book is strong and addressed feedback we got from the first book, and should take off quicker. The first one sold fine; it just didn’t sell fantastically.
  
MR: I think part of the problem with the first book to a certain degree might be the amount of religion that’s a part of the early American colonies – it’s hard to get away from, it’s hard to understand, and it’s far removed from our culture.

JR: Yes, that led to a structural problem with the stories themselves, because from 1620-1750, people know the landing at Plymouth and the witch trials, and when we try to fill in the spaces, a lot of it is based on religion and is dark stuff, like wiping out populations. And for a lot of it, we have to use primary sources because it’s not covered in a book that we can turn to. Because of that we ended up getting a lot of text-heavy stories that was aimed at an adult audience, but marketed to middle-graders and young adults. With the new book, I was much better at keeping people doing things that feel  like comics with actual actions and not just captions everywhere. I think we took a lot of issues with the first book to heart and came up with something much more fantastic.

MR: Did you use mostly the same contributors?

JR: No. There are some repeats. I have my people that I love working with. John Bell and David Lewis are back as assistant editors. They both also wrote a story. There’s a lot of our DC-area folks – Jason Axtell colored a story in the first book, but he illustrated a story this time. Matt Dembicki’s back. Scott White did the cover again, and this time he also did a comic story. Chris Piers, even though he’s out in Seattle now. [Being interviewed in a bar, Jason overlooked Arsia Rozegar, Mal Jones, Matt Rawson, Rafer Roberts, and Carla Speed McNeil who also contributed]. I always use Charles Fetherolf, Josh O’Neill and James Comey. I loved working with E.J. Barnes and Sara Winifred Searle  in the first volume so I invited them back. Jason Hanley has always been my letterer but for the most part I brought a lot of new people on board.

MR: How do you find people?

JR: We had a general call for submissions that several people responded to, including some great finds. That’s probably where Jackie Roche came from and she is phenomenal. She does these fantastic watercolors. Just like with the first book, I wanted to focus on under-represented narratives, unknown stories, things like that, but I still wanted to touch on some of the big stories that we know.



 I wanted to include the Boston Tea Party in some way, and Jackie came to me with a pitch about actually tracing the tea trade – starting in China, following it through India, and then into Massachusetts and tracing the tea as it went into the harbor.

A lot of the stories are ones I just found. Ashley Victoria Robinson wrote “Mercy Otis Warren” about the playwright, and one by nature I guess, because there were no plays in Boston. It was against Puritanical rules to produce plays. Warren wrote revolutionary plays, originally anonymously, but later took credit for them. Ashley wrote me saying she wanted to do a story about nurses in the Revolutionary War, which we weren’t covering, but since Ashley also had some playwriting experience, I suggested Warren. 

Some people I paired with a topic, and some people came in with great things. Kevin Cooney came through the submission process with a story about the Stamp Act obelisk which I think is one of the greatest things I learned. Matt Dembicki illustrated it. When the Stamp Act was repealed, Paul Revere designed this obelisk which was supposed to be a permanent fixture under the Liberty Tree. The problem was that it was made out of oiled paper and wood, and it was lit from the inside with candles and they put fireworks on top of it, so it burned down the first night they celebrated it. Paul Revere’s plates still survive and I actually made an origami version of it for promotion purposes so you could print it out and fold it.

MR: Do you have an editor at Fulcrum?

JR: Yes, Fulcrum assigns me a chain of editors. Rebecca McEwen edits for content and what’s allowed and what’s not in these books. It’s not just sex and violence but language. There are two stories where I had to put a disclaimer noting that “negro” and “mulatto” were common terms. We had to cut out “damns.” There was a little pushback at times from the artists, but we managed to sustain most of it. The copy editor was Alison Auch and she was great to work with. She was very responsive and helped put the book together. She worked really hard in the last month, because I was late in delivering everything. But I do all the design work including the cover and literally deliver them an entire book, so they could just publish it as-is, but they don’t. They fine-tooth-comb it, and have third party people read it, and put a lot of effort into it.

MR: A few years ago, you did an Amazon-only Kindle children’s book and you’re about to launch a Kickstarter campaign for that?

JR: “The Little Particle that Could” is a story about particle physics and general relativity for kids. The original version followed a graviton who was perfectly happy just spinning and pulling things down to earth until a photon catches her eye and she decides to chase it, off the Earth and into a black hole. We wanted to do a print edition that was a bit more special so now we have a new colorist, and Jason Hanley is re-lettering it. We’re hoping to do a hardcover with nice glossy stock, and then stretch goal to a board book because I love them. We just need to raise $5000, and then $10,000 for the board book. I think it’s achievable.

Sunday, September 08, 2013

Cartoonists and others at Baltimore Comic Con.

The Con is the busiest and biggest that I've ever seen and continues through today. Labels to come later, but the name of the person is in the file name.

Dave McDonald
Frank Cammuso (who will be at SPX with Jay Lynch)Joe Carabeo and Carolyn BelefskiSteve ConleyDave Roman C DowdBarbara DaleTR Logan aka The Laughing RedheadJoe Sutliff
Kevin KAL KallaugherCarla Speed McNeilJK Snyder III and his Shadow coverRoger Langridge doing a Popeye sketchChris SchweitzerKen BaldDon RosaKevin KAL KallaugherJoshua Luna

Thursday, March 10, 2011

PR: Carla Speed McNeil's Finder: See where it all began...


Lose yourself in a world beyond your wildest dreams…

Since 1996, Finder has set the bar for science--fiction storytelling, with a lush, intricate world and compelling characters. Now, Dark Horse is proud to present the first four story arcs of Carla Speed McNeil's groundbreaking series in a single, affordably priced volume!

