Showing posts with label Artomatic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Artomatic. Show all posts

Friday, April 21, 2017

Kathleen Brenowitz - An Artomatic update interview

 by Mike Rhode


A few years back we interviewed Kathleen Brenowitz about her cartooning. She's currently exhibiting her work at Artomatic, and we checked back in with her.

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How did you decide to exhibit at Artomatic?

Oddly enough, through LARPing! (Live Action Role Playing). Wyrd Armories (https://wyrdarmouries.com) - the duo who make up the rest of the room I'm displaying in - are friends of mine I met while LARPing with my significant other. When talking shop, Cynthia mentioned Artomatic, and that we all should try to get a room together - and once I'd seen some pictures of previous shows, I was hooked!

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As a sequential artist, how did you decide what to include in the show?

While I'm most known for my comics, I'm also known for my prints - most of them being of characters or worlds I plan to develop as part of my stories. Also I'd been working on stand-alone pieces for a pal's choose your own adventure - the finished "From Out of a Dream" and the current "Back Alive or Maybe Dead".  So all the pieces may have been more illustrative than my usual, there is a theme and a story up on the Artomatic wall.

Has exhibiting at an art show been different than a comic con?

It has been wonderful to get out from behind the table, hands down. At the last meet the artist night, it was a delight to wander from small group to small group, answer questions, and generally move around. Cons have you standing in one place for hours, and it's hard to not get ansty. I also felt like less of a carnival barker - I waved to some people who passed by the room, but I never felt the need to shout to slow down a hurried seeker. At a con, you end up with people walking past a row of  booths simply because it's more of a market - and you're not the booth they're trying to find; as a seller, you need to catch attention, usually with a loud greeting. I may have nearly lost my voice at the artist night, but it was from chatting, not hailing.

The crowd is also a little different - most of my experience of larger cons has been one of younger crowds and a great deal of shopping. Artomatic has the shopping element (in fact, my pieces are available for sale!) but with the motion of going in and out of each little room, there's a urge to linger that comes from passing a threshold. The Artomatic crowd is also very diverse in terms of ages - teenagers stopped by due to the free admission and curiosity, young couples on date nights, middle-aged artists who wanted to see what new stuff had been made, older folks who had great commentary on ink lines. In depends on the con, but I'm used to seeing fewer families and the age range as tilting towards younger - it was nice to have it flip for a change!

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Has it been successful for you in reaching an audience?

Well, half of the art scene in DC knows my day job (art store minion) now, and I ran out of business cards. Time will tell if this brings in more sales/views/general eyeballs-on-my-work overall, but it's been a nice stretch of my boundaries. I'd love to do more long-term shows like this!

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Friday, April 14, 2017

Paula Bannerman: An Artomatic Interview

20170331_203542by Mike Rhode

Paula Bannerman doesn't consider herself a cartoonist, but her display at Artomatic revolves around a cartoon character: "Hello Kitty Gone Wrong is a series of iPad drawings that puts Hello Kitty in Action, Suspense, and mostly Horror situations." She's kindly answered our usual questions anyway.

What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

I'm unsure how to answer this question because I never thought of myself as a comic artist. I like to use bold colors. Everything depends on what I'm using to create.

How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination? 

It's drawn on my iPad. I usually draw while riding on the Metro, especially the red line. I get some much done during Safe Tracking.

When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

Late 70's, Washington, DC

Why are you in Washington now? What neighborhood or area do you live in?

The Washington, DC-area has always been my home. I do love traveling to other places, but I always love coming back to home, even with the changes.

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What is your training and/or education in art?

I have been doing art since I was five years old. I managed to stay in art classes from elementary school to high school. Right now, when I go to the Portrait Gallery’s Open Studio, they have each week a different lesson which is great.

Who are your influences?

My family, my friends, Andy Warhol, Yayoi Kusama, and my art teachers: Roland Colmus, Annette Cross, and Jill Galloway.

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

I wouldn't make any changes over because I am here right now for a reason.

What work are you best-known for?

