Friday, February 29, 2008

Mark Tatulli of Lio chat on WashPost.com

See "Meet the Comics Pages: Mark Tatulli, Cartoonist -- Lio", Friday, February 29, 2008; 1:00 PM. Note our man Thompson get schooled by Tobin towards the end for daring to ask about Beetle Bailey.

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 03-05-08

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 03-05-08
By John Judy

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #552 by Bob Gale and Phil Jimenez. The writer of “Back to the Future” takes on Spidey. “Great Scott!” No wait, that’s X-Men….

BOYS #16 by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson. Involving an undead “hero” and a gerbil. Ennis pushes the envelope and then sticks it screaming into the shredder. Not for kids.

BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER #12 by Drew Goddard and Georges Jeanty. A new story-arc “Wolves at the Gate” from the writer of “Alias”, “Lost”, and “Cloverfield.” Set in Tokyo.

CABLE #1 by Duane Swierczynski and Ariel Olivetti. Cable's in 2043 New Jersey which is even worse than 2008 New Jersey if such a thing is possible. And he's got the mutant killer Jesus baby from “Messiah Complex.” At least there's violence.

CLANDESTINE #2 of 5 written and drawn by Alan Davis. An immortal family dramedy reminiscent of a good "Buffy" but with a lot of back-story. And it's got Davis art so of course it looks great.

FABLES: 1001 NIGHTS OF SNOWFALL SC by Bill Willingham and Every Artist You Love, including Vess, Bolland, Kaluta, and many more! Something for everyone! Recommended!

GREEN LANTERN #28 by Geoff Johns and Mike McKone. More fun with the Alpha Lanterns, the Lost Lanterns, and the Pistachio Rocky-Road Lanterns!

JUSTICE LEAGUE: NEW FRONTIER SPECIAL written and drawn by Darwyn Cooke. Lotsa never before seen goodies celebrating the release of the popular DVD.

KIRBY: KING OF COMICS HC by Mark Evanier. Years in the making, this is Evanier’s tribute to his former boss and long-time friend, Jack Kirby, the guy who co-created the foundations of the Marvel Universe and a lot more. Already going back to press, this book is a must for all subjects of The King. Highly Recommended.

LOGAN #1 of 3 by Brian K. Vaughan and Eduardo Risso. Given the creative team this book shall surely take its place in the small but elite club of “Wolverine Comics That Don’t Suck.”

NORTHLANDERS #4 by Brian Wood and Davide Gianfelice. Sven the Uber-Viking faces repercussions from his latest naughtiness. Great stuff from the author of DMZ.

OMEGA THE UNKNOWN #6 of 10 by Jonathan Lethem and Faryl Dalrymple. This issue has a nice but spare memorial page to the late Steve Gerber, creator of Omega the Unknown and Howard the Duck, who passed away recently from a smoking-related illness. Beyond that you're either into this series already or you're not.

SCALPED #15 by Jason Aaron and R.M. Guera. Introducing Mr. Brass and his little black bag of pain. Okay, all of you have to start reading this now. Except for the kids. Highly recommended.

STREETS OF GLORY #4 of 6 by Garth Ennis and Mike Wolfer. The battle rages on against renegade Indians, blown shipping deadlines, and Avatar’s crummy website.

TERRY MOORE’S ECHO #1 written and drawn by Terry Moore. The creator of STRANGERS IN PARADISE wonders what it would be like to be the host of a symbiotic nuclear weapon and a dead woman who lives in your heart. Well, who hasn’t?!

THE TWELVE #3 of 12 J. Michael Straczynski and Chris Weston. A really strong issue focusing on how the twelve time-tossed heroes of the 40s are adjusting to the 21st century. Gorgeous art by Weston. Thus far the strongest of the three "golden-age revival" books on the stands this month. Highly recommended.

UNCANNY X-MEN #496 by Ed Brubaker and Mike Choi. Global Mutant Action in San Francisco and Russia! A good issue but one you shouldn't read until the current ASTONISHING X-MEN story wraps up. Major Spoiler Alert! Otherwise recommended.

YOUNG LIARS #1 written and drawn by David Lapham. The creator of STRAY BULLETS begins his first full-color monthly book featuring the adventures of a brain-damaged rich girl, a pathological liar, and their entourage of losers. Not for the young or faint of heart. Recommended.

www.johnjudy.net

Thursday, February 28, 2008

Mr. Big wins Day Prize

Matt Dembicki writes in to say, "-Mr. Big was named the 2007 Day Prize winner (Dave Sim called me to tell me). Carol and I will be exhibiting at the Small Press and Alternative Comics Expo in Columbus, Ohio, this weekend, where we'll receive the award. Should be an all-around fun weekend!"

Congratulations Matt and Carol! Mr. Big is an all-ages story of a turtle for those who haven't seen it yet.

For more information, see http://www.backporchcomics.com/day_prize_announcement.htm

March 5: Berg lecture on Columbia at LoC

Martha Kennedy reminds us:

For those of you in the Washington, D.C. area who might be interested, we invite you to Swann Fellow Dr. Ellen Berg’s public talk titled "Where Have You Gone, Miss Columbia? American Identity and Uncle Sam’s Forgotten Partner,” at noon on Wednesday, March 5, 2008, in Dining Room A, 6th floor Madison Building, Library of Congress at 101 Independence S.E., Washington, DC. In her lecture, she will draw on the Library’s collections of cartoon prints, posters, drawings, and related items which contain many portrayals of Miss Columbia in order to examine how changing depictions of Columbia reflect parallel changes in ideas about American identity and feminine nationalism.
We hope very much that some of you can join us!

March 18: CARTOONS BY MODERNIST PAINTER AD REINHARDT

CARTOONS BY MODERNIST PAINTER AD REINHARDT DISCUSSED AT LIBRARY OF CONGRESS ON MARCH 18

During World War II, American abstract expressionist painter Ad Reinhardt made a series of little-known but striking cartoon collages of Adolf Hitler. Reinhardt’s overlooked cartoon work will be discussed by Swann Foundation Fellow Prudence Peiffer in a lecture at the Library of Congress on March 18.

Peiffer’s presentation, “How to Look at Ad Reinhardt’s World War II Cartoons in America,” will begin at noon on Tuesday, March 18, in Dining Room A on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, D.C. The event is free and open to the public; no reservations are required.

The illustrated talk is based on research conducted by Peiffer at the Library of Congress during her fellowship, which was awarded last year by the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon. The lecture is sponsored by the foundation, which is managed by the Library, and the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division.

