Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Wildly OT, but amusing: Hustler cartoonist's blog

Dan Collins just wrote in, "I recently started my own cartoon blog. I've been a full time professional cartoonist since 1976."

Dan's work certainly fits into the Secret History of Comics - as he notes on his site, "Those cartoons have no doubt shown up in the inboxes of most of you at one time or another. Just look for the 'collins' at the bottom. If only I had a nickel every time they did."

I'm sure I've seen Dan's work that way too, but his blog is darned funny.

Express reviews Complete Peanuts 11

See "This One Goes to 11: 'The Complete Peanuts 1971-1972'," by Express contributor Ewa Beaujon, Express (March 30 2009). I think this was online only. Anyone know?

OT: Donna Barstow, editorial cartoonist

Donna found me while looking for Dave Astor (sorry Dave!) and sent the following PR in, but she also noted "there are only 2 other women in [UCLICK's editorial group (over 60), and it's quite a switch to go from magazine gag cartoons to editorials (although I'm still doing mag cartoons mostly)! I'm hugely enjoying the challenge, but haven't gotten much feedback yet." So check her out on Slate (which actually offers you the opportunity to "Buy Donna Barstow for your Web, wireless or print publication." Is this the next step in cartooning?

She's also got a new New Yorker blog, "Why I did It".


Editorial Cartoonist Donna Barstow Brings Fresh, Original Voice to UCLICK® Website GoComics.com

Kansas City, MO (February 24, 2009) - Editorial cartoonist and acclaimed blogger Donna Barstow is bringing her signature style to GoComics.com, the popular Uclick comic strip and editorial cartoon portal that is home to some of the nation’s most renowned cartoonists.

Barstow’s new feature will update two to three times per week, putting on full display the unique commentary that has made her cartoons a hit on the pages of widely-read newspapers and periodicals such as Parade, The New Yorker, Harvard Business Review, the Los Angeles Times, and Glamour, among others. She has 2 books in print of cartoons for women, and her cartoon on food has run for several years in mainstream and alternative papers, including Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, Salt Lake Tribune, Albany Times Union, Pasadena Weekly, and more.

Barstow approaches her job as an editorial cartoonist in a way that differs from the political myopia that sometimes dominates the field.

“I try to see more of the positive in the news,” said Barstow. “It’s important to have a point of view, but does it have to be fatalistic? I try and bring light to a subject even though I might loathe it.”

While the focus of Barstow’s feature will usually fall on politics, the cartoonist expects a large dose of pop culture to work its way into the mix as well, all filtered through the lens of her own perspective.

“Living in Hollywood, I can’t help but be influenced by entertainment, and yes, sadly, the drama of it all,” said Barstow. “I’m originally from the East Coast, so I definitely see the conflict and layers in East vs. West coast culture! It’s a challenge I enjoy, letting my opinions be known.”

Barstow joins a star-studded lineup of editorial cartoonists on GoComics.com. The site features 27 Pulitzer Prize winners, including Pat Oliphant, Mike Luckovich, Matt Davies, David Horsey, Mike Ramirez and more.

“Donna paints the world in shades most of us don’t even consider,” said Douglas Edwards, Uclick CEO. “She brings an original point of view and an instantly recognizable cartooning style to her work, not to mention her brilliant wit. She’s a great fit for the GoComics community.”

Check out Donna Barstow’s cartoons at GoComics.com/DonnaBarstow.
GoComics.com is owned and operated by digital entertainment provider Uclick, America's #1 provider of comics on the web and on mobile phones.

About UCLICK:
UCLICK® is the leading digital entertainment provider of humor, comic strips, manga, graphic novels, editorial cartoons, and other content for desktop, web and mobile phones. Uclick is also the leading creator and distributor of crosswords, and other word and number puzzles. Partners featuring Uclick content include the leading consumer portals Yahoo!, MSNBC.com, New York Times, Slate.com, washingtonpost.com, CNN, USA Today, and AOL. Uclick features include the top brand franchises Garfield, Doonesbury, Calvin and Hobbes, Paul Frank, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, TOKYOPOP, USA Today, Pat Sajak, Wyland, and many more. Uclick creative content and services are available through the GoComics.com website, U.S. mobile phone operators, the iTunes App Store, and other distributors worldwide. UCLICK, LLC is a division of Andrews McMeel Universal, the leading newspaper syndicate and publisher of humor books and calendars in North America.

For more information on Uclick, visit www.uclick.com.

Monday, March 30, 2009

OT: Cartooning in Africa book now available

I saw John Lent yesterday and got a copy of his new book, Cartooning in Africa. It's an edited volume of essays on Africa as a whole, Angola, Algeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Southern Africa, South Africa, Tunisia and Tanzania. Here's the description lifted from Amazon's site:

Product Description
This volume documents from historical and contemporary perspectives, the situations, trends and issues of cartooning in a number of African countries, and profiles the individuals, forms and phenomena that stand out. All types of cartooning are covered, including comic books, comic strips, gag and political cartoons, and humour magazines.
Product Details

* Paperback: 383 pages
* Publisher: Hampton Press (October 2008)
* Language: English
* ISBN-10: 1572735546
* ISBN-13: 978-1572735545

Malaria Moe cartoons on Flickr

088266-32
My colleague at the Medical Museum put up a bunch of scans of World War 2 Malaria Moe propaganda cartoons on Flickr today. The artist, Frank Mack, later went on to work for Ripley's Believe It Or Not.

Dave Astor's idea for jobless editorial cartoonists

It's a doozy.

That Darn Auth

Tom Toles isn't the only editorial cartoonist that gets complaints at the Post. Even though he works for a Philly paper, Tony Auth came in for this gripe, although he was unnamed. The accompanying cartoon was signed.


Catholicism Under Attack
Washington Post Saturday, March 28, 2009; A11

Of all the cartoons published last week, why did you choose one that is anti-Catholic for Drawing Board on March 21? Not only was it offensive, but its implications were false.

The cartoon showed Pope Benedict XVI in an AIDS ward saying, "Blessed are the sick, for they have not used condoms." The implication was that condoms would reduce the incidence of AIDS.

However, no less an authority than Edward C. Green, a senior research scientist at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, was quoted as saying in National Review Online last week that "we have found no consistent associations between condom use and lower HIV-infection rates."

When asked to comment on a statement by Pope Benedict XVI on AIDS, Green said that the pope is correct, "or put it a better way, the best evidence we have supports the pope's comments."

The implication of the cartoon that the pope does not care about the plight of AIDS victims was insulting and outrageously untrue. What other group can match the care given to AIDS victims throughout the world by Catholic institutions and health-care workers?

-- Robert H. Follett
Lansdowne

Post drops, shrinks comics

The Post introduced its new 2 comics pages today. The strips are about 1/4 smaller. They justified themselves in several places recently. First the ombudsman, and then the managing editors:

"Why Monday's Post Will Look a Lot Different,"
By Andrew Alexander
Washington Post Sunday, March 29, 2009; A11

Another [way to cut costs] is to trim the physical size of the paper. The savings can be substantial.

A single page of newsprint in the daily Post, with its 650,000 circulation, costs roughly $2,500. A single page on Sundays, with its 870,000 circulation, costs about $3,500.

Shaving two pages from each daily and Sunday paper can save close to $2 million a year. ...

Reducing the number of comics and games was a simple matter of gauging reader preferences. The Post uses an outside firm to regularly question more than 3,000 adults in the Washington area and also conducts its own surveys. To evaluate the comics and games, adults were asked which ones they read, and adults with children were asked which ones their kids read.

Those scoring at the bottom with both adults and kids got the ax.

So, by that logic, if you cut printing the paper out completely at 100 pages (guesstimate for an average day) X $2,500 = $250,000/page/day. Multiple that by the 650,000 copies you print and you can save $162 billion dollars a day! They may have solved the economic crisis!

Ask The Post: Liz Spayd and Raju Narisetti, Washington Post Managing Editors
Monday, March 30, 2009; 12:00 PM

The Washington Post's managing editors, Raju Narisetti and Liz Spayd were online Monday, March 30 at 12 p.m. ET to discuss the recent changes and enhancements in both the newspaper and Web site. They will also answer your questions about the current state of the news industry.

Anonymous: "For all the choices we are making, we have used reader surveys to make sure we keep the features that are most popular."

Does that include comics? Because I never saw one, and I'm a faithful reader.

How was the decision made to drop six current, ongoing strips while keeping Peanuts reruns and tired old "zombie" strips that might as well be reruns, such as Family Circus, Garfield, Beetle Bailey, Mark Trail, and Dennis the Menace. those strips should have been put our of their (and our) miserry years ago.

Sacred cows, anyone?

Raju Narisetti and Liz Spayd: We do regular readership surveys both on the phone and in-person and the comics that moved online were the least popular with our readers.

_______________________

Silver Spring, Md.: Why don't you put Gene Weingarten in charge of the Comics section?

Raju Narisetti and Liz Spayd: We are putting it on our list of things to ask Gene!!

Sunday, March 29, 2009

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 04-01-09

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 04-01-09
By John Judy


AGENTS OF ATLAS #3 by Jeff Parker, Clayton Henry and Gabriel Hardman. Fighting commies back in The Day and everyone else in the Here and Now, these vintage super-folk just don’t know when to quit! A must for all aficionados of robots and talking gorillas!

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #590 by Dan Slott and Barry Kitson. Lots of doings in the Spider-verse, with a guest appearance by the Fantastic Four!