I think I'm more known for usually drawing on my iPad while riding the Metro (trains and buses); outside of that, I think I am known for one of my first iPad drawings, "In Her Eyes," where you see a red decorated face with a yellow eye. And recently, I think my Hello Kitty's Gone Wrong series is becoming popular because I started receiving Hello Kitty toys, stickers and other merchandise from friends.
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What work are you most proud of?

I'm proud of finishing a piece than just one work.

What would you like to do or work on in the future?

Ever since I started getting involved in the STEM/STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) movement, I would like to work on having large scale pieces with more of a strong emphasis on technology. Then with the pieces, I would love to inspire others to create something amazing as well.

What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

I go to the Portrait Gallery, spend time at my friend’s store in Union Station, travel somewhere, listen to music like the Cirque du Soleil soundtracks or just start doodling.

What do you think will be the future of your field?

In the past three years of drawing on the iPad, I went from just doing small sketches that I thought wouldn't go far, to now creating work wondering what other possibilities can I do with it, then going to conventions and showing others to create more. I feel that within drawing and creating there will always be a need to promote the importance of art, and with that, I see my field as always growing, even with opposition. Art is everywhere and is a powerful force that can't be stopped.

What local cons do you attend? The Small Press Expo, Awesome Con, Intervention, or others? Any comments about attending them?

So far I have done Awesomecon (taking a break this year), Tee con, T-mode, CreatorCon, Makers Day Nova, National Makers Faire, and Girl Scout Makers Day.

My comment about them is regardless of if you are a vendor or visiting, it's always good to have a comfortable pair of shoes and snacks. As well as map out the bathrooms and the cheap restaurants inside and outside of the convention.

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What's your favorite thing about DC?

My favorite thing about DC is the fact there are so many opportunities out there to be able to do whatever they dream of doing for little or to no money. For example, I wanted to learn the coding language, Python. So I went to Hear Me Code, and I was able to get three free Python lessons. Don't get me started on the DC library and their amazing resources!

Least favorite?

Parking

What monument or museum do you like to take visitors to?

The Portrait Gallery because they have the free open studio on Fridays and they have art challenges in the Luce Center on Tuesdays. Also on the weekends, they have free coffee in the Luce Center.

How about a favorite local restaurant?

Pho 88.

Do you have a website or blog?

www.dcartist.com

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Nishith "Nish" Pandya - An Artomatic Interview

by Mike Rhode


Nishith "Nish" Pandya's illustration style, as on display at Artomatic, is somewhat cartoony, but his use of the web-handle "cartoonish" led us to decide to reach out to him. (all images from his websites, as my photos from Artomatic did not come out well).

What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

Lately, my drawing style has been combining my characters and my love for nature and hiking.

How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

I mainly work in pencil, charcoal, or pen-n-ink. I think these mediums tend to enhance the mood I try to create in the drawings.


When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

I was born in 1970 in Baroda, India.


Why are you in Washington now? What neighborhood or area do you live in?

I moved up to DC for a software job and I have been living in Capitol Hill.

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

Aside from watching cartoons on tv...none.


Who are your influences?

I think Bugs Bunny did this to me! I would religiously watch Loony Toons on Saturday mornings.

But somewhat-recent animation programs that I love include Invader Zim and Ed, Edd, and Eddy.

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

My day job is software and sometimes I wish I had focused more on my art.

What work are you best-known for?

Lately, I think I am known for my nature-inspired drawings.

What work are you most proud of?

I have few personal favorites. One of them is on display at Artomatic. It's an illustration of a girl reading a book by a tree.

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What would you like to do or work on in the future?

I am currently learning oil painting. I have tons of sketches that I would like paint...and finally work with color.

In addition, I keep saying I would like to write and illustrate a children's book.

What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

I get drawing blocks and many times I'll go on nature walks to get ideas and inspiration.


What local cons do you attend? The Small Press Expo, Awesome Con, Intervention, or others? Any comments about attending them?

I have not attended any cons. I think I need to attend some!

