Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Robin Ha podcast

25: Having the courage to try something new, with comic book artist Robin Ha.
Julia Carpenter:
https://soundcloud.com/theladycast/25-having-the-courage-to-try-something-new-with-comic-book-artist-robin-ha

"I only wish that I gave myself a chance to actually do what I wanted to do even sooner."

I spoke this week with comic book artist Robin Ha, whose new book, Cook Korean!: A Comic Book with Recipes, came out early last month. Robin is a Korean immigrant who is formally trained in illustration, but who has continually pushed herself to #dothething throughout her life -- from moving to the U.S. and learning English, to learning to cook, to writing a whole damn book. Robin and I talk about the limitations we often put on ourselves when it comes to creative work, how cooking is similar to painting, and how most Asian mother-daughter relationships are very, very similar.
***
Follow Robin on Twitter: twitter.com/RobinHaART
Robin's blog: banchancomic.tumblr.com/
Get Robin's book: amzn.to/2c73Iq4
***
Julia Carpenter: twitter.com/juliaccarpenter
Subscribe to A Woman to Know: tinyletter.com/awomantoknow
***
Follow The Ladycast online: 
twitter.com/theladycasttinyletter.com/theladycast
theladycast.com/


'Cook Korean' Shares Traditional Food in a New Way

'Cook Korean' Shares Traditional Food in a New Way
Angie Goff
NBC4 Washington (August 30 2016)
http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Korean-Cooking-Guest_Washington-DC-391758141.html

In "Cook Korean," author Robin Ha shares pieces of her life's story
and easy ways to make traditional Korean food. Ha stopped by News4
Midday to share more about the comic book style cook book.

PR: SPX Special Guests Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell, Co-Creators of the March Trilogy


For Immediate Release

Contact: Warren Bernard
  
Email: warren@spxpo.com
 
Small Press Expo Announces Special Guests Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell for SPX 2016
 
Bethesda, Maryland; September 1, 2016
Media Release – Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell collaborated with Civil Rights legend Congressman John Lewis on one of the most powerful graphic novel series in the history of the medium. The award winning March series documents Congress Lewis' experiences in the early Civil Rights movement, culminating with the March on Selma in 1965.
       The final book in the series, March: Book 3, was released this past June to numerous accolades from across the literary and political spectrum. In July, March: Book 2 won the 2016 Eisner Award for Best Reality-Based Work, and in August, the March trilogy was in the top three spots on the New York Times Graphic Novel Bestseller List.
 
Special guests Andrew and Nate will be at the Top Shelf table signing copies of their collaboration, as well as being on a panel discussion about the series as part of SPX 2016 slate of programming.  They are in addition to previously announced special guests Daniel Clowes, Lisa Hanawalt, Jeffrey Brown, Trina Robbins, Charles Burns, Jaime & Gilbert Hernandez, Sarah Glidden Carol Tyler, Jim Woodring, Drew Friedman, Sophie Goldstein, Ed Piskor, and a rare festival appearance by Joe Sacco.
 
International special guests for SPX 2016 are Tom Gauld, Roger Langridge, Aimée de Jongh, Pascal Girard, Cyril Pedrosa, Steffen Kverneland, Santiago García, Ana Galvañ, David Rubín, Javier Olivares and José Domingo.
 
Andrew Aydin serves as Digital Director & Policy Advisor to Congressman John Lewis in Washington, D.C., with whom he co-wrote the March series. While studying at Georgetown University in Washington, Andrew wrote his master's thesis on the history and impact of Martin Luther King & The Montgomery Story. As March has grown into a bona fide phenomenon, Andrew continues to publish and lecture about the history of comics in the civil rights movement — including giving talks at the headquarters of both Google and Apple.
 
Nate Powell, the artist behind the March series, graduated from the School of Visual Arts in 2000. After a decade of working with adults with developmental disabilities, Nate devoted himself full-time to writing and drawing comics. In addition to the March series, his work includes You Don't Say, Any Empire, Swallow Me Whole, The Silence of Our Friends, and The Year of the Beasts. Nate's work has received copious honors, including the Eisner Award for Best Graphic Novel, a Los Angeles Times Book Prize nomination, and four "Great Graphic Novels for Teens" from the American Library Association
 
SPX 2016 takes place on Saturday and Sunday, September 17-18, and will have over 650 creators, 280 exhibitor tables and 22 programming slots to entertain, enlighten and introduce attendees to the amazing world of independent and small press comics.
 
Small Press Expo (SPX) is the preeminent showcase for the exhibition of independent comics, graphic novels, and alternative political cartoons. SPX is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit that brings together more than 650 artists and publishers to meet their readers, booksellers, and distributors each year. Graphic novels, mini comics, and alternative comics will all be on display and for sale by their authors and illustrators. The expo includes a series of panel discussions and interviews with this year's guests.
 
The Ignatz Award is a festival prize held every year at SPX recognizing outstanding achievement in comics and cartooning, with the winners chosen by attendees at the show.
 
As in previous years, profits from the SPX will go to support the SPX Graphic Novel Gift Program, which funds graphic novel purchases for public and academic libraries, as well as the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF), which protects the First Amendment rights of comic book readers and professionals. For more information on the CBLDF, visit their website at http://www.cbldf.org. For more information on the Small Press Expo, please visit http://www.smallpressexpo.com.
 