ANGEL: BLOOD AND TRENCHES #2 written and drawn by John Byrne. Oddly enough, both the best Angel story and best work from John Byrne in quite a while. Reminiscent of the TV show in all the ways his latest series isn’t. Good stuff.

AVENGERS/INVADERS #9 of 12 Alex Ross, Jim Kreuger and Steve Sadowski. Still coming out.

BATMAN: BATTLE FOR THE COWL: MAN-BAT #1 by Joe Harris and Jim Calafiore. Between you and me, that cowl ain’t gonna fit.

BLACK PANTHER #3 by Reginald Hudlin and Ken Lashley. While T’Challa heals the mysterious new lady Panther continues her quest to even some scores.

THE BOYS #29 by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson. The dark secret of the G-Men is exposed at last! Not for kids.

BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER #24 by Jim Krueger and Cliff Richards. A Faith/Giles titanic team-up! Here’s hoping they take down the Dollhouse!

CAPTAIN AMERICA COMICS 70th ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL #1 by Joe Simon, Jack Kirby, James Robinson and Marcos Martin. A look back to Steve Rogers’ pre-Super Soldier days and a classic tale from Cap’s legendary creators. Recommended!

THE DESTROYER #1 of 5 by Robert Kirkman and Cory Walker. Legendary WWII hero Keen Marlowe (swear to god) is dying and with a name like “The Destroyer” he’s kind of obliged to take as many nefarious nogoodniks with him as he can. From the creator of WALKING DEAD and MARVEL ZOMBIES so you know it’s gonna be a twisty ride. Gotta look!

FLASH: REBIRTH #1 of 5 by Geoff Johns and Ethan Van Sciver. Barry’s back. Must Have!

GLAMOURPUSS #6 written and drawn by Dave Sim. For anyone interested in tracking CEREBUS creator Dave Sim’s inexorable path to the rubber room.

JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA #25 by Geoff Johns and Jerry Ordway. At last! The big smack-down with Black Adam and Mighty Isis!

MY MOMMY IS IN AMERICA AND SHE MET BUFFALO BILL HC by Jean Regnaud and Emile Bravo. The English translation of the award-winning French graphic novel about the postcards a young French boy receives from his mother who’s off “traveling the world.” Recommended for readers age ten and up.

PREVIEWS by Diamond and Marvel Comics. To help you plan what to do with your bail-out money!

SCALPED #27 by Jason Aaron and Francesco Francavilla. Ladies and Gentlemen: FBI Agent Baylis Earl Nitz! May want to wear a rain poncho because this one’s gonna get wet! Highly recommended. Not for kids.

SEAGUY: THE SLAVES OF MICKEY EYE #1 of 3 by Grant Morrison and Cameron Stewart. And speaking of “wet” here’s more of the cartoon madness that is Grant Morrison. Hey, it’s only three issues. I mean, “Darn it!”

www.johnjudy.net

Saturday, March 28, 2009

Newseum offering news?

Bruce Guthrie sent in this link to a story about Brenda Starr on the Newseum's website - "A Starr Is Mourned," By Sharon Shahid, senior Web editor, Newseum March 26, 2009.

While the comics are certainly part of a newspaper (take that, Washington Post), I have no idea why the Newseum would be devoting a writer to this given that they probably don't have anything about Brenda Starr on display.

Zadzooks on Resident Evil vidoegame, Bennet on Ambush Bug

"Zadzooks: Resident Evil 5 review," Joseph Szadkowski, Washington Times Wednesday, March 25, 2009 and "Bennett's Best for the week of March 22," By Greg Bennett, Zadzooks Blog March 26 2009. Greg recommends Ambush Bug, a comic I love.

OT: Ellen Lindner's new book

My friend Stephen Betts married a cartoonist - Ellen Lindner - and her new book Undertow is out.

You can buy a copy at Lulu.com for less than $12. Ellen describes it as:

Undertow by Ellen Lindner gives us a close-up view through the back door of Brooklyn in the sixties—with all the delinquency, drugs, and trips to Coney Island that implies. Beautifully drawn in sinuous, sharp style, Lindner's characters, and their fight to do more than survive, are unforgettable.

Although she's too young to remember Brooklyn in the 1960s. Actually, so am I. I just ordered mine to see what I missed.

April 30: Jules & Kate Feiffer at Politics and Prose

10:30 am for Which Puppy?, a children's book.

March 30: Kal on Maryland public television

Kal's sent a note in...

On March 30, Maryland Public television will air the terrific documentary "Citizen Schaefer". The show follows the formidable career of the colorful Maryland politician William Donald Schaefer. For 50 years Schaefer reigned as a larger than life character in Maryland politics serving as Baltimore city councilman, President of the city Council, Baltimore city Mayor, state Governor and Comptroller.

Schaefer's flamboyant style and paper thin skin also made him a gift for cartoonists and caricaturists. During the course of my 17 year stint as editorial cartoonist for the Baltimore Sun, I had ample opportunity to lampoon Hizzoner in pen and ink... much to his chagrin.

For the MPT documentary, I was approached to share some cartoons and stories about the Schaefer years. I was also commissioned to create a selection of short animations to act as chapter headings for the documentary. The clips were designed to look as if they were my black and white cartoons on the page of the newspaper coming alive.

The animations are assembled together in the short film that you can view here: http://www.youtube.com/politicalcartoons

Hagen exhibit

I went last night and met David and his family including his wife and inlaws who were all from England and fun to talk with. The exhibit is in 2 rooms of a real-estate firm, but that works surprisingly well. There's a variety of works including paintings of robots, odd animals and baseball players from a 1966 card set as well as some prints. I bought a cartoony portrait of S*p*rm*n. Go check it out!

Thursday, March 26, 2009

David Hagen visits his exhibit tomorrow night...


...and you can too!

The show will be from the beginning of March through the end of April with a reception on Friday, March 27 from 6pm to 9pm. All invited. Refreshments served! Century21 gallery space, 1711 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22209.


I'll be there tomorrow, fairly close to 6. And I hear a cartoonist known as RT will be making an appearance.

Express recommends Cherry Blossom Festival Anime tomorrow

Manga Manga Manga! Cherry Blossom Festival Anime Marathon

Vexille SATURDAY: Washington is so weird. We welcome in spring with a kite festival and an anime marathon. Next you'll be telling us about some giant rabbit that lays eggs and might have pastel-colored fur.

The Freer Gallery will show four anime films on Saturday, including "Vexille," about a futuristic Japan that has cut itself off from the world. Tickets are free, and the films are short, fun and lovely. If you can get over the guilt of spending a beautiful spring Saturday inside.

» Freer Gallery of Art, Jefferson Drive and 12th St. NW; Sat., March 28, 11 a.m., free; 202-633-1000. (Smithsonian)
Posted By Fiona Zublin at 7:00 AM on March 27, 2009

Kal at Walters in Baltimore

Cub reporter Rick Banning tells us about a Walters exhibit, "In the 3rd floor of the old building, a map of Word history, 12 feet wide x 6 feet high, has 8 cartoon features by Kal such as the inventions of printing and paper."

Groening and Simpsons in the Onion

Groening and Simpsons are in the paper Onion, but the online versions are longer - see "In a way, they're all winners: 10 Simpsons episodes from the past 5 seasons that stand among the series' best." by Genevieve Koski, Kyle Ryan, and Steve Heisler, Onion AV Club March 23, 2009 and an excellent interview, "Matt Groening," by Kyle Ryan, Onion AV Club March 25, 2009.

In the Examiner, Comic Art Indigene was selected as the Best Gallery Show of the weekend.

City Paper Best of DC 2009 out; Comics News fails to place

The City Paper Best of DC 2009 is out, but Comics News failed to place this year. However, they didn't have a Best (Comic) Art Blogger, and Wonkette won the best blogger, so I guess I'll survive. So much for the hat trick though...

Waltz with Bashir animator at Hirshhorn Museum tonight!

Hirshhorn Films: An evening with David Polonsky

8 pm, March 26 in the Ring Auditorium. Free

Craig Yoe Appearance at Politics & Prose

Craig Yoe, author of Secret Identity: The Fetish Art of Superman's Co-Creator Joe Shuster, will be doing a discussion and book signing at Politics and Prose on April 24, 2009 at 7pm.




Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Kal cartoons in Maryland Public TV documentary

They appear in Citizen Schaefer , a film about the former governor, according to this article.

Another award for Nate Beeler

Examiner cartoonist Nate Beeler apparently won first place for editorial cartooning in the Virginia Press Association awards - if this is the proper citation:

D3: Editorial cartoons
Place: 1
Name: Nate Beeler
Publication: The Washington Examiner
City: Washington
Subject: 20/20 Insight
Comments: Beautiful artwork, humor and message. Nate's cartoons are among the best in the nation.

May 4: Art Spiegelman at the Corcoran

I've seen him give this talk before and it's good.

May 4, Monday 7 p.m. at the Corcoran

Art Spiegelman: Comix 101

Members $20; Public $25

Art Spiegelman has almost single-handedly brought comic books out of the toy closet and onto the literature shelves. His comics are best known for their shifting graphic style, their formal complexity, and controversial content. In 1992, his masterful Holocaust narrative Maus won the Pulitzer Prize, and Maus II continued the remarkable story of his parents' survival of the Nazi regime. The New York Times Book
Review listed Spiegelman's In the Shadow of No Towers among the most Notable Books of 2004. On this evening, Spiegelman takes the audience on a chronological tour of the evolution of comics all the while explaining the value of this medium and why it should not be ignored.