The cartoon collages by Reinhardt (1913-1967) were published during World War II in The New Masses journal and PM newspaper. By 1946, he had honed his collage technique in his “How to Look at Modern Art” cartoons.

In her talk, Peiffer will explore how Reinhardt mined the history of political cartoons to create his own unique strategy of radical aesthetics, and she will argue for a connection between his best-known abstract paintings from the 1950s and 1960s and his earlier cartoon work. She will draw upon examples of Reinhardt’s published cartoon creations and drawings by such cartoonists as Miguel Covarrubias (1904-1957), whose work influenced the younger artist.

In addition to being a Swann fellow at the Library of Congress, Peiffer is a pre-doctoral fellow at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C. She is a doctoral candidate in 20th-century art history at Harvard University and is writing her dissertation titled “Routine Extremism: Ad Reinhardt and Modern Art.” Peiffer completed a master’s degree in the history of art and architecture at Harvard and a bachelor’s in art history at Yale University. Her particular interest is in the intersections between abstraction and figuration in 20th-century art.

Peiffer’s presentation is part of the Swann Foundation’s continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The foundation’s advisory board is made up of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members.

The Swann Foundation customarily awards one fellowship annually (with a stipend of $15,000) to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/ or by e-mailing swann@loc.gov.

# # #

PR08-42

2/28/08

ISSN: 0731-3527

Wednesday, February 27, 2008

Monday, February 25, 2008

March 5: Adrian Tomine at Polilitics and Prose

Just got an email from Drawn and Quarterly with his Shortcomings book tour schedule and it's WASHINGTON DC Wednesday, March 5th, 2008 7:00 PM Politics & Prose. See www.politics-prose.com

Not your typical Dagwood








The image on the left is by Eric Shansby, who illustrates Gene Weingarten's column in the Washington Post Magazine. This is from the February 24th issue in which someone pitches the idea of a no-work holiday on leap day. I always enjoy seeing comics characters drawn by a different artist.

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 02-27-08

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 02-27-08
By John Judy

ALL-STAR BATMAN AND ROBIN #9 by Frank Miller and Jim Lee. Brace yourselves….

BATMAN #674 by Grant Morrison and Tony Daniel. Torture! Isolation! Bat-Mite! Three great tastes that go great together!

BLACK PANTHER ANNUAL #1 by Reginald Hudlin, Larry Stroman, and Ken Lashley. A peek into the future with magic frogs. Good stuff.

CAPTAIN AMERICA #35 by Ed Brubaker and Butch Guice. In which we learn not to trust a Nazi analyst with a beard longer than all of Z.Z. Top put together.

CRIME BIBLE: THE FIVE LESSONS OF BLOOOD #5 of 5 by Greg Rucka, Manuuel Garcia, and Jimmy Palmiotti. Final issue with an awesome cover by John Van Fleet.

CRIMINAL 2 #1 by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips. Just the best damn comic on the stands. Honest. Not for kids. Lots of extras and a great jumping-on point for all. Highly Recommended.

DAN DARE #4 by Garth Ennis and Gary Erskine. It’s space-opera, Ennis-style!

DAREDEVIL #105 by Ed Brubaker and Michael Lark. The big showdown with Mister Fear a.ka. “Larry.” It’s a great pay-off and a classic Brubaker twist of the knife. Recommended.

GRAVEL #1 by Warren Ellis, Mike Wolfer, and Raulo Caceres. Ellis’s “Combat Magician” is back! Brutal hi-jinks ensue! NOT for kids.

HELLBLAZER #241 by Andy Diggle and Leonardo Manco. An evil war-mage is after Constantine and none of his friends want to help. In other words, it’s Wednesday.

JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA #13 by Geoff Johns, Alex Ross, and Dale Eaglesham. Featuring a classic floating-heads cover by Alex Ross! With a story inside!

KICK ASS #1 by Mark Millar and John Romita Jr. It would appear to contain fisticuffs.

MARVEL MASTERWORKS: ATLAS ERA HEROES, VOL. 2 HC by John Romita Sr., Bill Everett, and Other Underpaid Folks. If you like seeing Captain America, the Human Torch, and the Sub-Mariner fighting commies, this is the book for you!

MARVEL ZOMBIES 2 #5 of 5 by Robert Kirkman and Sean Phillips. Some will live! Some will die! Some will die again! Or will they….?

PROJECT SUPERPOWERS #1 of 6 by Alex Ross, Jim Krueger, and Carlos Paul. The “golden-age heroes in the modern world” story NOT being written by Straczynski! Thank-you, expired copyrights!

RASL #1 written and drawn by Jeff Smith. In Smith’s own words: “”It’s pronounced ‘Razzle.’ It’s Blade Runner meets Jason Bourne. He’s an art thief who jumps dimensions. It’s a serialized graphic novel that’ll take about two years to finish.” In other words, this one’s the Event of the Week!

SHE-HULK #26 by Peter David and Shawn Moll. Bounty-huntin’, badoon smackin’, raise the dead action from the PAD-guy!

SHOWCASE PRESENTS SUPERMAN FAMILY VOL. 2 SC by Otto Binder, Curt Swan, Wayne Boring, and Others! Classic tales of Jimmy Olsen and Lois Lane! Good for the whole family!

SPIDER-MAN: WITH GREAT POWER #2 of 5 by David Lapham and Tony Harris. Tales from after the bite but before Uncle Ben got killed by Generic Thug or Sandman or whoever.

THOR #6 by J. Michael Straczynski and Olivier Copiel. Tales of Asgard by way of Oklahoma. Also a tough decision is reached.

WORLD WAR HULK AFTERSMASH: DAMAGE CONTROL #2 of 3 by Dwayne McDuffie and Salva Espin. If Halliburton existed in the Marvel Universe (and wasn’t completely evil) it would be Damage Control.

YOUNG AVENGERS PRESENTS: HULKLING #2 of 6 by Brian Reed and Harvey Tolibao. A father-son reunion for Hulkling and Captain Mar-Vell. Nice stuff.

Plus PREVIEWS from Diamond and Marvel Comics.

www.johnjudy.net

Sunday, February 24, 2008

Watch Your Head tips towards Big Planet Comics


Pointed out by Robert and Brenda, last Monday's strip seems to be placed at Big Planet Comics, which would be one of Corey Thomas' local comics stores. There used to be an Another World/Universe chain in the area too, until they imploded.