Dr. Anita Auerbach's eulogy for Richard Thompson

"ARE YOU READY?" "NOOOO!"
Dr. Anita Auerbach
https://findthequiet.com/2016/08/30/are-you-ready-noooo/

Monday, August 29, 2016

Flugennock's Latest'n'Greatest: "Police vs. Cannabis: an Infographic"

From Mike Flugennock, DC's anarchist cartoonist:

"Police vs. Cannabis: an Infographic"
http://sinkers.org/stage/?p=2038

Ignore the anti-legalization shrieking and propaganda, and consider this little factoid: Police have murdered 765 people in the US this year – so far. Meanwhile, absolutely 0 – count 'em, ZERO – people worldwide have died as a direct result of smoking cannabis through all of recorded history.

That's right, smoking cannabis will not kill you – unless you do it in front of a moving bus. See you in DC on September 24!

14x17 inch medium-res color .jpg image, 885kb


Michael Cavna remembers Richard Thompson

Richard Thompson: The art of being a smart, humane artist in a vitriolic, wired world

Comic Riffs

Comics Riffs on Laika Studio and Kubo

The rise of Travis Knight, the son of Nike's founder who built an animation powerhouse [in print as A Knight is a rising king of animation, August 22, 2016]

By Michael Cavna
Washington Post Comic Riffs August 19 2016
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2016/08/19/the-rise-of-travis-knight-the-son-of-nikes-founder-who-built-an-animation-powerhouse/

Sept 21: Juana Medina at Library of Congress

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 – 12 Noon- 1pm
I JUANA LIVE IN AMERICA: AN IMMIGRANT'S [CREATIVE] JOURNEY

Award-winning illustrator Juana Medina will discuss her work and her artistic journey as a Colombian artist living in the United States. Medina is an illustrator and author for children's books, as well as a teacher at George Washington University.

Cosponsored by the Hispanic Division and the Hispanic Cultural Society of the Library of Congress.


Location: Dining Room A, James Madison Building, 6th floor
Event is free and open to the public.
Contact: cgom@loc.gov

https://www.loc.gov/rr/hispanic/events.html

Sept 26: Kate Beaton at Hooray for Books

 
Monday, September 26thWe are thrilled to announce that author and cartoonist extraordinaire Kate Beaton is coming to Hooray for Books! If you are a fan of webcomics, then you might already love Beaton's Hark! A Vagrant series. If you frequent our Wednesday Story Times, then you definitely know how much we love her first picture book, The Princess and the Pony. Now, come out to Hooray for Books! as Beaton presents her second and newest picture book, King Baby, available on September 13th. Just as hilarious as all of Beaton's work, King Baby is sure to be a story time favorite that will resonate with everyone who has ever been a parent, aunt or uncle, sibling, or even just seen a baby in action. Pre-order your copy at Hooray for Books! by dropping by or calling 703-548-4092 during regular business hours. You must purchase at least one Scholastic title from Hooray for Books! in order to join the signing line.
 6 pm.

FrogLogo
 
1555 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314

Richard Thompson Memorial Celebration photographs

Richard's old friend Bruce Guthrie photographed the service and the 'mingling' before and afterwards. See the pictures at

http://www.bguthriephotos.com/graphlib.nsf/keys/2016_08_27B3_RThompson_Memorial3

http://www.bguthriephotos.com/graphlib.nsf/keys/2016_08_27B1_RThompson_Memorial

Excellent Washington Post story on North Korean cartoonist

Reaching a South Korean audience by finding laughs from North Korea [in print as Artist plays a rough life in North Korea for laughs]

New local comic-con next summer

Kevin Bednarz, owner of the comics shop Comic Logic in Ashburn, Va., has posted a teaser about a new local comics convention aimed for next summer. NOVA-Con is planned for July 2017 at the Ritz Carlton in Tyson's Corner.

Per his Facebook post: "A one of a kind comic/art/pop culture convention. Many more details and announcements to come in the following weeks & months. Stay tuned."

Comic Riffs talks to Trudeau about Trump

Prior to his visit to Politics and Prose bookstore today, Michael Cavna talks to Garry Trudeau of Doonesbury -

'Yuge!'/'Doonesbury' cartoonist Garry Trudeau: 'If Trump wins, I'll miss civilization as we know it.'

Comic Riffs

Friday, August 26, 2016

Gail Rubin remembers Richard Thompson

Cartoonist Richard Thompson Made Us Laugh

A Good Goodbye blog August 26th, 2016
http://agoodgoodbye.com/notable-obituaries/cartoonist-richard-thompson-made-us-laugh/

Before you read that -

The service for Richard Thompson will be held at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, this Saturday, August 27th at 1pm.

IT WILL BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC from 1pm until 2:30 pm, after which there will be a private reception for friends and family.

Sept 2-4: Baltimore Comic Con programming

Baltimore Comic-Con 2016 Announces Panel Programming

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND - August 22, 2016 - The 17th annual Baltimore Comic-Con returns to the Baltimore Convention Center the weekend of September 2-4, 2016. Tickets are available now for General Admission, VIP, and Harvey Awards! As is the case every year, we have received a steady stream of requests for our Panel schedule -- details are now ready for release, and we're really excited to share them with you!

Friday will feature a panel on our 2016 Baltimore Comic-Con Yearbook featuring the cast of Archie Comics, a spotlight on J.M. DeMatteis, and numerous panels featuring some of the industry's largest publishers including DC, IDW, and Valiant Entertainment!