The Argentina Copello Dudley Memorial Lecture, established in 1984, supported by the Dudley Endowment Fund, presents distinguished speakers who have contributed significantly to our understanding of the arts.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

OT: Call for Papers--Graphic Novels in Libraries and Archives: Ideas and Issues.

Posted at Rob's request.

Call for Papers--Graphic Novels in Libraries and Archives: Ideas and Issues.

Graphic Novel publishing has exploded in the last decade. While, during the mid-1990s, it might have been possible for even a modestly budgeted library to acquire much of the published Graphic Novel output, now it is almost impossible even for libraries with big budgets to afford EVERYTHING published in this format. What was once considered a “cult” of devoted Graphic Novel readers and fans is now a part of the mainstream of readers. Graphic Novels is the one area of publishing that continues to grow year by year.

I am looking for essays that deal specifically with how libraries and archives have dealt with and are dealing with Graphic Novels in their collections. What are the various issues that have come up in regard to carrying Graphic Novels? What solutions, if any, did your library find?

Some of the topics that could be addressed in this book might include:

· Comics in Archives

· Real world issues in censorship of Graphic Novels - a case study on how a particular library or libraries dealt with challenged books

· How are academic libraries dealing with Graphic Novels?

· Promoting Graphic Novels collections in public libraries - Graphic Novel book clubs

· Problems collecting floppy comics in libraries and archives

· History of collecting comics and Graphic Novels in libraries

· Reaching out to Young Adults with Graphic Novels

· Senior library patrons and Graphic Novels - nobody has ever addressed this issue

· Graphic Novel - the term itself - problems with semantics for librarians?????

· Faculty who teach comics/Graphic Novels in other departments (say English/Sociology) and their relationship to their liaison librarian

· Graphic Novels in Libraries: Philosophical Issues

· Problems related to shelving Graphic Novels! Young Adult – Teen - Non Fiction - All Together?

· Manga/Anime vs. Superhero books in Libraries - Which is most popular?

· How to preserve Graphic Novels and comics in archives?

· Extending the shelve life of Graphic Novels in public libraries?

· How the boom of Hollywood movies, based upon graphic literature, affected library use.

· Metadata and Graphic Novels

· Web comics: implications for the library.

· History of comics in libraries

· The story of those Mexican/Spanish Photo novellas in libraries

· Any other topic related to Graphic Novels and libraries will be considered.

· META-DATA and Graphic Novels



Please send a 200 word abstract by April 31, 2009. Final due date for essays is June 31, 2009.

Final essays should be between 3,000-9,000 words long, including endnotes and bibliography, and should be done in Chicago Manuel of Style parenthetical with endnotes. Please keep in mind that these essays will be Peer Reviewed, and any essay that is not up to standard may not see final publication.

Please email me if you have any questions.

Rob Weiner
Humanities Librarian
Texas Tech University
Lubbock, Texas

Rob.Weiner@ttu.edu

Rweiner5@sbcglobal.net

April 25: Library Workshop: Creating Graphic Novels

Aaarghh! Within blocks of me and I'll be at the History of Medicine meetings in Cleveland. I'll have to send the kid.

Workshop: Creating Graphic Novels
Sat Apr 25, 2009 1pm
Columbia Pike Branch Library, 816 S. Walter Reed Dr., Arlington, Va.

Learn the basic and finer points of creating graphic novels from Josh Elder, a graphic novelist and author of "Mail Order Ninja." Appropriate for students ages 10 and up. Contact mmiller@arlingtonva.us or call 703-228-5261 for more details.

And I'm missing the Library sale.

Matt Wuerker wants you to remember the Exxon Valdez oil spill 20 years later...

...and that seems reasonable to me. He says, "take two minutes to remember with John Nielsen's WWF piece, posted here on youtube - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbjC9SMKClE - and pass it on...

KAL illustrations for Frontline tonight?


Today's NY Times has a KAL cartoon that they say is from the Frontline documentary "Ten Trillion and Counting" on tv tonight.

March 25: Library of Congress Swann talk on Nast

Coming up tomorrow!

Thomas Nast and French Art
The Topic of Swann Grantee’s Talk on March 25

Swann Foundation grantee Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire will present a lecture entitled, "The Artist as Translator: Thomas Nast and French Art,” Wednesday, March 25, 2009, at 12 noon, in the West Dining Room on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, DC.

In her illustrated talk, Delamaire will examine American cartoonist Thomas Nast’s appropriation of the visual language used in prints and photographs of grand manner and history paintings in his political cartoons of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. The analysis of Nast’s cartoons suggests that they functioned much like visual, cultural, and political translations of the era’s leading issues and articulated the cartoonist’s artistic identity.

Thomas Nast (1840-1902) began his career as a newspaper illustrator in the antebellum era for the growing illustrated press of the 1850s in New York. During the Civil War years, Nast developed a new style of large-scale cartoons that made extensive use of the visual vocabulary of old masters and contemporary French academic painters, particularly those whose works were reproduced in prints then being disseminated by the American branch of Goupil & Cie in New York. Nast referenced or alluded to specific French paintings as a means of capturing and engaging his viewers’ interest in major political developments of the day as seen in such cartoons as “Democracy” or “The Tammany Tiger Loose” (published respectively in Harper’s Weekly on November 11, 1865 and November 11, 1871). In so doing, Nast not only translated “facts into black and white,” as suggested by Clarence Cook (Putnam Magazine, July 1869), but also transformed history painting into a mass medium and appropriated the significance of foreign images into the American national or local political sphere.

Delamaire contends that looking closely at Nast’s cartoons demonstrates that the artist deliberately emphasized the discontinuity between the original painting and his final image in order to construct the cartoon’s underlying meaning. Nast’s translations of history paintings into cartoons can thus be seen to question the authority and priority commonly associated with the grand tradition of European history painting. Delamaire suggests that Nast’s appropriations reveal a shift from his role as a newspaper illustrator to that of a translator of fine art’s visual language mediating the political significance of foreign works of art widely
disseminated in print form to his American audience.

Delamaire is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at Columbia University. Her dissertation project entitled, “Art in Translation: Franco-American exchanges in the Civil War and Reconstruction Era,” has been awarded a Terra Foundation Pre-doctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution and a Swann Foundation grant. Her research interests focus on transnational exchanges in relation to the development of reproductive technology in nineteenth century visual culture, the international art market and the emerging apparatus of international exhibitions. She completed a Master’s Degree in Egyptian Archaeology. She has published several essays on the American perception of ancient Egypt, the 1867 Paris Exposition Universelle, and the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial International Exhibition.

This presentation is part of the Swann Foundation’s continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The Swann Foundation’s advisory board is composed of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members. The foundation strives to award one fellowship annually (with a stipend of up to $15,000) to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. Applications for the academic year 2009-2010 are due Feb. 15, 2010. More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swannhome or by emailing swann@loc.gov.

Weingarten on his comic strip, and the Post's

Gene W from the March 23rd chat:

Silver Spring, Md.: Re: Doonesbury CPOW - that's one thing that has always impressed me about that strip - he always seems to have a character already in place for any news event or trend or whatever that comes up. He can pick up a character and put he or she in the event without any problem or stretch. He has Joannie working on the hill, BD was set for any "hostilities", Bernie was perfectly positioned to be a high-tech mogul, Boopsie ended up in the movie industry. I loved it when Mike's youngish techie-wife turned out to be the Vietnamese orphan who had been adopted into the US years before.

Gene Weingarten: Obviously, this is not coincidence. Garry has more active characters than any strip ever, probably by a factor of five.

The strip my son and I are working on -- look for it soon, I hope -- is going to start with about 16. Absurdly high for a new strip, nowhere near Dbury.

_______________________

New strip: When your new strip debuts, can it replace Peanuts?

If you were able to, say, accidentally slip the email address of the comics editor, perhaps it may result that he or she is bombarded with enough requests to get rid of Peanuts repeats that his or her loins will be girded sufficiently to withstand the few complaint letters that will be mailed (from people who I don't think would folow through on their threat to cancel their subscriptions).

Gene Weingarten: I am beginning to think that no one will ever have the courage to replace Peanuts.

_______________________

Washington, D.C.: AAAAAHHHHH! According to the notice on today's Style section, they're schwacking both "Pooche Cafe" and "Brevity" from the comics section. What's wrong with these people? They'll keep stale stuff like "Blondie," "Peanuts," "Mark Trail," "Family Circus," and "Dennis the Menace" but kill two of the comics that are actually, you know, funny? Isn't there anything we can do to stop this? AAAAAHHHHHH!!!

Gene Weingarten: They are also keeping Hagar the Horrible.

_______________________

Alex., VA: Do readers actually write in and support Peanuts?

Gene Weingarten: I don't know, but I doubt it. I think that newspaper comics deciders are loath to get rid of any strip so old that old loyal readers would miss it.

Very, very bad decisionmaking.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Cavna animator interview on Post website, so you don't have to buy the paper

"The Interview: Animator Bryan Brinkman," Michael Cavna, March 23, 2009.