Saturday, February 23, 2008

Friday, February 22, 2008

Feb 23: Ron Marz signing

Randy T sends in:

Marz Attacks (or at least Signs Witchblade)

Ron Marz, the acclaimed writer of Samurai: Heaven and Earth, is making to signing stops on his mini-tour of the Baltimore, Maryland - Washington, DC area for his work on Top Cow Productions' Witchblade.

After appear on Baltimore's Fox 45 on Friday morning, Marz will sign copies of the new specially priced Witchblade - Volume 1 on Saturday, February 23, 2008 from 11 AM to 2 PM at Cards, Comics & Collectibles in Reisterstown, Maryland, and from 4 PM to 7 PM at Phoenix Comics and Toys' Lansdowne location. The new trade retails for $4.99.

Marz first received widespread attention for his work on Silver Surfer and Green Lantern in the 1990s. Since then he has written Star Wars, taken part in the Marvel vs DC event, and many other top comic properties.

“The Baltimore Comic-Con is one of my favorite shows of the year, so I jumped at the chance to meet more of the fans from the Baltimore/DC area," he said. "Plus I don’t have to work to hard to convince fans to pick up a five dollar trade!”

For more information, contact the respective stores:

Cards, Comics, and Collectibles
100 Chartley Drive
Reisterstown, MD 21136
(410) 526-7410

Phoenix Comics and Toys
Lansdowne Shopping Center
19340 Promenade Drive
Lansdowne, VA 20176
(703) 437-9530

New Frontier DTV animation reviewed in Post

See "'New Frontier' Does These Heroes Justice," by David Betancourt, Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, February 22, 2008; Page WE35.

Thursday, February 21, 2008

Herblock prize winner John Sherffius interview

See "John Sherffius Discusses the Herblock Prize and the Cartoons That Helped Him Win it," By Dave Astor, Editor and Publisher Online February 21, 2008. The Foundation's announcement can be seen here.

There's a new Herblock exhibit opening at the National Portrait Gallery in May too.

Robin Givhan on superhero-inspired fashions

The Post's fashion correspondent Robin Givhan blogs about superhero-inspired fashions today at "Super Heroes and Super Surprises." The International Herald Tribune has a lot more pictures though.

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Mexican editorial cartoonist on one of those Post blogs you've never heard of

Amar C. Bakshi on February 19th interviewed Francisco "Paco" Calderon for "Mexico Wages Cartoon Wars Over U.S." There's video on the site as well.

Comics with stories beyond the 4th wall in today's Post

Dilbert refers back to a worker who was fired for posting a Dilbert strip on a bulletin board at work. Dave Astor's got more details than I can bother with.

Baldo's creators tip a hat to Gus Arriola, the cartoonist for Gordo who died earlier this month. R.C. Harvey's book on Arriola and Gordo is still in print and is probably the easiest to find if you want to know more.

Online article on animation, stereotypes and censorship

See "'Toon 'Types: Animated Stereotypes," by Express contributor Paul Stelter, February 20, 2008.

Tuesday, February 19, 2008

3 bits quickly

According to Dave Astor at E&P Online, Mark Tatulli of Lio will be on the Washington Post chat at 1 pm on Friday, February 29th.

Italians have discovered Cul de Sac even though it doesn't appear to be available in Italian. BTW, Italians have a very rich comics tradition, but almost none of it has been reprinted in the US - just Diabolik and a Tex Willer book by Joe Kubert, I think. Oh, and a lot of Disney stories.

Today's Post chat was on "TV Week: The Return of George of the Jungle: Back In the Swing" with Tiffany Ward, Executive Producer (and Jay Ward's daughter), Tuesday, February 19, 2008.

Monday, February 18, 2008

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 02-20-08

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 02-20-08
By John Judy

ANGEL: AFTER THE FALL #4 by Joss Whedon, Brian Lynch, and Franco Urru. Believe it or not, there is yet another shock ending to come. T’would be so awesome to see on TV…

BOYS, VOL. 2: GET SOME SC by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson. Collecting issues #7-14 featuring the Tek-Knight and the Boys’ trip to Russia. NOT for kids, no way-no how, but still recommended.

BRAVE AND BOLD #10 by Mark Waid and George Perez. Untold tales from the Book of Destiny! Supes! Titans! Silver-Age fun galore! Recommended!

EX MACHINA #34 by Brian K. Vaughan and Tony Harris. Sure, Y THE LAST MAN is over, but we can still get our B.K. Vaughan fix here! This issue we see how an urban vigilante would be received by a real big city police department.

HULK #2 by Jeph Loeb and Ed McGuinness. Still no clue who the Red Hulk is but we do learn why Rick Jones can’t keep his shirt together.

IMMORTAL IRON FIST: ORSON RANDALL AND THE GREEN MIST OF DEATH 1-SHOT by Matt Fraction and Various Artists. Lots of great art and some very important context for what’s happening over in the regular title. Not absolutely essential to understanding the regular series but a huge help in getting past the more puzzling details.

JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #18 by Dwayne McDuffie and Ed Benes. JLA vs. Suicide Squad! So when you’re fighting a team called “Suicide Squad” is it appropriate to stand back and say “Okay, go ahead.”?

MAAKIES WITH WRINKLED KNEES HC by Tony Millionaire. Collecting two years worth of the cartoon adventures of Drinky Crow and Uncle Gabby, the hapless ape. Look, ya either get it or ya don’t.

MIGHTY AVENGERS #9 by Brian Michael Bendis and Mark Bagley. What happens when you invade a country that actually has WMDs? Doctor Doom elaborates on this subject.

MARVEL MASTERWORKS: ANT-MAN/GIANT-MAN VOL. 2 HC by Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, Carl Burgos, Don Heck, Steve Ditko, and Others. Collecting TALES TO ASTONISH #53-69 from the days before Hank Pym was a spouse-beating, depressive with multiple personality disorder. A must-have for all Human Top completists!

RUNAWAYS #29 by Joss Whedon and Michael Ryan. My admiration of the creative team notwithstanding this book was last seen in October of 2007 so it’s kind of hard to recall who’s doing what to whom. Fun stuff if you like “Back to the Future Meets Gangs of New York Meets X-Men.” And I kinda do…. Still, I’d like my own time machine so I could travel four months into the future to see how this all wraps up.

SPIRIT #14 by Sergio Aragones, Mark Evanier, and Mike Ploog. A new creative team on Eisner’s most famous creation! If anyone can follow Darwyn Cooke it’s these guys! Recommended.

ULTIMATE HUMAN #2 of 4 by Warren Ellis and Cary Nord. Ultimate Hulk fights Ultimate Iron Man. Yeah, that’s about it.