 

Saturday, publisher panels include Marvel, BOOM! Studios, and Archie, spotlight panels on Joe Giella, Al Jaffee, John McCrea, Guest of Honor Kevin Eastman, and media guests Candice Patton, Kristian Nairn, and Sean Astin, and a drawing demonstration from Adam Hughes.

 

Sunday, learn about the connection between music and comics, world building, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, and attend spotlights on Steve Englehart, Howard Chaykin, Soman Chainani, and media guest Hayley Atwell!

 

We also continue our series of cosplay-oriented panels throughout the weekend, featuring topics of interest to both participants and spectators alike.

 

And, of course, don't let your children miss the excitement scheduled for the Kids Love Comics Pavilion!


Continue reading here.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Flugennock's Latest'n'Greatest: "Return Of The Choom"

From DC's anarchist cartoonist Mike Flugennock:

"Return Of The Choom"
http://sinkers.org/stage/?p=2034

Inspired by a scene from Return Of The Jedi in which Han Solo is frozen in carbonite in Jabba's lair, this poster announces a new round of cannabis legalization protest in Washington, DC and the White House on September 24, and calls on the DEA to "release the #Choom" -- to deschedule cannabis and free all prisoners being held for marijuana "crimes".

Needless to say, there's a lot of discontent boiling in the cannabis activist community about the DEA dragging its feet and stringing everybody along for months before finally blowing us off and refusing to remove cannabis from its "Schedule 1" list, alongside heroin. Much of the criticism is also directed at President Sparkle Pony, who claimed he would let science dictate policy and not politics, but has consistently chosen to support the failed Drug War policies which have their roots in the Nixon Administration. (The joke going around the DCMJ office is that the DEA has Obama "frozen, like Han Solo"; the term "choom" refers to Obama's weed-smoking posse from school, nicknamed the "Choom Gang".)


Aug 29: Garry Trudeau at Politics and Prose

Garry Trudeau at P&P
Monday, August 29 at 4 PM - 6 PM
Politics & Prose Bookstore
5015 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, District of Columbia 20008

Comic Riffs profiles Roye Okupe and YouNeek Studios

He came to D.C. from Nigeria — and created his own African comic-book universe

Comic Riffs  

The Nerdist likes Tom King's Omega Men, a lot

THE OMEGA MEN Deals in Philosophy the Way Only a Comic Book Can

by on August 23, 2016

http://nerdist.com/the-omega-men-deals-in-philosophy-the-way-only-a-comic-book-can/

Library of Congress on a Charles Dana Gibson' editorial crtoon

World War 1: Bad Romance — Gibson's Chilling Personification of War

by Katherine Blood

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Flugennock's Latest'n'Greatest: "Broken Windows"

From DC's anarchist cartoonist...

"Broken Windows"
http://sinkers.org/stage/?p=2030
posted 08.16.16

A couple of nights ago, yet another black youth was killed by police in America -- this time in Milwaukee, touching off a night of rioting which featured the burning of a gas station and the smashing of windows on businesses and cop cars. And as usual, White America and the mainstream media were getting their panties in a twist more about broken windows than human lives.

For those of you who've been living in caves since the 1990s, "Broken Windows" has been a policing institution gifted to us by the likes of Rudolph Giuliani in New York City. Basically a pretext for the establishment of paramilitary police occupations of the poorest -- and blackest -- areas, it was such a hit that "Broken Windows" opened up franchises in pretty much every city in the US, spreading its brand of harassment, profiling, intimidation and brutality.

After observing this form of right-wing "folk wisdom" in action for over twenty years, I can't help but ask: whose windows are really being broken here?



RICHARD THOMPSON MEMORIAL SERVICE

RICHARD THOMPSON MEMORIAL SERVICE
A service for Richard will be held at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, this Saturday, August 27th at 1pm.

IT WILL BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC from 1pm until 2:30 pm, after which there will be a private reception for friends and family.

Again, the family asks that in lieu of flowers please consider making a donation to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, either directly or through Team Cul De Sac (https://www.michaeljfox.org/get-involved/teamfox.php).

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Interview with Greg Pak (Incredible Hulk, Kingsway West, Eternal Warrior)

by Mike Favila (Guest Writer / ComicsOnline.com Senior Editor)

My neighbor (and Editor-In-Chief) Mike Rhode is taking his daughter off to college for the first time, so I'm taking a second away from my duties at ComicsOnline.com to interview writer Greg Pak for ComicsDC.

If you're not familiar with Greg Pak's work,chances are you probably just haven't been reading the credits that tightly.  I've mostly recently read his stuff for the relaunch of Eternal Warrior through Valiant Comics, but he's the man responsible for the awesomely out there World War Hulk storyline.  I didn't know this until I read his Wiki, but he also created Amadeus Cho.  Not too shabby.

Thanks for taking the time to chat.  Here's a few questions to start with:

What was the genesis for Kingsway West?  Obviously there's been different pieces of fiction relating to the Chinese people in a Western setting, but the fantasy elements are way more pronounced than anything I've read before.  