Post dropping 6 comics, not 5

Today the Post reported that it's dropping 6 comics - adding "Brevity" to the list of "Judge Parker," "Little Dog Lost," "Piranha Club," "Pooch Cafe" and "Zippy the Pinhead" - and shrinking the comics pages to 2 instead of 3. Dilbert is moving back to the comics section as the Business section goes down the tubes.

Comments are invited at comics@washpost.com

I'm sure they'll be announcing a price increase any day too. You know - this pisses me off - I actually subscribe to the paper and pay to get it and its ads, and they keep taking out stuff I read, but still offering it free on the web. Nice business model. Perhaps Madoff gave lessons on running newspapers too.

And for god's sake, drop Peanuts rather than a living strip. I loved it, I buy the Fantagraphics collections, and I don't need it in place of a current strip.

[I just made the last two paragraphs the core of my letter to the Post]

Sunday, March 22, 2009

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 03-25-09

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 03-25-09
By John Judy

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #589 by Fred Van Lente and Paulo Siqueira. Spidey’s old foe The Spot is breaking into the murder-for-hire biz. Don’t judge. It’s a bad economy and we’ve all gotta go where the work is.

AMERICAN JESUS, VOL. 1: CHOSEN SC by Mark Millar and Peter Gross. From the Department of Things That Can (and probably will) Go Horribly Wrong, it’s the story of a twelve year-old boy who discovers he’s the returned Jesus Christ with all the perks and liabilities. Did I mention it’s written by the guy who wrote ULTIMATES and KICK-ASS? Gotta look! (Especially if you’re from a right-wing fundie censorship organization!)

CAPTAIN AMERICA #48 by Ed Brubaker and Butch Guice. Bucky America, the Sub-Mariner and the Black Widow continue their unauthorized covert aggression against the Chinese super-scientist who done ‘em wrong. Guest-starring the original dead Human Torch.

DAREDEVIL #117 by Ed Brubaker and Michael Lark. Daredevil returns to his own comic book and the Kingpin returns to the Big Apple! DD’s and KP’s latest gal-pals just got all messed up so there’s bound to be some tension. Recommended.

IMMORTAL IRON FIST #24 by Duane Swierczynski and Kano. Bad as all get-out kung-fu mayhem as only an artist with one name can draw it!

MIGHTY AVENGERS #23 by Dan Slott and Khoi Pham. A new Avengers line-up is revealed in the traditional manner: Big Fight!

NEW AVENGERS #51 by Brian Michael Bendis and Billy Tan. As Sorcerer Supreme it appears ol’ Doc Strange just hasn’t been cutting the mustard as of late so it’s time for a big old magical Ruckus Royale to find a new one. Look for lots of gobbledy-gook, magic-looking letter fonts. Don’t strain your eyes, just assume it rhymes and sounds cool if Ian McKellen’s reading it.

THUNDERBOLTS #130 by Andy Diggle and Bong Dazo. Screw the comic book, don’t you wish your name was “Bong Dazo?”

TOP TEN SPECIAL #1 by Xander Cannon and Da Xiong. It’s a little courtroom drama in the City of Super-Heroes. Recommended even without Alan Moore scripting.

WOLVERINE SAGA #1 by No Credits. It’s the story of the fast-healing mutant Canucklehead James Howlett/Logan/Wolverine/Patch or whatever he’s calling himself today and get this: It’s Free. No charge. On the House of Ideas. You’d almost think there was a big-budget action movie someone was trying to promote…

WOLVERINE: FIRST CLASS #13 by Peter David and Ronan Cliquet. Okay, so “Ronan Cliquet” is no “Bong Dazo” but it’s up there. Are these the Sarah Palin kids nobody talks about?

www.johnjudy.net

Another Batcave Companion interview

See "Batman in the '60s & '70s: 'The Batcave Companion'," By Zack Smith, Newsarama 20 March 2009.

Zadzooks and Bennett's Best

Zadzooks is on toys again - "Zadzooks: Predator: The Cleaner and Darth Vader's T.I.E. Fighter," Joseph Szadkowski, Washington Times Wednesday, March 18, 2009.

And Greg recommends some old DC, a new Vertigo title and Humbug -

"Bennett's Best for the week of March 15," By Greg Bennett, Zadzooks Blog March 20 2009.

"Bennett's Best for the week of March 8," By Greg Bennett, Zadzooks Blog March 19 2009.

Saturday, March 21, 2009

Frederick's Mike Imboden interviewed

See:

Episode 89: Jimmy Gownley - Mike Imboden
Comixology's It Came Out On Wednesday blog March 11, 2009

In the sixth New York Comic Con 2009 special podcast, we're joined by Amelia Rules creator Jimmy Gownley and by Mike Imboden, creator of Fist of Justice from Digital Webbing.

Wuerker to speak in Lebanon Valley

According to their website:

Cartoonist to Examine the Funny Side of Terror at LVC's Colloquium

Political cartoonist Matt Wuerker will look at The Funny Side of the Age of Terror as part of Lebanon Valley College’s Age of Terror Colloquium. He will speak on Friday, April 3 at 7 p.m. in LVC’s Zimmerman Recital Hall in the Suzanne H. Arnold Gallery. His talk is free and open to the public.

Wuerker will ask: “Do we have to be terrorized? Given all the troubles and tensions of the world perhaps humor is a better response.” Wuerker, a cartoonist for politico.com, will make his case that the war on terror might best be waged with satire. “Besides helping us not lose our own minds and own civil liberties, perhaps humor is the best response to those that would make us into monsters,” he believes. “Laughter can be disarming, and in many ways it is the most civilized way to attack those people that despise our civilization. Besides, if we turn them into jokes it will drive them crazy.”

April 1: Barry Kitson Signing at Cards, Comics & Collectibles of Reisterstown, MD

Barry Kitson Signing at Cards, Comics & Collectibles of Reisterstown, MD

REISTERSTOWN, MD - MARCH 18, 2009 - Barry Kitson, artist of Marvel Comics' Amazing Spider-Man, will appear at Cards, Comics & Collectibles of Reisterstown, MD on Wednesday April 1, 2009. No joke!

Barry, whose work on Amazing Spider-Man includes the first story in the best-selling "Obama issue" #583, has had his work published in many titles, including runs on Marvel's The Order and Secret Invasion: Fantastic Four and DC's Legion of Super-Heroes, The Titans, and Empire.

The signing will be held on Wednesday, April 1, 2009 from 3pm to 7:30pm. Our address is 100 A Chartley Dr., Reisterstown, MD 21136. For more information, call Cards, Comics & Collectibles at 410-526-7410.

May 1st starts our 25th year!

March 23: Chabon at GWU

From GWU's English Dept blog (!)

Thursday, February 26, 2009
For Your Calendar: Chabon and Jones (March 23)
The author of The Yiddish Policemen's Union, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, Summerland, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh -- and MORE -- will read from his work and then be interviewed live by Professor Faye Moskowitz.

Michael Chabon will be introduced by Edward P. Jones, GW's first Wang Professor of Contemporary Literature.

The event begins at 7 PM on Monday March 23 in the Jack Morton Auditorium, and is followed by a book signing for both Chabon and Jones. Free and open to all who wish to attend, but seating is on a first-available basis.

The auditorium is in the School of Media and Public Affairs, 805 21st Street, NW Washington, DC 20052

OT: David Lozell Martin's book signing on Sunday that I'm going to

My friend the novelist David Lozell Martin will be reading from his new autobiography. I'll be going to Shirlington tomorrow if anyone wants to meet up.


Busboys @ Shirlington
4251 South Campbell Ave
Arlington, VA 22206
(703) 379-9757

Author Event: David Lozell Martin
When Sunday, March 22, 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Where Shirlington Library/Busboys and Poets

Description Author David Lozell Martin will discuss and sign his most recent work, "Losing Everything: A Memoir". "Losing Everything" is less about getting lost and more about finding your way home again. In his pursuit of stability, Martin uncovered lessons that might help others who have encountered loss: take pleasure in something as small as an ampersand, keep a list of people you know who have died, meet your own death like a warrior, and be glad you don't own a monkey. Deeply personal yet surprisingly universal, Martin's story is for anyone who has wandered astray. If not a road map, his journey is a guide, providing hard-earned wisdom to illuminate the path home. Discussion will take place at Shirlington Library, followed by a book signing at Busboys and Poets.

This event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

My thoughts on Watchmen

So I finally saw the Watchmen movie last night. For years, I've been saying that 1.) this is not a comic book to recommend to a beginning reader of comics and 2.) I don't know who'd they'd expect to see this movie because you really have to care about superheroes.

I stand by those statements.

I also enjoyed the movie, but I've been reading comic books for over thirty years.

I liked it fine for what it was - a lavish, yet slavish, adaptation of a comic book of limited interest to a broader public.

Snyder's second comic book adaptation followed the path of 300, his first - he used the comic book as a storyboard and made a visually-stunning movie. Watchmen is lush and lovely and just ooozes thoughtful caring. And I appreciated that. And about 1/3 of the readers of this blog probably will as well.

But if you didn't grow up on superhero comic books (movies don't count), this probably isn't the movie for you.

Richmond's Adhouse Books has another sweeet one coming out

See "Pixar & Comics - Ronnie del Carmen on 'And There Your Are'," By Chris Arrant, Newsarama 18 March 2009. Publisher Pitzer is usually at SPX with a pile of lovelies.