What's your favorite thing about DC?

I think DC is a great walkable city and I definitely do a lot of walking.






What monument or museum do you like to take visitors to? 

Neither a monument nor a museum, but I like to take visitors to Great Falls if they have never seen it before.

Which side?

I like both sides.

I prefer the hiking on the MD side for myself.

But if my parents come visit me, I ll take them to the VA side since its easier for them to walk around.


Least favorite?

Easy answer...the summers. it gets too hot here.

How about a favorite local restaurant?

It's a chain but I like Matchbox.

Do you have a website or blog?

I am on Instagram. My username is cartoonish2.

I also have a few drawings on www.coroflot.com/cartoonish

Monday, April 10, 2017

Rockeats Alcoreza - An Artomatic Interview

20170331_210813by Mike Rhode

Rockeats Alcoreza's exhibit at Artomatic is heavily-influenced by graffiti and popular culture, especially animation. We reached out to him to ask our usual questions, some of which are less relevant to a painter than a cartoonist.

What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

I do a mixture of urban street art and realism.

How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

Acrylic paint, sometimes oil.

When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

I'm from DC.

Why are you in Washington now?  What neighborhood or area do you live in? 

I live in Arlington, VA's Green Valley.

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

No training or education, but I feel if I take classes my talent will develop greatly.

Who are your influences?

Hip hop, anime, people

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

I would've took art more serious back in middle school. I had a conflict with my art teacher at the time. I didn't continue with art. I completely dropped it. I recently picked it up again.  I know for a fact if I continued doing since middle school to high school, my art would be amazing beyond amazing because I would've learned so many techniques and been guided to produce better art.

What work are you best-known for?

My backgrounds (the patterns you see in majority of my art is called THE 88's).

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What work are you most proud of?

Nothing really I feel like I could do a lot better when I look back at my work.

What would you like to do or work on in the future? 

Make comic strips, funny crude humor or create a book for kids. That would be the dream.

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What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

I hate when that happens; listening to music sometimes helps.

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What local cons do you attend? The Small Press Expo, Awesome Con, Intervention, or others? Any comments about attending them?

Awesome con, but I would like to attend more. I'm not that informed about when these events happen.

What's your favorite thing about DC?

Our go-go music. Our sense of style, the way we talk, and also the fact we are at the nation's capitol.

Least favorite?

Traffic

What monument or museum do you like to take visitors to?

Corinto gallery

How about a favorite local restaurant?

El Pollo Rico -  it's in Arlington - it's crack.

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Do you have a website or blog?

Websites would be https://www.facebook.com/24mobrockeats
https://www.instagram.com/24mobrockeats/
Later I will create my own website.

Friday, April 07, 2017

Ralph Baden - An Artomatic Interview

by Mike Rhode

Ralph Baden's work at Artomatic was quite a surprise as it's often NSFW, or families. The centerpiece of his exhibit is a large painting of a man with an erect penis and a caption that wouldn't make it through many Internet filters. We reached out to him to ask our usual questions, some of which are less relevant to a painter than a cartoonist, and he gamely answered them.

What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

Large scale political satire and comical oil paintings.


How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

Oil painting on canvas.

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When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

1960's Maryland.


What neighborhood or area do you live in?

Baltimore.

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

The Corcoran School of Art


Who are your influences?

I'm doing pretty original stuff. Nobody takes oil painting and makes the most vulgar painting -- except maybe the old Dutch masters -- paintings where people got drunk in the streets -- they were funny.

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

To do it over I'd have to have a career- but I would have gone twice as loud, twice as big and twice as early.


What work are you best-known for?

Nobody knows of me -- I'm amazed you contacted me.


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What work are you most proud of?

 In 2016, being expelled from 2 un-juried shows with 2 completely different bodies of work -- also not being allowed to sell at a farmers market under the freeway by the prison in Baltimore because my work wasn't family friendly... and also not being accepted into The Bromo Seltzer building because my work was considered"too unique".


What would you like to do or work on in the future?