I first started thinking about about telling a story with a Chinese gunslinger in the Old West over twenty years ago. I grew up in Texas and loved Westerns, and when I learned about the real history of Chinese immigrants in the Old West, I just couldn't stop thinking about it. So this was my dream project when I started film school in the '90s. And after I started writing comics, I worked on different comic book versions of the story, doing a couple of short stories for the OUTLAW TERRITORY anthology with artists Ian Kim and Sean Chen. But I always wanted to do a longer version of the story, and eventually started talking with editor Jim Gibbons at Dark Horse. Jim loved the characters and story I pitched, but asked if there was something more I could bring to the story to push it over the top. And I thought about it for a while, and found myself thinking about fantasy and magic. I'd loved Lord of the Rings and Dungeons and Dragons when I was growing up for some of the same reasons I'd loved Westerns -- that kind of big, epic, outdoor adventure is part of both genres. And the more I worked on it, the more it made sense to merge those genres in a story about a Chinese gunslinger searching for his wife in an Old West overrun with magic.

How did you get together with Mirko Colak?

Mirko and I worked together on Marvel's RED SKULL INCARNATE and Dynamite's TUROK, both books that involved realistic, historically based material. I knew he'd absolutely kill on a Western. He's been tremendous. And I should add that colorist Wil Quintana and letterer Simon Bowland are doing amazing work on the book as well. I'm so lucky and happy!

How did you end up publishing at Dark Horse?

If I'm remembering correctly, I think Mirko had met Jim somehow and made the introduction. As soon as I started talking with Jim, I knew I wanted to do the book there. Jim asked all the right questions to push me to make the book better. Jim since left the company to work for Stela, but Spencer Cushing has taken over as editor and Spencer's been fantastic -- just a tremendous sounding board and advocate and hustler to keep the book on time and make it as good as it can be.



How much of the arc do you have planned out?

I've written all four issues of the miniseries. I've got my fingers mightily crossed -- if the numbers are good enough, we may be able to do a second volume. So if anyone reading is interested, please do ask your local comics shop to order the books for you, or go to KingswayWest.com and pre-order there!

I loved the relaunch of Eternal Warrior, and was impressed with your take on it.  Were you a fan of original Valiant comics?  How did you get involved?

Thanks so much for the kind words! I actually didn't read many of the original Valiant comics -- they came out during a window in time when I wasn't buying a ton of monthlies. But I always loved the concepts. I got pulled on board ETERNAL WARRIOR by editor Warren Simons, with whom I'd done MAGNETO TESTAMENT over at Marvel. I loved working with Warren and was thrilled to have a shot at working with him again. And the Eternal Warrior character was up my alley -- again, as a fan of outdoor adventure and fantasy. I'm particularly proud of the second arc we did on that series, drawn by Robert Gill, in which we jumped a couple of thousand years into the future. Had a huge amount of fun with the worldbuilding there, and I loved the emotional story between Gilad and his granddaughter.

Did you have to coordinate with the other titles launching for Valiant, or did Warren provide a lot of the parameters?

I definitely read the other issues that had referenced Gilad before I started. And Warren definitely kept it on track continuity-wise. He had a great eye on the big picture all the time -- he's just done a tremendous job herding all those books.

As a Filipino, I've always been drawn to the names of the Asian creators (like Whilce Portacio or Frank Cho) that have been on the credits of the comics I read growing up.  It seems like seeing realistic Asian characters portrayed on the page(such as the Amadeus Cho Hulk) is the natural next step.  Do you feel that this is just a reflection of society today, or did that require a concerted effort on the part of comic companies/creators?

I've been writing comics for over twelve years now, and from the beginning, my editors have always supported my working diverse characters into the casts of my books. My very first published comic was the WARLOCK mini in 2004, which starred an Asian American woman named Janie Chin. And artist Takeshi Miyazawa and I created Amadeus Cho eleven years ago, and I was able to write him as a supporting character in the Hulk books and eventually as the co-star of the INCREDIBLE HERCULES series, co-written with Fred Van Lente, for over four years. And over the years I also created S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Jake Oh and used Suzie Endo in the SILVER SURFER book and created a half-Japanese alternative-world Namor in X-TREME X-MEN and used Sharon (played by Grace Park in the television series) as the central character in the second half of my BATTLESTAR GALACTICA series and wrote a bunch of book starring other people of color. So in my experience, working with the awesome editors I've had over the years, the door has always been open -- I just had to walk through it.

But I also think we're living at a time when more and more people are aware that audiences want more diverse casts and more and more creators of different backgrounds are breaking in and blowing up in all kinds of great ways, which is great. Fifteen years ago, when I was speaking at film festivals with my films, I used to say that in fifteen years the changing demographics of the country would make it a no-brainer to make media with diverse casts. We're in the middle of businesses waking up to that right now, and it's very exciting.

Less related, but also curious: How are you involved with Fresh Off The Boat?  I saw something on your Wiki, but I had no clue that you had a hand in the show.

Oh, I love the show, but I'm not at all involved in its creation or production. I was a lucky participant on a panel discussion about it when it premiered. I'm thrilled it's done so well -- it's time, huh?

The Express on Kubo

Dolby Cinema is the way to see 'Kubo and the Two Strings'

By Kristen Page-Kirby

Express August 19 2016

https://www.washingtonpost.com/express/wp/2016/08/19/dolby-cinema-is-the-way-to-see-kubo-and-the-two-strings/

A new ocean video by Jim Toomey

Two Minutes on Oceans with Jim Toomey: Green Fins for a Blue Planet

Published on Aug 14, 2016
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzThAIkmitQ

Dive tourism is increasing at a rate of nearly one million new divers every year. Great news for the dive industry, but what about potential impacts on coral reefs and marine ecosystems? Watch this video to learn how divers and snorkelers can enhance environmental and economic sustainability through the Green Fins certification program.