Geppi's Museum baseball game discount

I've said it before, but I love this museum.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date of Release: March 19, 2009

Geppi’s Entertainment Museum announces dollar-day admission during Orioles’ and Ravens’ 2009 home games

BALTIMORE – With families more challenged than ever to find economical forms of entertainment, Geppi’s Entertainment Museum at Camden Yards (“GEM”) has stepped up to the plate with a budget-pleasing offer. On any day that the Os or Ravens have home games scheduled this year, admission to the museum – located adjacent to Oriole Park – will be only $1.

“This special offer is an unbeatable value,” said GEM’s Executive Director, Melissa Bowersox, “Our hours of operation will be extended on home game days to allow individuals and families to experience America’s most exciting pop culture museum at a very affordable price. Whether you’re attending a game or just in the area, the admission will be only a dollar.”

A tour guide is required for all groups availing themselves of the Game Day Special. An additional $1 per person tour-guide fee will be added to admission, for a total of $2 per person. Groups at this rate must adhere to guided-tour times of 10:30 a.m., 2 p.m. and 3:30pm. This rate is valid on HOME Game Days only for the Baltimore Orioles 2009 season and Baltimore Ravens 2009 season, and is valid for one group per tour time.

Other discounts available at GEM include; half-price Tuesdays and Thursdays. Last year, GEM introduced half-price Tuesdays, and it proved so popular, a second half-price day – Thursday – was added.

GEM also offers $2 off admission to those who “go green” with transportation and show a public transportation ticket when entering GEM (not valid with any other offers or discounts).

Geppi’s Entertainment Museum at Camden Yards is located on the second floor at 301 W. Camden St., Baltimore, MD 21201. For additional information call 410-625-7060, email info@geppismuseum.com or log on to www.geppismuseum.com.

Editorial cartoonist Bill Day let go, interviewed at Comic Riffs

See "The Exit Interview: Pink-Slipped Memphis Cartoonist Bill Day," By Michael Cavna, Washington Post Comic Riffs blog March 19, 2009. I believe it's becoming apparent that firing your cartoonist is becoming a fad at newspapers, and publishers are doing it now because everyone else is.

Horrors of War story preview available

Troy Allen writes in:

Switching it up this week. I figured I'd treat you kids to a preview page of "Disposable Heroes," A short story by the Bamn crew. It is slated to be featured in the "The Horrors of War" anthology book, presented by Dr. Dremo's Taphouse (R.I.P.) and the fine people of the DC Conspiracy.

The premise for the short is based on a true life account...but, yes, that is a Star Wars homage that you are seeing below. The story revolves around SPC Sergio Estavia's experience on Christmas during the Iraqi general election. A seeminlgy quiet evening for his convoy gives way to a fiery act of revenge.

Jay did the layouts, David did the final art, and I (me) did the typos. The book is due for an April release and will be available in comic shops around the D.C., Maryland, Virginia.

You can find out more here: http://dcconspiracy.com/

March 26: Morrie Turner documentary fundraiser

Posting for Mike Rhode:


Tue Mar 17, 2009
http://news.yahoo.com/s/usnw/20090317/pl_usnw/new_documentary_to_explore_america_s_first_multi_cultural_comic_strip;_ylc=X3oDMTB0ZWs2cDJqBF9TAzIxNTExMDUEZW1haWxJZAMxMjM3Mzc4MTQy
To: NATIONAL EDITORS

Contact: Jennifer White of NPJ Advertising & Public Relations, +1-202-347-6464, for Heaven Sent Productions

"Wee Pals" documentary coming to D.C. as the first stop on the film's tour across the country

WASHINGTON, March 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Actress, producer, director, comedian, and author of Master the Art of Cold Reading Angel Harper and Heaven Sent Productions will be hosting An Evening with the Stars, a discussion and screening of Keeping the Faith with Morrie, the award-winning documentary short on Morrie Turner, "Wee Pals" creator and America's first nationally syndicated African American cartoonist.

On Thursday, March 26th, D.C.'s Busboys & Poets will be holding this event of fun, food, entertainment provided by Koli Tengella, a HBO comedian and performer. In addition, there will be a discussion with Angel Harper in the Langston Hughes room at Busboys & Poets, located at 2021 14th St NW. This is the first stop on a four city tour that will showcase Harper's work and will continue on to Baltimore and Philadelphia before culminating in New York City.

Keeping The Faith With Morrie, directed by Angel Harper and produced by Heaven Sent Productions, is a documentary which chronicles the incredible life journey of African American cartoonist Morrie Turner. Turner is the first American cartoonist to have a nationally syndicated multiethnic comic strip. Morrie, following his dream, overcame emotional hurdles, and societal road blocks to become an American pop culture icon and history maker. Turner's work "strove to create an animated world of acceptance and racial tolerance through the medium of comics," says Harper regarding the film's historical and cultural impact, and is worthy of recognition.

Angel Harper, in addition to founding Heaven Sent Productions, is an actress who has appeared in such notable films as Clara's Heart (with actress Whoopi Goldberg) and Kiss the Girls (alongside actor Morgan Freeman). She is an award-winning voice-over performer and a stand-up comedian who won an "America's Funniest People" award. With "Keeping the Faith with Morrie Turner," Harper hopes to showcase Turner's influential career, humanitarianism, and determination to improve race relations.

This special screening is an effort to raise finishing funds to complete the feature length documentary film. With proper funding, Harper and the Heaven Sent team hopes to create an inspiring film detailing Morrie Turner's life and contributions, but also hopes to raise awareness of the little-known history and impact of African-American comic strips and comic strip artists on American pop culture.

Heaven Sent Productions is a non-profit production company located in Los Angeles, CA and supported by user donations and a board of trustees. Heaven Sent Productions is lead by executive producer, actress, voice-over performer, and comedian Angel Harper. One of their latest projects is award-winning documentary "Keeping the Faith with Morrie" which is currently being promoted in order to increase its running time from 10 minutes to a 60-minute documentary.

SOURCE Heaven Sent Productions

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Off to Watchmen

Back tomorrow, but I really enjoyed Super Human Resources comic book that came out today.

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Comic Art Indigene artist interview


See "Q&A: Comic Artist Jolene Nenibah Yazzie," By Megan Gambino, Smithsonian's Around the Mall blog March 16, 2009.

Upcoming Appearance: Ken Marcus at Big Planet Comics in Vienna, VA

Kevin Panetta, manager at Big Planet Comics in Vienna, VA writes in to say:
No. It’s not Superman. It’s Super Human Resources scribe Ken Marcus! He’ll be here from 4PM-7PM on March 18th signing copies of the first issue of his hilarious new take on tights and capes, Super Human Resources! See what happens when Tim takes a job as a temp at a superhero agency. So stop by, get your new comics, and support a local creator all in one fell swoop!


He'll be at Bethesda from 11-2 - Mike

Ben Classen illo in Express

Ben Classen has a 4-panel comic strip in today’s Express illustrating an article on a website where people recount rotten things that have happened to them. Classen’s work, including his comic panel Dirtfarm, usually appears weekly in the City Paper.

Cathy Hunter posting for Mike Rhode

Monday, March 16, 2009

March 27: Naruto anime screening

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Chris Wanamaker, (202) 262 2083 president@dcanimeclub.org


DC Anime Club to screen Naruto The Movie at the Japan Information and Culture Center, Embassy of Japan.



DC Anime Club in collaboration with Japan Information and Culture Center, Embassy of Japan will screen Naruto The Movie.

Friday March 27, 2009 6:30 pm as part of inaugural showing for a new film series based on both Anime (Japanese Animation) and Manga ( Japanese Comics).

Naruto The Movie is a 2004 film directed by Tensai Okamura and written by Katsuyuki Sumisawa based on the popular anime and manga series Naruto by manga artist Masashi Kishimoto.

Kakashi orders Naruto, Sasuke, and Sakura to watch a movie before their next mission.

Naruto is a big fan of the lead actress. After the movie, they see the heroine in person and being chased. They help her and Naruto asks for an autograph but she wouldn't give him one. When the three returns, Kakashi tells them about their mission: to escort the actress to the Snow Country to film a new movie.

This event is free and open to the public. Reservations are required.

RSVP to jiccrsvpspring08@embjapan.org.

Seating is limited and granted on a first come, first served basis.

For more information please visit the Japanese Information and Culture Center website at http://www.us.embjapan.go.jp/jicc/ or visit the DC Anime Club website at http://dcanimeclub.org.

Mark Wheatley interview with Mr. Media

Bob Andelman interviews a lot of pop culture figures and hits comic people up too. Here's one with Maryland cartoonist Mark Wheatley that I just ran across. The description following is Bob's and a here's a direct link to listen, but click through so he can count you on his stats. Besides there's a lot of other cartoonist interviews there too - I just linked to one relevant to this site.

Original Air Date: 1/9/2009 1:00 PM
Mark Wheatley and Robert Tinnell, LONE JUSTICE, EZ STREET comics creators: Mr. Media Interview

Robert Tinnell has spent the last half decade racking up credits as a graphic novelist with The Black Forest, The Wicked West, and Sight Unseen splashing blood across the comic book pages. Now, Mark Wheatley and Robert Tinnell, the creative team behind last year's Harvey-nominated webcomic/graphic novel EZ Street, follow up with Lone Justice: Crash. LJ:C, like EZ Street, will run for free right on ComicMix beginning January 12, but that's not where the similarities end.