Bigger larger scales. I would like to have a room full of people laughing at my work at The Met or The MOMA


What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

Stare at a light bulb.


What do you think will be the future of your field?

Trash can, dumpster, landfill.

What monument or museum do like to take visitors to?

The Phillips -- I love to go sit in the Mark Rothko meditation room and wonder why.

How about a favorite local restaurant?

Mangialardo's

Do you have a website or blog?

www.ralphbaden.com

Mitchell MacNaughton - An Artomatic Interview (updated)

by Mike Rhode

Mitchell MacNaughton's caricatures and cartoons recall the 1960s as well as today's issues. He's sharing a room at Artomatic in Crystal City and agreed to answer our usual questions.

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What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

Many people would label my work as political cartooning, although that’s not quite how I would describe it. Sure, for many pieces I use ink and my subject is political, but I think that there in a certain refinement that would put it closer to the art side rather than the cartooning side.

How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

If I’m solely creating a black and white piece, my tools include micron pens, black India ink, and either charcoal or a black colored pencil. If I’m creating a piece in color, it could range from gouache to watercolor with certain elements re-colored digitally.

When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

I was born in 1989 on farmlands in Western New York, where I would live for 17 years until I left for Pittsburgh.

Why do you draw and comment on characters and events from the 1960s?

I find mid-century America fascinating because the dynamic of the country completely shifted in a handful of years. President Kennedy came to office on a wave of optimism as the U.S. came to terms with it’s post-war life, then his death is the first in a dark period that saw other assassinations along with riots and strife, and the decade comes to a close with the start of one of our lowest points of the modern century - The Vietnam War. It’s span of years that starts out on a high and bottoms out in a low, and for some reason that intrigues me.

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Why are you in Washington now?  What neighborhood or area do you live in?

I had always wanted to live in DC, as it’s a natural fit for somebody with my artistic themes, and after years of plotting a planning I finally got my chance when I was offered a job at a political direct mail agency. While here, I have never lived in any neighborhood outside of Alexandria.

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

While in studying for my degree in graphic design, I knew that my priority was becoming an illustrator. Thankfully for my perseverance, I had many teachers who insisted that I would fail or that the market was too crowded, so while I was in their classes I would look up artists and and search illustration advice websites out of spite. I took what I was learning in my design courses and let that influence certain facets of my drawing that created my current style.

Who are your influences?

Currently I am obsessed with Kukryniksy - a group of 3 artists who created work out in Russia during World War 2. In fact, I would say that the whole era of political art during World War 2 had a great effect on me. Artists used their astounding talent at a time when the world was witnessing pure evil, and the artwork was unyielding.


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If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

I would work up the confidence to promote myself much earlier. I am the only artist in my family, so I was (and to an extent still am) blindly wandering around trying to figure out what to do, and that creates a sense of never being good enough to compete with those who seem to have it figured out.

What work are you best-known for?

To the extent that I am known, it would probably be for my drawing style and political subject matter.

What work are you most proud of?

I am most proud of creating artwork that highlights certain news stories in the world that may not get as much attention, such as the human rights abuses of Bashar al-Assad or civilian casualties of drone strikes. When you are a political artist, it can be very easy to take the easy attack on a subject, suck as making Trump bright orange, and while that can be fun it should not be at the expense of using your skill to touch on other issues.

What would you like to do  or work on in the future?

One project that I have had on my mind is an animated story/documentary about my uncle’s time in Vietnam and his life after being exposed to Agent Orange, but that is a hefty project that requires many steps in the build-up. Another interest I have been wanting to purse is taking classic literature and spoofing/rewriting them to mock out current political climate.

What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

If I’m feeling the rust coming on then I have to get up and step away from my desk, because I know that if I don’t I will just end up on Youtube and destroy my entire night. Usually I can go play video games for an hour or so to refresh myself and get back in a work mode.


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What do you think will be the future of your field? 