The "Two Minutes on Oceans with Jim Toomey" video series uses animation and humor to explain complex scientific issues in simple terms to the general public. The series was produced as a partnership between nationally syndicated cartoonist, Jim Toomey, and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Additional videos from the series can be viewed at: www.rona.unep.org/toomey

A Richard Thompson tribute in Betty

Betty by Gary Delainey and Gerry Rasmussen

August 20, 2016
http://www.gocomics.com/betty/2016/08/20

(thanks to Carol Tilley for pointing it out)

Friday, August 19, 2016

Thursday, August 18, 2016

The Post on 'Sausage Party,' Night Thrasher, Geoff Johns and 'Kubo'

The working conditions for some 'Sausage Party' animators were pretty terrible [in print as Strained animators speak out about how 'Sausage got made]

By Stephanie Merry

Washington Post August 18 2016, C1-2

online at https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2016/08/17/for-audiences-sausage-party-was-a-laugh-riot-for-some-animators-it-was-a-nightmare/

 

The one superhero who can fix DC Comics's movies [Geoff Johns].

By David Betancourt

Washington Post Comic Riffs August 17 2016

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2016/08/17/the-one-superhero-who-can-fix-dc-comics-movies/

 

The black superhero that Baltimore needs right now [Night Thrasher].

By David Betancourt

Washington Post Comic Riffs August 16 2016

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2016/08/16/the-black-superhero-that-baltimore-needs-right-now/

 

'Kubo and the Two Strings' weaves a magical tale that feels both ancient and fresh

By Michael O'Sullivan

Washington Post.com August 18 2016: https://www.washingtonpost.com/goingoutguide/movies/kubo-and-the-two-strings-weaves-a-magical-tale-that-feels-both-ancient-and-fresh/2016/08/18/a8f33754-60a3-11e6-9d2f-b1a3564181a1_story.html

Small Press Expo Announces the 2016 Ignatz Award Nominees



2016 Ignatz Award NOminees

For Immediate Release
Contact: Eden Miller
Email: spxignatz@gmail.com

Bethesda, Maryland; August 18, 2016 Media Release ­—

The Small Press Expo (SPX), the preeminent showcase for the exhibition of independent comics, graphic novels and alternative political cartoons, is pleased to announce the 2016 nominees for the annual presentation of the Ignatz Awards, a celebration of outstanding achievement in comics and cartooning.

The Ignatz, named after George Herriman's brick-wielding mouse from his long running comic strip Krazy Kat, recognizes exceptional work that challenges popular notions of what comics can achieve, both as an art form and as a means of personal expression. The Ignatz Awards are a festival prize, the first of such in the United States comic book industry. This year's Ignatz image is by 2015 Promising New Talent winner, Sophia Foster-Dimino.

The nominees for the ballot were determined by a panel of five of the best of today's comic artists, Tony Breed, Summer Pierre, Keiler Roberts, C. Spike Trotman and J.T. Yost., with the votes cast for the awards by the attendees during SPX. The Ignatz Awards will be presented at the gala Ignatz Awards ceremony held on Saturday, September 17, 2016 at 9:30 P.M.

Additional information on the nominees can be found at www.smallpressexpo.com/spx-2016-ignatz-nominees

Once again we want to thank our our friends at comiXology for sponsoring the Ignatz Awards. Information on comiXology and their self-publishing portal Submit can be found at https://submit.comixology.com.

The 2016 Ignatz Award Nominees
 



Outstanding Artist

  • Daniel Clowes for Patience
  • Ryan Heshka for Mean Girls Club
  • Kevin Huizenga for Ganges
  • Noah Van Sciver for Disquiet
  • Tillie Walden for The End of Summer  
Outstanding Anthology or Collection
  • Beverly by Nick Drnaso
  • Beyond: The Queer Sci Fi and Fantasy Anthology edited by Sfé R. Monster and Taneka Stotts
  • The Complete Wimmen's Comix edited by Trina Robbins
  • Killing And Dying by Adrian Tomine
  • Step Aside Pops by Kate Beaton

Outstanding Graphic Novel

  • Hot Dog Taste Test by Lisa Hanawalt
  • Nod Away by Josh Cotter
  • Sick by Gabby Schulz
  • Soldier's Heart by Carol Tyler
  • Trashed by Derf Backderf

Outstanding Story

  • The Hunter by Joe Sparrow
  • Killing and Dying by Adrian Tomine
  • "Megg & Mogg In Amsterdam" from Megg & Mogg in Amsterdam and Other Stories by Simon Hanselmann
  • My Hot Date by Noah Van Sciver
  • "Shrine of the Monkey God" by Kim Deitch from Kramers Ergot 9

Promising New Talent

  • Kevin Budnik for Handbook
  • Maia Kobabe for Tom O'Bedlam
  • Sara Lautman for The Ultimate Laugh, Grape Nuts
  • Carolyn Nowak for Radishes
  • Tillie Walden for I Love This Part