In EZ Street, central characters Scott and Danny Fletcher set to work on a comic book project featuring their character, Lone Justice. Lone Justice: Crash is in fact Wheatley and Tinnell's take on what that book would be. Featuring the art of Wheatley (Frankenstein Mobster, Mars) and co-scripted by Tinnell (Feast of the Seven Fishes), Lone Justice: Crash takes place during the Depression, but given this era's economic troubles will most certainly resonate with the modern reader.

Lone Justice: Crash follows the exploits of the titular character, who was first introduced as the creation of Scott and Danny Fletcher, themselves characters in Tinnell and Wheatley's EZ Street. Occupied for years successfully battling crime as Lone Justice, millionaire Octavius Brown has let his own finances slip to the point of ruin. Now destitute, unable to even effectively re-arm his weaponry, Brown must live amongst the masses of homeless in the city. It is there that he learns the true face of evil, and from nothing is reborn as a true defender of the innocent. Combining the thrills of two-fisted pulp action with a storyline that parallels much of our nation's current socio-economic struggles, Lone Justice: Crash represents a sincere effort to deliver what comics can do at their best: an entertaining message.

Thompson nominated for Reuben for 2nd year

Alan Gardener's reporting the nominations for the National Cartoonist Society's Rueben Awards, and Cul de Sac is up for newspaper comic strip again this year. I don't know where Lars Leetaru lives, but he's been doing work for the Washington Post lately since the NY Times dropped him from their Metropolitan Diary column and some of that must have influenced his newspaper illustration nomination. I like his work quite a bit. Bob Staake is up for magazine illustration - presumably for his New Yorker work, but he's still appearing in the Post every Saturday.

Sunday, March 15, 2009

March 28: National Cherry Blossom Anime Marathon

Freer and Sackler Galleries Celebrate the National Cherry Blossom Festival with Monster Tales, Anime Films and ImaginAsia Workshops March 28-April 12

The Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery will offer a variety of programs, exhibitions and tours to celebrate the 2009 National Cherry Blossom Festival, March 28 through April 12, in Washington, D.C.

Coinciding with the festival, the Sackler Gallery presents “The Tale of Shuten Dōji,” March 21 through Sept. 20. Colorful illustrations on scrolls, screens, fans and books from Japan’s Edo period (1615-1868) tell the heroic tale of the conquest of the terrifying red monster Shuten Dōji by the hero Minamoto Yorimitsu (948–1021), known as Raikō. Docent-led tours will be available throughout the duration of the exhibition. Visitors can also explore the Japanese galleries in the Freer and learn how artists from the ninth through 19th centuries developed a distinctive repertoire of techniques for applying gold and silver to works of art in “Moonlight and Golden Clouds: Silver and Gold in the Arts of Japan,” on view through Nov. 8. In the adjacent galleries, 13 ceramics from China, Vietnam, Korea and Japan show how broken clay vessels were mended with lacquer resin and sprinkled with gold dust—transforming their appearance and creating a new component of appreciation in "Golden Seams: The Japanese Art of Mending Ceramics,” also on view though Nov. 8. In the Freer and Sackler’s ImaginAsia workshops, children ages 8-14 and their adult companions can experience an exhibition and create a related art project to take home. On March 28 and 29, ImaginAsia presents an “Anime Artist Workshop,” which explores how contemporary artists draw upon the traditions of Japanese masters. On April 4-19, participants can learn about the exhibition “Moonlight and Clouds” and make their own silver and gold creations.

On Saturday, March 28, the Freer Gallery hosts the seventh annual “National Cherry Blossom Anime Marathon” in cooperation with the Japan Information and Culture Center and Otakorp Inc. The daylong event, beginning at 11 a.m. in the Meyer Auditorium, features a costume show and exhibition courtesy of the DC Anime Club. Nine Japanese films are also coming to the Freer in the traveling retrospective “In the Realm of
Oshima,” showcasing the brash, rebellious, passionate and conservative films of director Nagisa Oshima. Films will be screened on Fridays and Sundays from March 6 through April 5; two tickets per person will be distributed at the Meyer Auditorium one hour before each screening. For up-to-dateinformation on show times and film titles and descriptions, visit www.asia.si.edu.
“The Tale of Shuten Dōji” has been made possible with support from the Anne van Biema Endowment Fund. “In the Realm of Oshima” was organized by James Quandt of the Cinematheque Ontario and sponsored by the Japan Foundation, the Kawakita Memorial Film Institute and Janus Films. The National Cherry Blossom Festival is an annual two-week, citywide event featuring daily cultural performances, arts and crafts, exhibits and demonstrations, sporting events, international cuisine and other special events. It will be held March 28-April 12, with the parade April 4. The 2009
festival celebrates the 97th anniversary of the gift of the cherry blossom trees to United States from Japan and the enduring friendship between the citizens of the two countries.

The Freer Gallery of Art, located at 12th Street and Independence Avenue S.W., and the adjacent Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, located at 1050 Independence Avenue S.W., are on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. every day, except Dec. 25, and admission is free. The galleries are located near the Smithsonian Metrorail station on the Blue and Orange lines. For more information, the public may call (202) 633-1000 or visit the Web site: www.asia.si.edu

---

Cherry Blossom Anime Marathon
March 28, 2009


Animal Treasure Island
11:30 AM
Based on Robert Louis Stevenson’s beloved novel Treasure Island, Hiroshi Ikeda’s delightful children’s film tells the story of a boy, Jim, and his mouse friend Gran, who set sail in search of riches, only to a band of dastardly pirates led by Captain Silver. Suitable for all ages. (1971, 78 min., English, video)

Evangelion 1.0: You Are (Not) Alone
1:30 PM
This sci-fi tale co-directed by Hideaki Anno, Masayuki and Kazuya Tsurumaki is set in a post-apocalyptic Tokyo, where the population defends itself from alien invaders with the help of human/mechanical hybrid battle robots. Its hero, Shinji, is a shy 14-year-old boy mysteriously chosen to save the planet from the aliens for good. Rated PG. (2007, 98 min., Japanese with English subtitles, video)

4:00 PM
Vexille
Visual effects whiz Sori directed this stunning example of animation as high tech high art – a fusion of advanced techniques and sophisticated thinking about mankind’s possible future. In the year 2077, Japan has isolated itself from the world. The film’s eponymous heroine and her team of US commandos are ordered to infiltrate its barricades and get to the root of the illegal biotechnology experiments being conducted by sinister mega-corporation Daiwa. Rated PG-13. (2007, 110 min., Japanese with English subtitles, video)

7:00 PM
The Girl Who Leapt Through Time
In 35mm!
As the title suggests, Mamoru Hosoda’s cheery comedy is about a teenage tomboy who discovers that she can travel through time. After discovering her power, goofy, scatterbrained Motoko goes on all manner of exciting adventures, but ultimately realizes that friendship is the greatest adventure of all. Rated PG. (2006, 98 min., Japanese with English subtitles)

Tickets
Tickets for all films (two per person per film) will be distributed beginning at 10:30 AM. Half of the tickets for each film will be held back and distributed approximately one hour before each show time.

Zadzooks on Halo videogame

Not comics for the most part, but you can view this as animation - "Zadzooks: Halo Wars review: Microsoft Game Studios latest a fans' epic," Joseph Szadkowski, Washington Times Wednesday, March 11, 2009.

"Bennett's Best for the week of March 1," By Greg Bennett, Zadzooks Blog March 09 2009 recommends a couple of Marvel titles.

"Zadzooks: Watchmen movie versus comic books," BY JOE SZADKOWSKI, Zadzooks Blog March 13 2009.

Washington Times reporters Sonny Bunch and Joseph Szadkowski compare Zack Snyder's Watchmen movie to the Watchmen comic book series by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 03-18-09

New Gaiman/Vess!

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 03-18-09
By John Judy

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #588 by Marc Guggenheim and John Romita Jr. The conclusion of the “Character Assassination” storyline with lots of fights and Goblin-critters.

AMERICAN FLAGG DEFINITIVE COLLECTION. VOL. 2 SC written and drawn by Howard Chaykin. Collecting issues 8-14 of Chaykin’s signature work, plus never before published material.

BLUEBERRY GIRL HC by Neil Gaiman and Charles Vess. The creator credits on this make it a Must-Have but if you need a taste try this: “Ladies of Light and Ladies of darkness and Ladies of never-you-mind. This is a prayer for a blueberry girl.” And it’s all drawn by Vess. Highly recommended for anyone who has or has been a daughter.

COURTNEY CRUMRIN, VOL. 4: MONSTROUS HOLIDAY SC written and drawn by Ted Naifeh. The latest supernatural adventures with Courtney and her Uncle Aloysius.

DARK AVENGERS #3 by Brian Michael Bendis and Mike Deodato. Morgan LeFay is still pretty hot and bothered about Sentry ripping her head off last issue. Did she not understand these were the DARK Avengers? Fun stuff, perhaps a bit much for the youngers.

HELLBLAZER #253 by Peter Milligan and Giuseppe Camuncoli. John Constantine must confront the demons of his past. Wow, is it Every Day of the Week again?

ULTIMATUM #3 of 5 by Jeph Loeb and David Finch. All the heroes what ain’t drownded have to go after Ultimate genocidal bug-bat Magneto. Straight up.

UNCANNY X-MEN #507 by Matt Fraction and Terry Dodson. Crazy parallel storylines of mutants fighting! Classic X-book action! And it looks swell.