That’s so hard to say. The illustration and art field feels like it is and has been going through such a rapid transformation with the shifting a mediums that they depend on, such as print media and the freelancing economy. All I can do is keep making my work and hoping that I can find new ways to keep it from becoming stale.

What local cons do you attend? The Small Press Expo, Intervention, or others? Any comments about attending them?

I have only attended Small Print Expo as a visitor, where I spent most of my time at the Fantagraphics’ tables.
What's your favorite thing about DC?

I absolutely love the amount of food choices. Possibly it’s because I’m originally a small-town rube, but I’ve become so much more adventurous in my eating here simply because the options are all present for you to try.

Least favorite?
Transportation as a whole. The Metro system only functions in various stages of broken, making a two station trip take upwards of 30 minutes. That isn’t to say that driving is any better, because the drivers here are absolutely wild. Trying to get out of D.C. on these roads with it’s drivers is like trying to escape from a Supermax prison. Nearly impossible.

What monument or museum do like to take visitors to?

My favorite without hesitation is the Presidential portrait room at the National Portrait Gallery.

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How about a favorite local restaurant?

Cape Banh Mi in Alexandria. The catfish is one of the best things I have eaten.


Do you have a website or blog?

macnaughtonillos.com for my art and artotunion.com for my blog.

Friday, March 31, 2017

Andrew Williams - An Artomatic Interview

by Mike Rhode

Andrew Williams cartoon-based painting series at Artomatic in Crystal City is the religious-themed The Good News, but he also did a school newspaper comic strip called Mike and Moop. He's agreed to answer our usual questions.

 What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?  

Well I mainly do newspaper style comic strips on paint canvases.

 How do you do it? 

I use a combination of pencil and acrylic paint. I really want to get back into digital artwork, so I just bought an IPad Pro. We'll see how that works out.

When and where were you born? 

I was born on July 16, 1987 in Washington D.C.

Why are you in Washington now? What neighborhood or area do you live in?  

I actually live in Prince Georges County, Maryland now, but most of the time I'm in DC with my artwork, the city brings out my creativity.

 What is your training and/ or education in cartooning? 

Well, I'm a self-taught artist but I have done one year at the Art Institute of Washington for graphic design. As far as cartooning, I read a lot of comics and watch a lot of cartoons.

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Who are your influences?  

Jesus Christ, Aaron McGruder, Hanna-Barbera and Banksy.

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change? 

I would have copyrighted all of my images and stayed motivated fresh out of high school.

What work are you best-known for? 

I have to say Mike and Moop, only because I've been working on it for over 11 years. Mike and Moop originally appeared in Prince George's County Community College newspaper The Owl. However the Good News seems to be taking the spotlight nowadays.

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What work are you most proud of?  

The Good News, because I really feel like the series is bigger than myself.

What would you like to do or work on in the future? 

As of right now I'm working on combining all of my strips into one book. AND Comics will be an anthology of all the comic strips I'm working on which will consist of Mike and Moop, GOODNEWS and Automatic Water pistols.

Does Good News tell a story?

Good News does tell a story. Unlike Mike and Moop and Automatic Water Pistols the story for GOODNEWS is already written (The Bible). So the purpose for the paintings and comic strip is less dialogue and more visual story telling. The maximum amount of text I want in the GOODNEWS is 10 words. The GOODNEWS ties into Mike and Moop and Automatic Waterpistols, because of the way the characters conduct themselves and the end moral of the stories, even though the characters never come out and say "Hey look, I'm a Christian".

What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block? 

I like to watch artist and hip-hop documentaries. I feel like whenever I'm in a rut or have writers block, its best to look at other established artist for motivation. Exit through the Looking Glass has been on replay ever since I've started doing art shows again.

What do you think will be the future of your field? 

Everything seems to be going digital now, so old-school inking and pencil cartooning will either be obsolete or seen as retro treasures. As far as storytelling goes, I'm interested to see what future kids will have to talk about.
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What local Cons do you attend? 

This year is the first year I applied to Awesome Con in Washington DC. I do plan on attending a few throughout the year.

What's your favorite thing about DC?