Outstanding Series

  • Cartozia Tales edited by Isaac Cates
  • Demon by Jason Shiga
  • Ganges by Kevin Huizenga
  • Megg & Mogg & Owl by Simon Hanselmann
  • Powdered Milk by Keiler Roberts

Outstanding Comic

  • As the Crow Flies by Melanie Gillman
  • Be Good by John Martz
  • Fantasy Sports No. 1 by Sam Bosma
  • Patience by Daniel Clowes
  • "Shrine of the Monkey God" by Kim Deitch from Kramers Ergot 9

Outstanding Minicomic

  • The Experts by Sophie Franz
  • Laffy Meal by Pranas T. Naujokaitis
  • Maps to the Suns by Sloane Leong
  • Radishes by Carolyn Nowak
  • The Unofficial Cuckoo's Nest by Luke Healy

Outstanding Online Comic



SPX will be held Saturday, September 17 from 11AM to 7PM and Sunday, September 18, noon-6PM at The North Bethesda Marriott Convention Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Admission is $15 for Saturday, $10 for Sunday and $20 for both days.
 
For further information on the Ignatz Awards, the nominees or to request an interview, please contact Ignatz Awards coordinator, Eden Miller, at spxignatz@gmail.com or SPX executive director, Warren Bernard at warren@spxpo.com.  For more information on the Small Press Expo, please visit http://www.spxpo.com.

Once again we want to thank our our friends at comiXology for sponsoring the Ignatz Awards. Information on comiXology and their self-publishing portal Submit can be found at https://submit.comixology.com.




Nell Minow reviews Kubo

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Meet a Local Cartoonist: A Chat with Jasmine Pinales

by Mike Rhode

Jasmine Pinales exhibited at the DC Zinefest and agreed to answer our usual questions afterward. She will be at SPX this fall if you'd like to meet her, and her comics are for sale now on her website. (All images are taken from her website).

What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

I write and draw fiction and autobio comics.


How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

My work is all traditional. I pencil, ink and letter on paper. I've used ink, markers and watercolor for my final pages depending on what best fits a project. I have produced some digital art but it never feels as strong as my traditional art, I don't think it's the best representation of my art. I lay out my comics on computer and do corrections and clean up.

When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

1988.

Why are you in Washington now?  What neighborhood or area do you live in?

I live outside of DC in Fairfax County. We moved here when I was 3 and I've been here most of my life. I went to Norfolk for college then returned.

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

Most of my comics work is self taught. I spent my childhood reading the WashPo comics section, collected Garfield, Calvin & Hobbes and other strips. In late elementary school I got interested in anime and manga and started copying that while still be interested in  American cartoons and the eventual rise of webcomics on the internet. I've never taken a comics class, I've learned by example and reading all of the backmatter in comics about how pages are made. I've got Eisner's books on comics, and McCloud's which gave me more concrete ideas on how to make better comics. I have a BFA in Studio Art where I focused on comics for my Senior Show, so I have art training.

Who are your influences?

Everything. I really got into Will Eisner's work between The Spirit and his more personal projects after he was done with that. Piet Mondrian is one of my favorite painters, I love Dali and Caravaggio. Yuko Ota and Meredith Gran have some of the best comic timing and gorgeously clean art. Takako Shimura has comics fill of emotional characters and art that has a nice weight to it. So many cartoons, I loved The Weekenders and Recess as a kid. I've pulled visual cues I like from Jen Wang, I really like the was she draws eyes. Craig Thompson's work is gorgeous and made me want to try harder with brushes/brush pens. Internet discussions have made me more confident and inspired to try a broader variety in body types and more diversity, even though plenty of my early characters had variety.

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

 All of my past experiences have brought me to where I am now and things would be different if I changed anything. That said, it'd be interesting to see how things could be different if I had gone into college focusing on comics and art and not transferring to comics after a few years in science.

What work are you best-known for?

I don't think I'm known for anything at this moment.

What work are you most proud of?

"How to Make Friends and Captivate People", it's my longest comic to date at 28 pages or so, the printed book has 40 because of an extra story. It was a struggle to produce as I had never tried such a long narrative and I misjudged how long it would take.

What would you like to do  or work on in the future?

 I'd like to continue working on my various stories and characters. I have a female knight and prince story; a group of theater nerd kids; a depressed robot and a myriad of others that I'm sketching out and thinking over slowly. I have a lot of ideas and just need the money and time to focus on them.

What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

I'll step away from a project and create differently. Changing media or tools helps to reinvigorate me to focus on the main projects I'm working toward. This year I got into Hamilton and drew a mess of art, sketches and comics and in the past few weeks I've been listening to the audiobook of Jurassic Park and have had a wealth of ideas for mini comics about the first book that have relatively little to do with the movie. Sometimes indulging and receiving media is necessary to get a new spark, you'll see the right turn of phrase and everything starts turning again and you can keep creating. Another thing I've done, in 2013 after college I stopped drawing just to take a break and I felt awful not drawing anything after a few months so I forced myself to do a little sketch before bed.

 Those sketches turned into a sketchbook I have a shows for sale as I worked through being burnt out and getting back into the groove of production. In 2014 I did a daily sketchbook where I tried different ideas in the small spaces I had. These were for me but sharing them was a great experience too as I became more comfortable with what I could do in the space provided and looked up new topics.

What do you think will be the future of your field? 

More independent creators and creator owned work becoming popular and bigger powerhouses in comics shops. Image does an amazing job putting creators first and Fantom Comics in Dupont Circle works so hard to promote creator own material even as they stock DC and Marvel. They're still big in supporting local DMV creators.