WATCHMENSCH by Rich Johnston and Simon Rohrmuller. A two-fisted parody/satire that requires almost no knowledge of Yiddish to enjoy! “Hurm!” Recommended!

WOLVERINE #71 by Mark Millar and Steve McNiven. “Old Man Logan” continues as a T-Rex wearing a Venom symbiote enters the scene. A must-have for all T-Rex/Venom Symbiote aficionados!

X-FACTOR #41 by Peter David and Valentine De Landro. Sentinels! The giant purple robot rumble starts here!

www.johnjudy.net

Friday, March 13, 2009

OT: MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY COMICS FORUM 2009 poster out


Ryan Claytor, who's teaching comics there, designed a poster, which is cool. Buy his books - they're cool too. Attend the Forum - I'm sure it's cool too. Go to the MSU libary's Special Collections Division and ask to see the Mike Rhode Collection - it's not as cool, but what the heck, it'll get them wondering.

Ronald Searle, OR I didn't expect to have any news today

"The Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines" cartoons by Ronald Searle, Milwaukee Journal August 22, 1965. What does this have to do with Washington? Well, Searle is a favorite cartoonist of Nick Galifianakis and Richard Thompson.

Searle - Magnificent Men MilJour650822a

Searle - Magnificent Men MilJour650822b

Post dropping comics

Mike Cavna's breaking the story that his colleagues are dropping Pooch Cafe, Zippy, Judge Parker, Piranha Club and Little Dog Lost as of March 30th. Bah.

I really like Judge Parker and Pooch Cafe, Zippy and Piranha Club (Bo Grace is local by the way) both have their appeal. Little Dog Lost didn't catch on with me. No notice as to why except that Dilbert is moving back from the Business section, but I'll bet they're putting in another Soduku type game since the NY Times just added one.

Thursday, March 12, 2009

French comic artist glanced at in Post

A French cartoonist, Viravong has space in Centquatre – he isn’t mentioned in the Travel section article, but the accompanying illustrations showed a panel of his work. See "A Brush With The Paris Art Scene: Out-of-the-Way Sites Show Off The Avant-Garde Side of the City," By Blake Gopnik, Washington Post Staff Writer, Sunday, March 8, 2009; F01.

Gopnik describes the studio space as a "sprawling complex, covering almost half a million square feet, does date to 1873. Until just a decade ago, it housed the city's funeral works, once home to 1,400 hearse grooms, coffinmakers, shroud-sewers and everyone else involved in burying the dead. (In typically French fashion, until very recently the government even had a monopoly on death.) But now the abandoned site has been emptied out to a loft-ish shell of masonry and skylights and poured-concrete floors, which reopened in the fall as a giant container for art and creativity." He also noted, "The Centquatre has a full program of exhibitions, but it still feels less like a place to look at finished art, on the classic model of the Musee d'Orsay, than somewhere to witness art in the making."

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Liquid Revolver comic out


Matt Dembicki says "'Liquid Revolver' is officially for sale! The 68-page book features
the talents of D.C. area artists, such as Scott White, Chris Piers, Mal Jones, Dale Rawlings, Mike Short, Khalid Iszard and yours truly! What's it about? Nazis and mind control. How can you not wanna peek? It's $6, and I'll throw in free shipping. If you'd like to buy a copy, e-mail: threecrowspress(at)gmail(dot)com.

Thanks for giving me a few seconds.

Matt Dembicki
http://threecrowspress.blogspot.com

Eat Right to Work and Win corrected

I had dropped pages 2-3 by not photographing them, but I just took a snapshot and added them in - the quality isn't as good, but it's still readable.
100_7053 Eat Right 01 Eat Right to Work and Win, a 1942 book using King Features Syndicate characters. "Contributed by Swift & Companyto America's All-Out Effort through the National Nutrition Program. Office of Defense Health and Welfare Services." To read the whole booklet, click here.

South Park's special musical guests

"Will 'South Park' Get a Population Boost When the Jonas Brothers Come to Town?" By Lisa de Moraes, Washington Post Tuesday, March 10, 2009; C07.

OT: Haspiel on Simonson

My buddy Dean talks on his blog about visiting his mentor Walt Simonson - "Walter Simonson." Man_Size blog (March 9).

Boy, I loved that run on Thor, even with the frog.

March 25: Library of Congress Swann talk on Nast

Thomas Nast and French Art
The Topic of Swann Grantee’s Talk on March 25

Swann Foundation grantee Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire will present a lecture entitled, "The Artist as Translator: Thomas Nast and French Art,” Wednesday, March 25, 2009, at 12 noon, in the West Dining Room on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, DC.

In her illustrated talk, Delamaire will examine American cartoonist Thomas Nast’s appropriation of the visual language used in prints and photographs of grand manner and history paintings in his political cartoons of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. The analysis of Nast’s cartoons suggests that they functioned much like visual, cultural, and political translations of the era’s leading issues and articulated the cartoonist’s artistic identity.

Thomas Nast (1840-1902) began his career as a newspaper illustrator in the antebellum era for the growing illustrated press of the 1850s in New York. During the Civil War years, Nast developed a new style of large-scale cartoons that made extensive use of the visual vocabulary of old masters and contemporary French academic painters, particularly those whose works were reproduced in prints then being disseminated by the American branch of Goupil & Cie in New York. Nast referenced or alluded to specific French paintings as a means of capturing and engaging his viewers’ interest in major political developments of the day as seen in such cartoons as “Democracy” or “The Tammany Tiger Loose” (published respectively in Harper’s Weekly on November 11, 1865 and November 11, 1871). In so doing, Nast not only translated “facts into black and white,” as suggested by Clarence Cook (Putnam Magazine, July 1869), but also transformed history painting into a mass medium and appropriated the significance of foreign images into the American national or local political sphere.

Delamaire contends that looking closely at Nast’s cartoons demonstrates that the artist deliberately emphasized the discontinuity between the original painting and his final image in order to construct the cartoon’s underlying meaning. Nast’s translations of history paintings into cartoons can thus be seen to question the authority and priority commonly associated with the grand tradition of European history painting. Delamaire suggests that Nast’s appropriations reveal a shift from his role as a newspaper illustrator to that of a translator of fine art’s visual language mediating the political significance of foreign works of art widely
disseminated in print form to his American audience.

Delamaire is a Ph.D. candidate in Art History at Columbia University. Her dissertation project entitled, “Art in Translation: Franco-American exchanges in the Civil War and Reconstruction Era,” has been awarded a Terra Foundation Pre-doctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution and a Swann Foundation grant. Her research interests focus on transnational exchanges in relation to the development of reproductive technology in nineteenth century visual culture, the international art market and the emerging apparatus of international exhibitions. She completed a Master’s Degree in Egyptian Archaeology. She has published several essays on the American perception of ancient Egypt, the 1867 Paris Exposition Universelle, and the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial International Exhibition.

This presentation is part of the Swann Foundation’s continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The Swann Foundation’s advisory board is composed of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members. The foundation strives to award one fellowship annually (with a stipend of up to $15,000) to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. Applications for the academic year 2009-2010 are due Feb. 15, 2010. More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swannhome or by emailing swann@loc.gov.

Express Poll on comics movies generates little interest

"Do you think graphic novels are good source materials for making movies?" was the question asked. As published in this morning's paper it was split 50-50, but when you go to the site only 12 people voted.

Horsey interview concludes on Comic Riffs

The Interview (Pt. 2): David Horsey of the (RIP?) 'Seattle Post-Intelligencer' has some really interesting viewpoints in it. Like "I decided I needed to get to know the president of Hearst Newspapers. It helps. Two Pulitzers also helps. I recommend that to anyone."

Monday, March 09, 2009

Lone Wolf and Cub at Satisfactory Comics


Journalista
points out Michael Wenthe's reviews of all 28 volumes of Lone Wolf and Cub. Michael's a local prof at American University and I apologize for not linking to his blog more. Satisfactory Comics, the experimental minicomic he does with Isaac Cates is a lot of fun and you can buy them on the site.

Comic Art Indigene reviewed at Comicsgirl blog

I'm guessing Comicsgirl is local since she popped into Comic Art Indigene on the first day it was open and wrote up her impressions. She also linked to Marcus Amerman, a bead artist who had two (both commissioned, according to the curator) pieces in the show - this George Perez's Wonder Woman bracelet and a Jae Lee's Batman belt buckle.

I'll be writing a full review of this show sometime soon...

Amazon advertises my own book to me

This got emailed to me over the weekend:





Yes, my own book, Harvey Pekar: Conversations, was one of the featured Pekar titles. I immediately considered ordering another five copies, it was so convincing.

Flora in old New York Times

James Flora is largely forgotten these days, except for Fantagraphics' fine book about him. Here's a couple of drawings from the NY Times Magazine on April 11, 1965 - the day I was born - that I found on the back of a clipped article.


My, isn't it funny how the article is still topical today?

Editorial cartoonist Horsey interviewed at Comic Riffs

Michael Cavna's got part one up today - "David Horsey: How a Cartoonist Survives If Ink Newspaper Dies," Washington Post's Comic Riffs March 9, 2009.

Art Daily features Comic Art Indigene

See "Comic Art Exhibition Opens at the National Museum of the American Indian," Art Daily March 8 2009.

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 03-11-09

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 03-11-09
By John Judy

30 DAYS OF NIGHT: 30 DAYS TIL DEATH #4 written and drawn by David Lapham. So it looks like vampires and self-control don’t always go hand in hand….