ULTIMATES 3 #3 of 5 by Jeph Loeb and Joe Madureira. The mystery of who killed Ultimate Scarlet Witch is overshadowed by the assertion that she and her brother were doing something that is illegal in most states. (Except maybe the Scarlet ones…) Even in the Spears Sisters Era we live in I would say this series is NOT for kids.

ZORRO #1 by Matt Wagner and Francesco Francavilla. The latest revival of the 1919 pulp character begins here! If you liked the Dynamite Entertainment take on the Lone Ranger you need to check this out. From the award-winning creator of GRENDEL.

www.johnjudy.net

Sunday, February 17, 2008

Silver Spring's Adventure House publishes comic strip biography

I ran into the publisher Adventure House at a con last weekend and talked to him for a while. In addition to the stunning Alex Raymond book pictured here, I've been buying his reprints of the Shadow regularly. Both the Shadow and Doc Savage have new material written by pulp historians Anthony Tollin and Will Murray.

Adventure House also has a couple of pulp reprints relating to comic strips - pulp version of Tailspin Tommy #2 from January 1937 and Don Winslow of the Navy #2 from May 1937. I'm a big fan of comics novelizations, even though they're frequently so-so, and was quite please to be able to buy these. I bought this too - Uncovered: The Hidden Art of the Girlie Pulps - on sale for half-price!

Elk's Run interview

Elk's Run was edited by Arlington's Jason Rodriguez - here's a discussion of the book and an interview with the author from Comicon's The Pulse 02-14-2008 "FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION: Elk’s Run," by CHRIS BECKETT.

Zadzooks on Spider-Man's silly retcon

"Awesome art can't save Spider-Man from story," By Joseph Szadkowski, Washington Times, February 16, 2008. For those who don't read Spider-Man - the devil offered to save Aunt May's life in exchange for Spidey and Mary Jane's marriage - and they took the deal. Hah!

Drew Friedman artwork in Sunday's Post


The Style & Arts section, apparently flush with money after being merged, hired cartoonist and caricaturist Drew Friedman to do a color page for their Oscars coverage. Friedman's appeared in Heavy Metal, Entertainment Weekly and has two books on Jewish Comedians out from Fantagraphics now.

The Incredible Mr. Poe exhibit - new opening date

The Incredible Mr. Poe: Edgar Allan Poe in the Comics
An Exhibition


In 1941, Russian immigrant Albert Lewis Kanter tried to introduce young people in the United States to fine literature by incorporating the classics into something they were already reading—comic books. In 1944, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” appeared in Kanter’s Classic Comics series, and ever since adaptations of both Poe and his works have been regular features in comic books and graphic novels, many of which will be on display April 24 to October 31 at the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond (www.poemuseum.org). Poe has even appeared as a comics hero himself alongside Batman and Scooby Doo.

M. Thomas Inge, Blackwell Professor of Humanities at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, and Poe Foundation trustee, has studied comic art for over forty years and published several books on the subject. His collection of comic books from childhood will form the core of the upcoming exhibition which is curated by Richmond artist Chris Semtner.

Also featured will be original artwork by such comic artists and illustrators as Rick Geary, Richard Corben, Gahan Wilson, Gris Grimly, Bill Griffith, and Patrick McDonnell, as well as proof sheets and original pages for some of the Classics Illustrated and other comic book versions loaned by collector Jim Vacca of Boulder, Colorado. An illustrated book and catalog will be available for purchase from the Museum Gift Shop with proceeds going to the Museum.

This will be the first exhibition ever devoted to the comic books and graphic narratives that have helped keep Poe’s name and works in the public eye for over sixty years. An opening reception will be held Thursday evening April 24, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m., with an Unhappy Hour, food, and music, free and open to the public. The Edgar Allan Poe Museum is located at 1914 East Main Street, Richmond, Virginia 23223, phone 804 648-5523. For more information contact Rebecca Jones at becca@poemuseum.org or call toll free 888 21EAPOE.

Saturday, February 16, 2008

George of the Jungle in the Post on Sunday and Tuesday

The new animated George of the Jungle is the topic of "Back in The Swing: George's Jungle Hijinks Evolve for a New Generation," by Kathy Blumenstock, Washington Post Staff Writer, Sunday, February 17, 2008 in the TV week section.

Jay Ward's daughter Tiffany is interviewed about the new show and her father and will be answering questions Tuesday, Feb 19 at 1 pm on www.washingtonpost.com

Friday, February 15, 2008

Carl Barks exhibit at Geppi's Entertainment Museum

The Scoop newsletter's article Carl Barks in the Spotlight at GEM: "Scrooged!" has more detail on the new exhibit in Baltimore.

Feb 15-17 Anime in town

According to "All Fired Up for Anime," by Ellen McCarthy, Washington Post Staff Writer, Friday, February 15, 2008; Page WE33, there's a lot of anime in town this weekend. Once can go to:

ANIME AT THE KENNEDY CENTER Genius Party premieres, Friday and Saturday at 7:30. $25. Three-movie marathon, Sunday, with films at 11, 1:15 and 3:30. $15 each. 2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600. http://www.kennedy-center.org

KATSUCON Friday-Sunday. Omni Shoreham, 2500 Calvert St. NW. Friday $25, Saturday $35, Sunday $20, three-day pass $50. No advance registration required. For a full schedule, visit http://www.katsucon.com.

More details on the Kennedy Center events can be found in yesterday's Express - "Welcome To Japan: 'Culture + Hyperculture'" by Christopher Correa, Express, February 14, 2008.

Thursday, February 14, 2008

OT: Michael Barson on Love Comics

Recently my editor at the University Press of Mississippi tracked down Mike Barson so I could ask permission to use his 1984 interview with Harvey Pekar from Heavy Metal. I called Mr. Barson yesterday and had an enjoyable conversation with him about interviewing Harvey and his other work for Heavy Metal. He's been doing books on ephemera - most are available on Amazon - and today I saw this article on EW.com - "Boy loves girl, girl loves boy and other fables from the Golden Age of Love Comics," by Michael Barson. Check it out.

Wednesday, February 13, 2008

Comics articles in local media

"Undercover Brother: 'Incognegro'" by Darona Williams on February 13, 2008 is online at the Express website, but isn't in the paper.

Meanwhile the Capitol Hill paper has Mike Canning on Persepolis - "A most animated tale, but no cartoon," Hillrag (February 2008): 78.