The People, Art and Chicken Wings with Mambo sauce.

Least favorite? 

Violence.

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What monument or museum do you like to take visitors to? 

MLK memorial.

How about your favorite local  restaurant?

Ben's Chili bowl.

Do you have a website or blog?   

Instagram: @fir3inmybones

http://www.rawartists.org/dr3wwilliams

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Gordon Thomas Frank - An Artomatic Interview

by Mike Rhode
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Gordon Thomas Frank's art is influenced by cartoons including DC and Disney. A selection is on display at Artomatic 2017 in Arlington, VA. He's answered our usual questions.


What type of comic work or cartooning do you do? 

My work has been described as digital pop art.

How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

Scanned images manipulated through Photoshop.
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When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

I'm a child of the 70's.

Why are you in Washington now?  What neighborhood or area do you live in?

I grew up on the D.C. border in P.G. County. I've lived in Alexandria since 2001.

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

Self-taught. I never finished school.

Who are your influences?

Tumblr is a great source for inspiration. I have spent hours cataloging old comic book panels for future reference for my artwork.

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What work are you most proud of?

It's hanging in Artomatic right now...it's called 'Once You Go Black' and it depicts Sleeping Beauty holding a dildo. The show hadn't even opened, and it caused a few complaints.  The woman using the wall space next to me to said it was borderline child pornography. (She went ballistic and moved to the 3rd floor after someone else hung a floor-to-ceiling-sized painting with a penis on it). Another artist told me the Sleeping Beauty piece was 'kinda sorta' pornography, but was more upset with it because, 'as a Black woman', she felt it was racist.

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Do you have a website or blog?

I am the creator of the tumblr blog Love Boat Insanity (loveboatinsanity.tumblr.com). It's a collection of Love Boat  celebrities (and even fictional characters) that might've been...such as John Waters, Divine, Pam Grier, Ultraman, Jeffrey Dahmer and Tommy Wiseau, etc.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Eric Gordon, the D.C. Creeper - An Artomatic Interview

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by Mike Rhode

D.C. Creepers's Eric Gordon's work is usually based on live sketching of unaware subjects. He's sharing a room at Artomatic in Crystal City and agreed to answer our usual questions.

What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

My comics are all over the map. I've done giant robots, abstract collage stories, and dogs gambling. Most of my published work has been in DC's own Magic Bullet and I also self-publish a number of mini-comics and zines which sell at local shops and fests.  A few titles: Better Know a Ramen, Thank You For Your Cooperation, Mr. Squibly, Verse Scribble Verse, Vinyl Vagabonds and others.

How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

I do as much of my black and white work by hand as possible. I feel the most control of the medium that way, even the mistakes. I prefer brush and ink, but will use various pens as well. I try not to discriminate that much and work to seize the creativity when it happens.  I'll do some manipulation and color work in Photoshop after as needed.  I've been adding some watercolor to the process lately as well.

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When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

1975.

Why are you in Washington now?  What neighborhood or area do you live in?

Born and raised in Bethesda and have roots in the Silver Spring area which is where I currently roost.  I stay here mostly to be near my folks and because I have a good job in the arts with Art Enables, vocational programming for adults with disabilities who are artists.

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

Background in illustration and further studies in social work and mental health.  I interned at Marvel for a while and have worked in animation, graphic design, and gallery management.  I also credit my comic and cartooning experience to the local comic shop, Big Planet in Bethesda, as well as Atomic in Baltimore. Lots of good influences there.  I also was in a cartooning club at the local JCC for a few years growing up, which was pretty formative.

Who are your influences?

I've always been in deep debt to Bill Sienkiewicz, Stan and Jack, Brian Ralph, Daniel Clowes, Scott McCloud, and Berkeley Breathed.  Many others, but these are the first that come to mind.

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

Wish I could have been at Marvel in the 60s instead of the 90s during the bankruptcy.  Also, would have gladly skipped the dot-com boom and bust.

What work are you best-known for?