Follow enigmatic hero Jaeger through a "glorious, catholic pileup of high-tech SF, fannish fantasy, and street-level culture clash" (Village Voice), and discover the lush world and compelling characters that have carved Finder a permanent place in the pantheon of independent comics.

* This first of two Finder Library volumes collects the multiple Eisner Award--nominated story arcs Sin Eater, King of Cats, and fan--favorite Talisman.

* Introduction by Douglas Wolk (Reading Comics).

* For more information about Finder characters, storylines, and more, check out www.FinderComics.com

* Make sure to visit Carla Speed McNeil's blog www.lightspeedpress.com

Creators

Creators: Carla Speed McNeil
Publication Date: March 23, 2011
Format: B&W, 616 pages, TPB, 6" x 9"
Price: $24.99
Age range: 16
ISBN-10: 1-59582-652-1
ISBN-13: 978-1-59582-652-7






Wednesday, March 02, 2011

PR: Fábio Moon delivers ultra-rare variant cover for Dark Horse Presents #2!

As we continue to note, Carla Speed McNeil's strip Finder is appearing in Dark Horse Presents, which is being published with variant covers. Ultra-rare ones.

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Buy Dark Horse Presents #1 for Finder, but you've got a choice of 3 covers.


DC's Carla Speed McNeil is in the comic, but if you buy Dark Horse Presents #1 for Finder, you've got a choice of 3 covers.

From the Dark Horse blog: http://www.darkhorse.com/Blog/273/paul-pope-covers-dark-horse-presents-1-special-ult

Paul Pope covers Dark Horse Presents #1 with special ultra-rare variant cover!

As excitement about the relaunch of the legendary anthology comic Dark Horse Presents builds, Dark Horse president and publisher Mike Richardson—who's also personally editing DHP's anticipated return—is adding another thrilling creator to the premiere issue's roster. In addition to the main cover by Paul Chadwick and Frank Miller's variant cover, an ultra-rare variant by Paul Pope (cover artist for The Escapists, the original and historic run of Dark Horse Presents, Marvel's Strange Tales, DC's Wednesday Comics) will also adorn Dark Horse Presents #1.

Retailers who buy twenty copies of DHP #1 featuring the Chadwick cover, the Miller cover, or a combination of both will receive a copy of DHP #1 featuring the ultra-rare variant cover (available only while supplies last), signed by one of the book's iconic creators. For each additional twenty copies ordered, another ultra-rare variant edition will be received, and each will feature a new signature.

Fans and comic collectors, ask your local retailer about how to get a copy of this exclusive variant-cover issue!

The thrilling lead-in to DHP's relaunch continues today on the Dark Horse blog, when we'll reveal the two covers to issue #2. Be there!

Friday, February 11, 2011

PR: Explore the world of Carla Speed McNeil's Finder at FinderComics.com!

Carla's title is moving into Dark Horse Presents this month.
 
Explore the world of Carla Speed McNeil's Finder at FinderComics.com!

------------------------------

Lose yourself in a world beyond your wildest dreams…

Since 1996, Finder has set the bar for science–fiction storytelling, with a lush, intricate world and compelling characters. Now, Dark Horse is proud to present the first three story arcs of Carla Speed McNeil's groundbreaking series in a single, affordably priced volume!

The following summaries are organized by story arc. "Sin-Eater," "King of the Cats," and "Talisman" are collected in Finder Library Volume 1.

For the ongoing story of Jaeger & co., check out the original graphic novel Finder: Voice and other upcoming volumes from Dark Horse Books.


 

Monday, January 24, 2011

Long 2003 Carla Speed McNeil interview posted

Carla Speed McNeil
Jenni Scott
FA the Comic Zine January 2011
http://comiczine-fa.com/interviews/carla-speed-mcneil/

Ok, this one's 5 years old and just dragged out, but it's really long, but with God as my witness, I'll get Carla on the phone soon for a City Paper interview!

Hat-tip to Tom Spurgeon's Comic Reporter for catching this.

Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Monday, September 28, 2009

More SPX photos

This set's new additions has local DC cartoonists and my friends for the most part. Many of the shots are by my daughter, and these are from Day 2- Sunday, 9/27/09.

100_8157
Chris Schweizer. I love his Crogan's Revenge pirate story.

100_8158 Scott Rosenberg
Crack ex-DC journalist Scott Rosenberg.

100_8154 Steve Conley
Steve Conley. Steve was selling original strips from Socks and Barney for an insanely low price so I bought 2. (that's one of Rob Ullman's girls behind him)

100_8155 Rob Ullman
Rob Ullman, the sadly-missed Washington City Paper's Savage Love columnist.

100_8153 Carla Speed McNeil
Carla Speed McNeil of Finder

100_8152 Andy Runton
Andy Runton of Owly. Box Brown in the background. Pic by Claire.

100_8150 Jennifer Hachigian
Jennifer Hachigian who does Lore. Pic by Claire.

100_8149 Jim Ottaviani
Jim Ottaviani of GT Labs. Pic by Claire.

100_8143 Doug Bratton and John Kovaleski
Doug "Pop Culture Shock Therapy" Bratton and John "Bo-nanas" Kovaleski. I wasn't familiar with Bratton's work but bought a complete set. I think I've got a full set of John's except for minis.

100_8145 John Kovaleski
John Kovaleski

100_8146 Raina Telgemeier
Raina Telgemeier. Pic by Claire.

100_8160 Ed Piskor
Ed Piskor. Pic by Claire.