Tuesday, February 12, 2008

Finding back issues of comics in DC UPDATED

A reader (!) wrote in asking for recommendations about back issue stores in the area. Here's an edited version of my replay and suggestions are welcome -

Very few back issue stores left - there's one in Vienna, VA - which is not the Big Planet Comics store there. According to Randy T in the comments, it's EG Comics, which is not on this this Google search, but is on Maple Ave in one of the strip malls. Aside from that - Barbarian Books in Wheaton - call first as they have odd hours and are closed on Monday I think, although they are close to a Metro. Maybe the closest.

Obviously I'm a fan of Big Planet - I go to the Bethesda store - but they're all good and they all have almost no back issues now (except for College Park - see Joel Pollack's comment below). Another good store is Fantom Comics in Tenleytown and Union Station, both locations right outside the metro. No back issues, or not many, though.

Most back issues turn up at the two local cons - the Capital Associates one is bigger and had a good selection of back issues when I was at it last Sunday.

OT: The philosophical implications of Captain America

I was in a Borders recently with our man RT*, and saw the British magazine to the right and immediately scooped it up and rushed to the cash register. "Popular Culture and Philosophy" - who could resist? Inside is Major Todd A Burkhardt's article "Operation Rebirth: Captain America and the ethics of enhancement,"
Philosophy Now (November / December 2007). Major Burkhardt, who teaches at West Point according to his bio blurb, asks, "...What would be the moral ramifications of creating a real Captain America? Is the intentional creation of super-soldiers by cell engineering morally permissible?"

After a review of the concepts of freedom and supreme evil, Burkhardt concludes that the creation of a super-soldier was moral for 1940. He leaves aside the issue of whether it would be today.

*Richard Thompson, cartoonist and bon vivant

Monday, February 11, 2008

Ann Telnaes interview on gender bias in editorial cartons

Ann Telnaes was interviewed for the story that appeared in the paper - "Drawing the line: Editorial cartoonists confront issues of sexism and racism when caricaturing the Democratic front-runners," by Pam Platt, Louisville, KY Courier-Journal February 10, 2008, but Ms. Platt also posted the interviews she did on their website.

And a tip of the hat to Alan Gardner's Daily Cartoonist blog for one of the links.

Mike Imboden's Fist of Justice

Frederick, Maryland's Mike Imboden and his Fist of Justice comic book is profiled in "Frederick Writer Creates Comic Book Hero," Associated Press February 11, 2008. I picked up a couple of his books at a con late last year - he does some nice parody covers of early Marvel books.

Sunday, February 10, 2008

Government Comics on Internet Archive

A search for 'comic book' at the Internet Archive produces pdfs of some US Government comic book giveaways including Mr. Civil Defense Tells About Natural Disasters which has a Li'l Abner cover and Smash-Up at Big Rock with art by Mark Trail's Ed Dodd. There's also a Jack Chick and a Klan comic. I guess there are still some government giveaway comics although the only one coming to mind at the moment is PS Magazine - now with Joe Kubert artwork.

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 02-13-08

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 02-13-08
By John Judy

Remember: Nothing says “Happy Valentine’s Day” like an armload of comics! Right, honey? Honey…?

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #550 by Marc Guggenheim and Salvador Larroca. Jackpot! Menace! And maybe some more new characters with so-so names. It’s no “Doctor Octopus” is all I’m saying.

ASTRO CITY: THE DARK AGE SPECIAL #2 BEAUTIE by Kurt Busiek and Brent Anderson. The secret origin of Astro City’s own living doll, Beautie! We’ve been waiting years for this and so has she! Recommended!

BAT LASH #3 of 6 by Peter Brandvold, Sergio Aragones and John Severin. Necktie Party! How’s ol’ Bat gonna git outta this one?! Owl-hoots beware!

BLACK PANTHER #34 by Reginald Hudlin and Cafu. Featuring Skrull gangsters and frogs.

BOOSTER GOLD #0 by Geoff Johns, Jeff Katz, and Dan Jurgens. It’s official: This is the latest-shipping title ever!!! Ladies and Gentlemen: the Booster Gold/Zero Hour cross-over! In your face, Kevin Smith! Eat it, Ultimate Hulk/Wolverine #3! Miracleman #25? 1963 Annual? All is forgiven. You can come out now… Please?

BPRD: 1946 #2 of 5 by Mike Mignola, Joshua Dysart, and Paul Azaceta. Professor Bruttenholm teams up with the Russkies to find out what’s up with Project Vampir Sturm. Creepy Horrific hi-jinks from the House of Hellboy!

CAPTAIN MARVEL #3 of 5 by Brian Reed and Lee Weeks. Paintings and Skrulls.

DMZ #28 by Brian Wood and Riccardo Burchielli. The secret origin of Soames, New York’s most infamous eco-warrior!

DOOM PATROL ARCHIVES VOL. 4 HC by Arnold Drake and Bruno Premiani. Collecting issues #106-113 of “the strangest super-team of all.” No, the other one. Silver-Age, dinosaur-punching fun! Recommended.

FANTASTIC FOUR #554 by Mark Millar and Bryan Hitch. A new team and a new look for The World’s Greatest Comic Magazine! Very ultimate-y without feeling as wholly detached from the rich details of the mainstream Marvel Yoo. Recommended.

GHOST RIDER #20 by Jason Aaron and Roland Boschi. Okay, I know it’s Ghost Rider which is usually a title on par with its movie adaptation. However, this new arc is being written by the guy who writes SCALPED and SCALPED is completely awesome. That alone gets this issue a read. A very hopeful read….

GOON #21 written and illustrated by Eric Powell. The Priest’s unearthly kin would like a word with him.

NEW AVENGERS #38 by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos. Jessica Jones turns herself in to The Law to protect her baby. Very “Juno” if “Juno” was a noir super-hero story without all the chipper pseudo-Canadian accents and West Wing-y banter. Okay, it’s Bendis so the banter is there. No getting around the banter. Sorry.

NEXT ISSUE PROJECT #1: FANTASTIC COMICS #24 by Many Twisted People. Okay, Booster and Company are off the hook. This one is the Latest Comic Ever by about 66 years. The last issue of FANTASTIC COMICS was on the stands in November of 1941. A little thing called “copyright expiration” kicked in and now anyone who wants to can publish all the characters contained therein, no harm, no foul. So brace yourself for a golden-age sized delight containing the new adventures of Samson, Stardust, Flip Falcon, Sub Saunders, Yank Wilson, and more! Marvel’s got THE TWELVE. Dynamite’s got that Alex Ross thing. Now it’s Image’s turn at bat, Gotta look!