What local cons do you attend? The Small Press Expo, Intervention, or others? Any comments about attending them?

I've attended SPX since 2012 and this is my first year tabling it, I'm excited. It's a lovely show to attend, a large crowd but there's so much positivity and love for comics in everyone attending and tabling it's great. I'll have at least one new book there that weekend that I'm working on. I'm at L7.

BMore Into Comics in Baltimore is a fun little day show. It's tiny -- in a bar -- but as an attendee you would have plenty of time to talk to the local artists who are tabling. An upside to small shows over big shows and some great local creators go there.

The DC Zinefest - I've shown there since 2015, the audience is very enthusiastic. It's great seeing how many female creators there are.

The Richmond Zinefest, I've tabled there two times now, and it's been in different venues both years, but has been going on for a while in its previous venue. The way it was set up in the library felt confusing as a tabler, maybe it was better for someone who knows that library better, but I heard from many people as they stumbled to the room I was in they were surprised there was another room.

Locus Moon in Philly, I showed there in 2015, it was a ton of fun. Great creators and audience. Everyone there was super enthusiastic. I've heard they're focusing more on publishing and I'd like to go to the show again, not sure if it's happening anymore.

Comics Arts Brooklyn - a small show in a church in Brooklyn, NY. Like smaller shows you get a great change to meet and talk to a creator for a while. Attendance has been enthusiastic and it's at a pretty good time of year in November, chilly but not too cold.

What's your favorite thing about DC?

The variety of people and things to do.

Least favorite?

Metro. Also driving around here is a hassle, not always a direct way someplace. I can drive from where I am to Maryland in 30 minutes or to the middle of the city in 45.

What monument or museum do like to take visitors to?

I don't have many visitors, I'd want to show them the [National Gallery of Art's] East and West Galleries though; I'm a big fan of art history.

How about a favorite local restaurant?

Daikaya in Chinatown. Both the upstairs Izakaya and the downstairs ramen bar.

Do you have a website or blog?

jasmine-pinales.com also meisterjdraws.tumblr.com

Meet a Local Cartoonist: A Chat with Michael Brace

by Mike Rhode

Michael Brace is a member of the DC Conspiracy comics co-op.  He was at DC Zinefest this summer, and finally agreed to answer our standard questions. He will be at SPX next month if you'd like to meet him.


What type of comic work or cartooning do you do?

I just finished my second black-and-white comic book its in a realistic style. I also contribute one-page stories to a local newspaper comic Magic Bullet and those tend to be a little more cartoony.

How do you do it? Traditional pen and ink, computer or a combination?

Mostly traditional pen and ink. I used a computer for lettering and occasionally for adding color.

When (within a decade is fine) and where were you born?

1950s

Why are you in Washington now?  What neighborhood or area do you live in?

Long-time Foggy Bottom resident. I came here to pursue an illustration career.

What is your training and/or education in cartooning?

Took a one-year commercial art vocational training class back in 1973.

Who are your influences?

Too many to name. I'm a big fan of turn-of-the-century book illustration (I should say turn-of-last-century book illustration) and woodblock prints.

If you could, what in your career would you do-over or change?

Would have focused more on writing skills.

What work are you best-known for?

Pages in Magic Bullet and artwork for District Comics.

What work are you most proud of?

Managing to finish two comic books.

What would you like to do  or work on in the future?

I would like to expand on my last comic "Never Rescue an Octopus from a Tree".

What do you do when you're in a rut or have writer's block?

I try to have a couple of projects going so I can switch off to keep things fresh.

What do you think will be the future of your field?

I think independent comics will continue to expand on both the web and in print. Flexibility is key.

What local cons do you attend? The Small Press Expo, Intervention, or others? Any comments about attending them?

Zine Fest and Small Press Expo this year. Great to have an alternative to superhero cons.

What's your favorite thing about DC?

Don't need a car to get around.

Least favorite?

The local neighborhoods are being gobbled up.

What monument or museum do like to take visitors to?

Air and Space Museum and National Cathedral.

How about a favorite local restaurant?

No longer around "Dove and Rainbow." Made their pizzas with Greek cheeses, they were great.

Do you have a website or blog?

Not at this time.

Nell Minow interviews Kubo director

Interview: Travis Knight on "Kubo and the Two Strings"

by Nell Minow

August 2016

http://www.beliefnet.com/columnists/moviemom/2016/08/interview-travis-knight-kubo-two-strings.html

Michael Cavna on his scrubbed comic strip Nickipedia

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

PR: SPX 2016 Announces Spanish Fever



Contact: Warren Bernard
Email: warren@spxpo.com
 
SPX 2016 Announces Spanish Fever with Santiago García, Ana Galvañ, David Rubín, Javier Olivares and José Domingo for SPX 2016
 
Bethesda, Maryland; August 16, 2016
Media Release – With funding and assistance from SPAIN arts & culture, Small Press Expo is proud to announce Santiago García, Ana Galvañ, David Rubín, Javier Olivares and José Domingo as special international guests at SPX 2016. These gifted artists are featured in Spanish Fever-Stories By The New Spanish Cartoonists, an anthology of 28 contemporary comics by 30 authors from Spain showcasing the best of the new wave of art comics hailing from a country with one of the strongest cartoon traditions in Europe. Spanish Fever is published by Fantagraphics and will be debuting at SPX 2016.