20170325_173606Probably Mr. Squibly, a gum drop headed every man type. Made at over a dozen mini comics with him.  Also DC Creepers, which is a long running action sketching project I've been working on.

What work are you most proud of?

Mega Turg, my giant robot comic that was in Magic Bullet #3 and 12. Those comics are ridiculous, challenging, and mega fun (see what I just did there?).

What would you like to do  or work on in the future?

Keep challenging myself to make comics (and art in general) that is honest and full.  There have been a few invites to do comics that just didn't make sense for me and my voice. I'm excited about a four-page project for a Cartoonists Draw Blood compilation that is coming together, and a continuing series of paintings inspired by the local music scene.

What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

Procrastinate? No, that's bad. Usually I call my brother, a close friend in Queens, or talk to my wife.  They always seem to know the answer or give me such a wrong answer that it fires me up. Either way I am very lucky to have them for support.

What do you think will be the future of your field?

Small press publishing/self-publishing. Print is being killed by the internet so it's up to local art scenes, zine fests, comics clubs, art studios, and individuals to make the comics of the future. Online is a part of it, but the power and quality of paper is just impossible to ignore.

What local cons do you attend? The Small Press Expo, Intervention, or others? Any comments about attending them?

DC Zinefest -  one of the best I've ever tabled at - great books and crowd. SPX - been going since it began and tabled for the first time last year. It's crazy, but great. Richmond Zinefest - great people and books.

What's your favorite thing about DC?

The Maryland part... seriously though... it has to be the diversity. The Silver Spring area is insanely diverse culturally. That makes for great art, food, music, and life...  so many great subjects to draw from.

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Least favorite?

Tourists and DC haters.  Don't like it here?  Please leave.

What monument or museum do you like to take visitors to?

National Arboretum, Portrait Gallery, Art Enables galleries, and #1 is Baltimore's American Visionary Art Museum.

How about a favorite local restaurant?

Quarry House.

Do you have a website or blog?

www.dccreepers.blogspot.com

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Artomatic exhibits with cartoon overtones, part 1

Unsurprisingly, Artomatic, the DC area's unjuried and large artshow, attracts people influenced by or practicing cartooning. I stopped by this weekend for a first look. This post covers floors 6, 8 and 9.

Eric "E$" Dolgas' sign says he's the 'pioneer of abstract cartooning.' (He's not - read Andrei Molotiu about that field).

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Emily Villataro had a couple of Batman-derived images. This Joker is definitely based on comic book art.

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DC Conspiracy member Michael Auger paints black light florescent animals.

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Donna Lewis is expanding beyond her "Reply All" comic strip with Bella & Boo Design Studio.

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Sharing a room with Lewis is Dennis Goris, an artist who has done some cartoony work around the theme "She Persisted."

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Here's my selfie entitling me to a button though.

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Rambo! does caricature based on movies and television.

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Sina Ouerghi does anime-influenced drawings of women, both her own and DC characters.

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Annie Lunsford is an illustrator, but I think her work has a cartoony feel.

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Comic book influences are obvious in this work by David Barr.

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Brand Dave's Prints on Wood are gag cartoons at heart.

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Clay Harris has a graphic novel for sale, and pages from it on display.

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Mitchell MacNaughton's caricatures and political cartoons recall the 1970s as well as today.

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D.C. Creepers's Eric Gordon will be featured in an interview later this week. His work is usually based on live sketching of unaware subjects.

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Andrew Williams painting series is the religious themed The Goodnews, but he also did a school newspaper comic strip called Mike and Moop. We'll have an interview with him later in the week.

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Gordon Thomas Frank's art is influenced by cartoons including DC and Disney, but has satirical and scatalogical overtones. We'll have an interview him this week.

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In the same room as Frank is Ralph Baden who is NSFW. His website notes, "I paint humorous, vulgar oil paintings, that some might find in bad taste. The reason why I paint - I want my jokes and opinions to last as long as Rembrandt or Van Gogh."

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All my Artomatic photos are here, with more images from each of the artists.