SHOWCASE PRESENTS: ENEMY ACE, VOL. 1 SC by Robert Kanigher, Joe Kubert, John Severin, Howard Chaykin, Neal Adams, and wow, how do you even follow that? A must for fans of great comics, “war” or otherwise.

SUPERMAN #673 by Kurt Busiek and Peter Vale. Superman fights Insect Queen on the moon! And he’s got a bug’s head on the cover! What more can one ask?

WALKING DEAD #46 by Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard. Oh man, I hope they didn’t really kill Michonne last issue…. Not for kids. Must have.

WILL EISNER’S SPIRIT ARCHIVES VOL.24 HC written and drawn by Will Eisner. The final volume of Eisner’s most famous creation, collecting the weekly Spirit adventures up through the early 1950s. The cover art alone is worth it. Recommended with awe.

WOLVERINE #62 by Jason Aaron and Ron Garney. Best Wolvie story in quite a while from the author of SCALPED. Featuring Mystique and a seriously ruthless Scott Summers. It’s like he grew up on a reservation or something… Recommended.

WONDER WOMAN #17 by Gail Simone and Terry & Rachel Dodson. WW vs. evil Amazons and Nazis. Classic stuff, beautifully drawn and on time!

X-FACTOR #28 by Peter David and Pablo Raimondi. Finally free from the last Big X-Over, we learn who Madrox knocked up and what’s happening around Mutant-Town. Helpful x-slang to learn: “PAN = Pass As Normal. REM = You still have your horns, tentacles, weird brow ridges, but no friggin’ powers.” It’ll be on the test.

X-FORCE #1 of 6 by Christopher Yost and Clayton Crain. Wolverine, Warpath, Wolfsbane, and the Wolverine Tranny-Clone X-23. Cyclops has assembled a mutant murder squad to kill anyone he doesn’t like. Because that’s what heroes do. Do protect Freedom or something. Comes without poly-bags, trading cards, or a bucket. But it does have those highly collectable variant covers!

www.johnjudy.net

Saturday, February 09, 2008

April 25: The Incredible Mr. Poe: Edgar Allan Poe in the Comics

A new exhibit curated by long-time comics scholar Tom Inge will open in Richmond in the spring.

The Incredible Mr. Poe: Edgar Allan Poe in the Comics
An Exhibition

In 1941, Russian immigrant Albert Lewis Kanter tried to introduce young people in the United States to fine literature by incorporating the classics into something they were already reading—comic books. In 1944, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” appeared in Kanter’s Classic Comics series, and ever since adaptations of both Poe and his works have been regular features in comic books and graphic novels, many of which will be on display April 25 to October 31 at the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond (www.poemuseum.org). Poe has even appeared as a comics hero himself alongside Batman and Scooby Doo.

M. Thomas Inge, Blackwell Professor of Humanities at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, and Poe Foundation trustee, has studied comic art for over forty years and published several books on the subject. His collection of comic books from childhood will form the core of the upcoming exhibition which is curated by Richmond artist Chris Semtner.

Also featured will be original artwork by such comic artists and illustrators as Rick Geary, Richard Corben, Gahan Wilson, Gris Grimly, Bill Griffith, and Patrick McDonnell, as well as proof sheets and original pages for some of the Classics Illustrated and other comic book versions loaned by collector Jim Vacca of Boulder, Colorado. An illustrated book and catalog will be available for purchase from the Museum Gift Shop with proceeds going to the Museum.

This will be the first exhibition ever devoted to the comic books and graphic narratives that have helped keep Poe’s name and works in the public eye for over sixty years. An opening reception will be held Friday evening April 25, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m., and there will also be an introductory lecture. All events are open to the public. The Edgar Allan Poe Museum is located at 1914 East Main Street, Richmond, Virginia 23223, phone 804 648-5523. For more information contact Rebecca Jones at becca@poemuseum.org or call toll free 888 21EAPOE.

Zadzooks is Harvey Birdman videogame review

Voila - "Harvey Birdman tans, gets smiles amid justice," By Joseph Szadkowski, Washington Times, February 9, 2008. Nah, I don't really care either.

Wednesday, February 06, 2008

Bruce Guthrie's pictures of Clarendon's Mardi Gras Parade and the Richard Thompson float

Bruce Guthrie has a photoset of pre-Mardi Gras hijinks at the BonoTom Studio where the Richard Thompson-inspired
float for Clarendon's Mardi Gras parade was designed and built and then pictures of the float in action.


We can all get along!



Richard and I look on in stunned amazement.


Bonotom Studio made the buildings and everything.

Feb 10 Comic convention this weekend

Capital Associates - Dunn Loring Fire Dept, Tysons Coverner, VA, 2148 Gallows Road. $3.00, 10am-3 pm - www.capicons.com for information.

Special guest - Pop Mhan

Feb 7-17: Anime and manga at Kennedy Center

Repost!

From their website:
Manga & Anime

Manga is a sequential narrative Japanese comic. Anime is a unique animation style developed in Japan. Both are now internationally recognized forms of literary and visual art. Manga is one of the fastest growing segments of U.S. books—and anime films have gained a rapidly expanding fan base across the nation.

Manga Café and Reading Lounge

Enjoy a bite to eat while reading VIZ Media mangas, watching anime trailers, and viewing vintage robot toys. Manga author Robin Nishi will capture festival happenings in a daily drawing and conduct a free workshop.

* Feb 7 - 17, 2008
* South Gallery

Genius Party Premieres

Don't miss this unprecedented series of original films by Japan's top anime talents, who were each selected by Director and Genius Party Executive Producer Eiko Tanaka to create their dream projects.

* Feb 15 - 16, 2008
* Family Theater
* $25.00

Marathon of Anime Premieres

Don't miss this screening marathon featuring three new anime features: 5 Centimeters Per Second, The Piano Forest, and Appleseed: Ex Machina.

* Feb 17, 2008
* Family Theater
* $15.00

Arlington's Steve Conley draws Star Trek


Arlington's Steve Conley is drawing Star Trek for IDW's Star Trek Year Four. They're up to six issues so far - Steve seems to be drawing about every other one and is doing some covers as well. The comic is based on the animated tv series, and has been good so far. Steve's name may be familiar from organizing the Small Press Expo, or his fun web comic / comic book Astounding Space Thrills.

Post on comic strip collective action

The Post has picked up on the February 10th collective protest by cartoonists of a darker shade of pale - "Cartoonists to Protest Lack of Color in the Comics," by Teresa Wiltz, Washington Post Staff Writer, Wednesday, February 6, 2008; C01. The protest is largely the idea of local cartoonist Corey Thomas who does 'Watch Your Head.'