These creators are in addition to previously announced special guests Daniel Clowes, Lisa Hanawalt, Jeffrey Brown, Trina Robbins, Charles Burns, Jaime & Gilbert Hernandez, Sarah Glidden Carol Tyler, Jim Woodring, Drew Friedman, Sophie Goldstein, Ed Piskor, and a rare festival appearance by Joe Sacco.
 
Other international special guests include Tom Gauld, Roger Langridge,Aimée de Jongh, Pascal Girard, Cyril Pedrosa and Steffen Kverneland.
 
Santiago García has been a comic's creator and essayist for more than twenty years. He was a founding member of U and Volumen, magazines specializing in comic reviews and news, for which he served as editor. He has written about comics for the cultural supplement of ABC and is the author of La novela gráfica (2010), which has been translated into English for the University Press of Mississippi as On the Graphic Novel (2015). In 2011 he received the outreach prize at the Salón del Cómic de Barcelona. In the last few years, he published the graphic novels Beowulf (2013) with David Rubín, Fútbol [Soccer] (2014) with Pablo Ríos, and Las meninas [The Maids of Honor] (2014) with Javier Olivares, The Maids of Honor won the National Prize in 2015 and will be published by Fantagraphics in 2017.
 
Ana Galvañ was born in Murcia, Spain. After her time in the Faculty of Fine Arts in Valencia, she moved to Madrid, where she worked as art director. She eventually left advertising to pursue comics and illustration full time. Her work has appeared in publications such as Mortland, Nobrow, Off Life, Clift, Ferocious Quarterly, Autsaider comics, Skunk Art Mag, and Tik Tok. Galvañ published Trabajo de clase in 2014, Más allá del Arcoiris in 2015 and Luz Verdadera in 2016.
 
David Rubín was born in Orense in 1977. He is a comics and animation illustrator, who codirected the full-length animated film El espíritu del bosque [The Spirit of the Forest] (2008). His many graphic novels include La tetería del oso malayo [The Tea Room of the Sun Bear] (2006) and Cuaderno de tormentas [Notebook of Storms] (2008). His graphic novel El Héroe [The Hero] (2011–2012), retells the myth of Hercules from the perspective of superheroes, which was translated into English in 2015 and published by Dark Horse. He adapted Beowulf with a script by Santiago García, soon to be published in the United States.  His collaborations with American creators, include The Rise of Aurora West with scripts by Paul Pope and J. T. Petty, and The Fiction (2015) written by Curt Pires.
 
Javier Olivares was born in Madrid in 1964. An illustrator and cartoonist, he started the journal Madriz in the '80s, and since then has contributed work to numerous magazines and newspapers, as well as illustrating books  for both children and adults. His most recent graphic novel Las meninas (2014), which was translated into French and won the National Comic Award. The comic Finland, which is included in Spanish Fever - Stories from the New Spanish Cartoonists was adapted from an original story by Argentine author Hernán Casciari.
 
José Domingo was born in Zaragoza in 1982. An illustrator, cartoonist, and animator, Domingo is part of the Polaqia Collective. His first long comic was Cuimhne: El fuego distante [Cuimhne: The Distant Fire] (2008), with a script by Kike Benlloch. With Aventuras de un oficinista japonés [Adventures of a Japanese Businessman] (2011) he won the Salón del Cómic de Barcelona prize and the English edition from Nobrow was nominated for an Eisner Award. His latest works are Conspiraciones (2013), and Pablo and Jane and the Hot Air Contraption (2015).
                                        
SPAIN arts & culture features the most cutting-edge works of international renowned Spanish artists in fields such as design, urban culture, architecture, visual arts, film, performing arts, literature and music. A series of exhibitions, conferences, showcases, and performances take place every year at the most prestigious American cultural institutions bringing a taste of all the creativity, history, and talent of Spanish artists to the American public. This program is organized by the Embassy of Spain's Cultural Office in Washington DC and its network of General Consulates and Cervantes Institutes in the United States together with the Spain-USA Foundation. More info: www.spainculture.us.
 
In the next few weeks, SPX will be announcing the 2016 Ignatz Award nominees, a full slate of programming and additional special guests.
 
SPX 2016 takes place on Saturday and Sunday, September 17-18, and will have over 650 creators, 280 exhibitor tables and 22 programming slots to entertain, enlighten and introduce attendees to the amazing world of independent and small press comics.
 
Small Press Expo (SPX) is the preeminent showcase for the exhibition of independent comics, graphic novels, and alternative political cartoons. SPX is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit that brings together more than 650 artists and publishers to meet their readers, booksellers, and distributors each year. Graphic novels, mini comics, and alternative comics will all be on display and for sale by their authors and illustrators. The expo includes a series of panel discussions and interviews with this year's guests.
 
The Ignatz Award is a festival prize held every year at SPX recognizing outstanding achievement in comics and cartooning, with the winners chosen by attendees at the show.
 
As in previous years, profits from the SPX will go to support the SPX Graphic Novel Gift Program, which funds graphic novel purchases for public and academic libraries, as well as the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF), which protects the First Amendment rights of comic book readers and professionals. For more information on the CBLDF, visit their website at http://www.cbldf.org. For more information on the Small Press Expo, please visit http://www.smallpressexpo.com.