ACTION COMICS #875 by Greg Rucka and Eddy Barrows. Traditionally Superman comics without Superman have not been very good. But this is written by Greg Rucka so it will be as good as it can possibly be.

ALAN MOORE’S LIGHT OF THY COUNTENANCE GN by Moore and Felipe Massafera. A new tale from the creator of WATCHMEN about television, ghosts and old gods. Contains no giant blue phalluses that we know of.

BATMAN BATTLE FOR THE COWL #1 of 3 written and drawn by Tony Daniel. Lotsa people fighting to wear Bruce Wayne’s old undergarments. I think it should be Bucky!

CAPTAIN BRITAIN AND MI 13 #11 by Paul Cornell and Leonard Kirk. It takes a certain brass to write stories in which Dracula trades catty remarks with Doctor Doom on his secret vampire moonbase before going off to fight limey superheroes. It’s something you don’t see everyday and thus evokes a sense of “Gotta Look.” Make of this what you will.

EX MACHINA SPECIAL #4 by Brian K. Vaughan and John Paul Leon. More weirdness from Mayor Hundred’s superhero past comes creeping into the present day. A political thriller with jetpacks. Recommended.

GHOST RIDER #33 by Jason Aaron and Tony Moore. After everything blowed up real good last issue it is time to reassess. Do Ghost Riding and Vengeance Spiriting really have a future in today’s economy? And, based on previous Ghost Riders’ experiences, is it really something you’d want to pursue in the best of times? Maybe community college ain’t so bad….

IMMORTAL IRON FIST #23 Duane Swierczynski and Travel Foreman. Our heroes are getting their asses kicked in the Eighth City of Hell. And that, ladies and gentlemen is how you tell a Great Kung-Fu Story! Recommended.

LOSERS BY JACK KIRBY HC written and drawn by “The King.” Collecting OUR FIGHTING FORCES #151-162 and featuring the adventures of Johnny Cloud, Captain Storm, Gunner and Sarge. Stories influenced by Kirby’s own service in WWII. Featuring a foreword by Neil Gaiman.

NORTHLANDERS #15 by Brian Wood and Ryan Kelly. The penultimate issue in which we learn of Magnus’s past and what has made him so relentless in his vendetta against the Viking invaders. Great stuff. Recommended.

PERRY BIBLE FELLOWSHIP ALMANACK HC written and drawn by Nicholas Gurewitch. The final volume collecting the comic strips that claim such diverse fans as Jim Woodring, Scott McCloud, Tony Millionaire and the woman who wrote “Juno.”

PUNISHER: FRANK CASTLE MAX #68 by Duane Swierczynski and Michel Lacombe. Frank’s got three hours left to live and most of Philadelphia is still breathing. This will not do!

SCALPED #26 by Jason Aaron and Davide Furno. A stand-alone issue spotlighting Diesel, the rogue FBI, wanna-be Indian and his adventures behind bars. Among the best comics being published today. Highly recommended.

SPECIAL FORCES #4 of 6 written and drawn by Kyle Baker. Okay, so this title comes out about as often as Boo Radley. It’s still Kyle Baker so it’s gorgeous, clever and edgy as all get out. If the Iraq War and its accompanying military recruitment policies still have you mad you need to be reading this book. Highly recommended.

THE STAND: AMERICAN NIGHTMARES #1 of 5 by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and Mike Perkins. The second arc of this amazingly high-quality graphic adaptation begins here. The super-flu has destroyed the world and now the survivors have to cowboy up and keep living. Turns out there’s a guy named Randall Flagg in town and they’re gonna have to choose a side. Recommended.

THE STAND: CAPTAIN TRIPS PREMIERE HC by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and Mike Perkins. As noted above, Aguirre-Sacasa and Perkins have brought Stephen King’s epic to vivid life. This collects the first five issues to whet your appetite for what’s yet to come.

SUPER HUMAN RESOURCES #1 of 4 by Ken Marcus and Justin Bleep. A humorous look at a world-class super-team through the eyes of a temp worker. Hopefully no one tries to set the building on fire…

TOP 10 SEASON TWO #4 of 4 by Xander Cannon and Gene Ha. A jail-break in Neopolis, the city of science heroes. Now that’s how you wrap up a mini-series! Recommended.

WALKING DEAD #59 Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard. After the past couple of issues it’s kind of a relief to see some old-fashioned “drive over the zombies with a big car” action. Not for kids or otherwise squeamish folk.

X-MEN NOIR #4 of 4 by Fred Van Lente and Denis Calero. Wrapping up my favorite X-MEN mini-series in years: The X-Men re-imagined as hard-boiled pulp fiction characters from the thirties. Crackling dialogue with danger and double-crosses on every page. Highly recommended!

www.johnjudy.net

Staake and Thompson in New Yorker

Bob Staake, who regularly appears in the Post on Saturday, did the March 9th cover for the New Yorker. Our Man Thompson has a small caricature of a fugitive American millionaire who may be ruining sports in England. The issue also has Anthony Lane's negative review of Watchmen.

Sunday, March 08, 2009

Book of Esther comic exhibit in Baltimore

The exhibit opened today. See "New-age depiction of Esther's age-old story: Exhibit at Jewish Museum focuses on graphic novel's retelling," By Edward Gunts, Baltimore Sun March 8, 2009 for JT Waldman's graphic novel story.

Here's the basic information - "Drawing on Tradition: The Book of Esther," runs through July 26 at the Jewish Museum of Maryland, 15 Lloyd St. Admission is $8 for adults, $5 for students and free for members. Call 410-732-6400 or go to jewishmuseummd.org.

Dave Astor continues his humor column

His third is up today - and it's funny, but pointed just like his two previous ones.

Zadzooks, superheroes and Watchmen at Washington Times

On superheroes is "EDGE: Saving the world ain't what it used to be," Peter Suderman, Washington Times Friday, March 6, 2009.

Zadzooks is still on toys - "Zadzooks: More from toy fair; Legions of action figures on parade," Joseph Szadkowski, Washington Times Thursday, March 5, 2009.

But his blog has a piece by someone who doesn't know anything about Watchmen or comics - "Remembering Watchmen," By Heidi Haynes, Washington Times Zadzooks Blog March 04 2009.

And finally, here's the paper's review - "MOVIES: 'Watchmen' leap into action," Sonny Bunch, Washington Times Thursday, March 5, 2009.

Greg Houston covers Washington City Paper














I like Greg Houston's illustrations for the City Paper quite a bit. There's only one online, but the current issue has 4 or so in it.

Saturday, March 07, 2009

Post on the Unbearable Whiteness of Superbeings

See "What Color Is Your Superhero?" By Adam Serwer, Washington Post Sunday, March 8, 2009; B05. I'm afraid I'm not convinced, although if the demographics are changing I'm sure it's from movies about superheroes and not comic books.

Kronenberg interview on Batcave Companion

Here's another interview with the former DC-ite, and now telecommuter, Michael Kronenberg on his new book:

Sheriff, Amanda. 2009.
Inside The Batcave Companion.
Scoop (March 6): http://scoop.diamondgalleries.com/public/default.asp?t=1&m=1&c=34&s=265&ai=80649

Another Wimpy Kid interview

See "Talking to `Wimpy Kid' author Jeff Kinney" -Bo Book Club, TimeforKids.com, Buffalo News March 4 2009.

Sara and Mike go to Charlottesville

Sara Duke and I went to Charlottesville yesterday to see an exhibit, but we also stopped at a bunch of antique stores to exercise our comics-senses. So here's some of what I found:

100_7051 Opus 'n Bill On the Road Again screen saver 1

100_7052 Opus 'n Bill On the Road Again screen saver 2
Opus 'n Bill On the Road Again screen saver box covers. Unfortunately, I have no idea how one could view the animated segments now.


100_7053 Eat Right 01 Eat Right to Work and Win, a 1942 book using King Features Syndicate characters. "Contributed by Swift & Companyto America's All-Out Effort through the National Nutrition Program. Office of Defense Health and Welfare Services." To read the whole booklet, click here.

100_7049 Foxy Grandpa doorstop Foxy Grandpa doorstop by Carl 'Bunny' Schultze. This is the second Foxy Grandpa thing I've found around Charlottesville - the first was a bank of his head. Sara and I both think this was repainted, but that doesn't much matter to me.

100_7050 Ferd'nand 1957 bookWordless comic strip Ferd'nand 1957 collection.

100_7061 Sagendorf Davy Crockett gameBud Sagendorf's Davy Crockett game, done around the time he was doing Popeye. I love the fact that someone saved this out of the Sunday comics and mounted it. I'll probably make a color copy and play it with my daughter. If there's any interest, I can do a hi-res scan for you readers.

100_7047
100_7046
100_7045
100_7043
100_7042
100_7041
100_7040
100_7044
Seven plates from Merry Masterpieces Fine Porcelain plates, Dayton Hudson, 1999. Anybody know anything more about these? Is it a New Yorker artist? They look vaguely like Danny Shanahan to me.

I bought a few more books and some Puck lithographs too.

Acquisitions considered, but not made: Raymond Briggs' Snowman place setting, 4 pieces by Royal Doulton - $40; Wood bas relief carving of Charles Dana Gibson cartoon - ? (some non-buyer regret over not at least checking the price); Raymond Briggs' Snowman porcelain box by Royal Doulton - $18; James Thurber house 50th anniversary commemorative plate - $40;