I'm afraid I agree with the opinions that Gene Weingarten expressed in his chat update today, although I like Baldo and La Cucaracha well enough. Boondocks' McGruder's comments in the initial article are interesting too - unfortunately I don't think a lot of the college cartoonists are able to sustain their strip. I was a fan of Watch Your Head when the Post tried it out, but it's become a real one-note strip.

Chatalogical Humor by Gene Weingarten, Washington Post Staff Writer, Tuesday, February 5, 2008; 12:00 PM

Gene Weingarten: Here's an interesting piece in today's Style section, about a planned protest by cartoonists-of-color.

I sympathize with these guys, and many of them produce good strips that are victims of a de facto quota system. But there's a difficult truth that undercuts their argument. In devastating economic times, newspapers are (unwisely, I believe) ruthlessly squeezing the life out of their comics pages. So there is plenty of pandering going on in all directions -- a naked, desperate effort to appeal to every possible perceived constituency -- and that has nothing to do with racism. With limited space, there are quotas for everything. Believe me, the only reason newspapers run the painfully bad Prickly City is that they feel they need to offer a conservative voice on the page, to counterbalance the lefty Doonesbury, Candorville Nonsequitur, etc. The only reason newspapers run Dennis the Menace and Beetle Bailey and Classic Peanuts is to appeal to the oldsters who they believe would feel lost without these mild, mealy things. Family Circus is for very, very young readers, and preposterously stupid adults, and lovers of camp humor. This appeal-to-all-demographics impulse leaves very little room for ANYONE to break into a newspaper.

There is another factor undercutting their argument: For some, the despicable quota system has worked splendidly. The only reason The Post runs the weak Baldo is that the pandering alternative is the weaker La Cucaracha.

It's a pretty bad situation all around.

Monday, February 04, 2008

Chabon endorses Obama

Chabon endorses Obama in "Obama vs. the Phobocracy," by Michael Chabon, Washington Post.com Monday, February 4, 2008; 12:00 AM. Chabon of course wrote The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay about an early comic book-creating duo. He lives in Maryland and is well worth reading as he works his way through reinvigorating literature via genre conventions.

Does anyone know if this appeared actually in the paper? I can't find it in mine.

John Kascht caricature videos on Wash Post site?

Did anyone know about these? I certainly didn't until the Journalista blog from Seattle pointed them out. There's seven up now - Obama, Clinton, Edwards, McCain, Guliani, Huckabee and Romney - each is slightly over 3 minutes.

More Berryman exhibit coverage

The Clifford Berryman exhibit that is opening later this week at the National Archives continues to generate press. You can see my post about the exhibit here.

And the previously mentioned article in the Washington Post:
"Caricaturing Campaigns: Exhibit of Cartoonist's Sketches Links Politics Then and Now," by Michael E. Ruane, Washington Post Sunday, February 3, 2008; C03.

and this one that snuck by me until today, "National Archives unveils political cartoons," By Johanna Neuman, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer, January 31, 2008.

Jennifer Rios of the Scripps Howard Foundation Wire wrote one too "After 60 years, political cartoons in exhibit remain relevant," - you can register for free to view it, or see it here.

Feb 5: Mardi Gras with Richard Thompson's imagination

Richard drew this sketch for a King Kong - Godzilla float for Clarendon's Mardi Gras parade, and it ready to roll. You can see his blog for more details (link at right), but be there on Tues eve at 8 pm to see the real thing.

Feb 28: Xxxholic and Tsubasa Chronicle Movies to be Screened at the JICC downtown


Xxxholic and Tsubasa Chronicle Movies to be Screened at the Japan Information and Culture Center, Embassy of Japan.

The Japan Information and Culture Center Embassy of Japan and DC Anime Club proudly present the screening of xxxholic and Tsubasa Chronicle Movies on Thursday Febuary 28, 2008 at 6:30 pm at the Japan Information and Culture Center Embassy of Japan 1155 21st Street, NW Washington, DC 20036-3308.

About xxxholic The Movie:

In the film, Yūko receives a request from a woman to help her back into her mansion which for some reason does not allow her to enter. Yūko says since Watanuki was the one who brought the client to her, Watanuki should be the one to grant her wish, and therefore brought along. Dōmeki is also brought along to help and Yūko attends not only to grant her client's wish but also because she is invited to the mansion where many famous collectors were also invited with the same letter. Inside the mansion are strange rooms and mysterious letters telling its guests what do to in place of a host. Though the collectors think up the theory of a mysterious auction being held like in an urban legend, it becomes apparent that something more sinister and mysterious going on. One after another, each collector disappears and a number of other strange occurrences happen during the night. The real reasons behind the invitations must be discovered in order for Yūko and company to get to the bottom of this mystery.
60Minutes

About Tsbussa Chronicles The Movie: In their continuing journey to find the feathers that are the fragments of Sakura's lost memory, Syaoran, Kurogane, Fay, and Sakura move through time and space with Mokona. Here, they visit the "Country of Birdcages," a seemingly peaceful country where people and birds live together, each person having a bird companion. After a boy named Koruri confuses Syaoran and Sakura for "bodyguards" and attacks them, they learn that the king of the country possesses a mysterious power. Princess Tomoyo, Koruri, and the other oppressed citizens, having had their birds taken from them, live in hiding within the forest. In order to take back Sakura's feather, Syaoran and the others stand up against the scheming king.
35Minutes

Both Movies are based upon the Manga by Clamp.

Both Movies will be shown in Japanese with English Subtitles.


This event is free and open to the public. Reservations are required.

RSVP to jiccrsvpwinter08@embjapan.org

Seating is limited and granted on a first come, first served basis.

For more information

please visit the Japanese Information and Culture Center website at

http://www.us.embjapan.go.jp/jicc/ or visit the DC Anime Club website at
http://dcanimeclub.org.



About DC Anime Club:

DCAC was established in 2003 to introduce and educate people in the Washington,DC area about East Asian culture, through viewing and discussion of Japanese animation (also known as anime) and Japanese comics (manga). DCAC is a 501(c)(3) not for profit organization, contributions to DC Anime Club are taxed deductible to the extent allowable under the law.

The club also works to provide a positive, alternative activity to the youth in the area by exposing them to foreign culture, encouraging artistic expression and creativity, and providing opportunities for participation in community activities and leadership.

In addition to our weekly meetings, the club holds an Annual Art Show, an Annual Costume fundraising event, and visits local schools to do presentations
on anime. The club also works with the Smithsonian Freer Gallery and DC Asian Pacific American Film Festival on their anime screenings, and has helped locally promote performances for Japanese bands such as Puffy Ami Yumi and Pine am. DC Anime Club was founded by Chris Wanamaker (President), Jules Chang (Vice President) and Craig Vaughn (Sgt in ARMS) on Saturday June 5, 2003. We have a strong membership that continues to grow -- most of which are teenagers.

About Japan Information and Culture Center:
The Japan Information and Culture Center (JICC) is the cultural and public affairs section of the Embassy of Japan in Washington D.C. Our primary role is to promote better understanding of Japan and Japanese culture by providing a wide range of information,educational services and programs to the public. The JICC is located on the lower level of the glass-enclosed Galleria at Lafayette Centre III in downtown Washington, D.C. Its facilities include a research library, a 152-seat auditorium, and a 1,500-square-foot exhibition gallery where a wide variety of events sponsored by the JICC are hosted throughout the year.

--
Christopher Wanamaker
DC Anime Club President
http://www.dcanimeclub.org
202 262 2083

March 5: Berg lecture on Columbia at LoC

Joseph E. Baker (ca.1837-1914), Columbia Demands Her Children, 1864. Lithograph.

The quick details, and then the longer press release.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Where Have You Gone, Miss Columbia? American Identity and Uncle Sam’s Forgotten Partner: An Illustrated Lecture by Dr. Ellen Berg

SWANN FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP WINNER, 2007-2008


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008, AT 12 NOON
in Dining Room A, Madison Building, 6th Floor

Co-sponsored by the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon and the Prints and Photographs Division, the Library of Congress

Request ADA Accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 TTY or “ADA@loc.gov” For further information, email swann@loc.gov or call Martha Kennedy at (202) 707-9115.

and the press release:

Miss Columbia, Favored National Icon, Featured in Swann Fellow’s Talk on March 5

Swann Foundation Fellow Ellen Berg will discuss depictions of Miss Columbia, her rise in the nineteenth century as a national icon of American ideals and subsequent fading away in the public eye, in a lecture at the Library of Congress on March 5.

Berg will present the lecture titled "Where Have You Gone, Miss Columbia? American Identity and Uncle Sam’s Forgotten Partner,” at noon on Wednesday, March 5, 2008, in Dining Room A on the sixth floor of the James Madison Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, DC.

Berg’s illustrated presentation is based on research conducted at the Library of Congress during her fellowship awarded by the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon. The Library administers the foundation. The lecture, sponsored by the foundation and the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division, is free and open to the public; no reservations are required.

A century ago, two symbols most often represented the United States as national icons: Miss Columbia stood for the ideals of the American people and Uncle Sam for the government. Although featured in hundreds of political cartoons between 1852 and 1952, Columbia, who was widely regarded as an embodiment of “liberty, social justice, and equality,” gradually disappeared as a symbol of our national conscience. Through an examination of representative cartoons, Berg will explore how changing portrayals of Columbia reflect parallel changes in ideas about American identity and feminine nationalism. She will draw upon the Library’s holdings which contain numerous portrayals of Miss Columbia created for a variety of publications and audiences.

Berg is an affiliate assistant professor in the department of history at the University of Maryland. She is also an associate fellow at the Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford, where she was a postdoctoral fellow last year. She received a Ph.D. in American history from the University of California at Berkeley where she completed her dissertation entitled, “Citizens in the Republic of Childhood: Immigrants and the American Kindergarten, 1880-1920.” She is currently revising this dissertation for publication as a book, in addition to extending her research into Columbia’s role in American identity beyond the arena of political cartoons.

This presentation is part of the Swann Foundation’s continuing activities to support the study, interpretation, preservation and appreciation of original works of humorous and satiric art by graphic artists from around the world. The Swann Foundation’s advisory board is composed of scholars, collectors, cartoonists and Library of Congress staff members. The foundation customarily awards one fellowship annually (with a stipend of $15,000) to assist scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. Applications for the academic year 2008-2009 were due on Feb.15, 2008. More information about the fellowship is available through the Swann Foundation’s Web site: www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swannhome
or by emailing swann@loc.gov.

Sunday, February 03, 2008

OT: Call for Papers: Reading between the panels

This one's not about Washington, DC comics, but in the spirit of Team Comics and fostering study, I'm posting it at Dr. Collins' request.

Call for Papers: Reading between the panels

Edited by:
Can Yalcinkaya – canyalcinkaya@yahoo.com
Dr Steve Collins – scollins@scmp.mq.edu.au

Comic books have been often treated deridingly as a hybrid of art and literature, but ultimately a product of low culture. Works by artists, writers and scholars including Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, Art Spiegelman, Frank Miller, Scott McCloud, Will Brooker and Danny Fingeroth have forced a reappraisal of the space occupied by comic books. Over the last two decades comic book stories have diverged from hero-centric mythologies to more broadly explore areas such as the full gamut of the human psyche, sexuality, and politics. Beyond the stories themselves, the comic industry and economy has expanded to encompass underground, adult and alternative productions as well lucrative movie adaptations. This issue of Scan Journal invites submission on areas dealing with comic books and graphic novels that include, but are not restricted to:

- Studies of narrative
- Visual aesthetic
- Analysis of specific titles or characters
- Comics and adaptations/derivatives
- Fan fiction
- Comic book histories
- Economics of the comic book industry
- Comics and new media, Web comics, micropayment systems such as Bitpass, digital comics on DVD
- Comic books and intellectual property, for example copyright assignments, the pirate trade in scanned comics

Abstracts should be emailed to the editors by no later than 31st March 2008.

Full articles will adhere to the submission guidelines for Scan Journal and be emailed as a Word document attachment to the editors by Friday 16th May 2008.

Submission guidelines can be found at http://scan.net.au/scan/about/about.html#journal

New Yorker January 28, 2008 comic bits

Capturing the non-gag comics bits in the latest New Yorker -

1/28/08
#Swarte illo for Buying a Cure by Jerome Groopman, p. 39,
#In Calvin Tomkins’ Lifting the Veil, p. 58, artist John Currin says he was inspired to paint Old Master style pornographic paintings by the Danish Islam cartoon controversy, and returns to that point several times.
#Gerald Scarfe caricature of Benjamin Franklin for The Creed by Jill Lepore, p. 79.

Thompson continues to flee west, spotted in Hawaii

Gary Chun's interviewed Richard for "Off-kilter worlds collide: ‘Prickly City’ and ‘Cul de Sac’ debut," Honolulu Star-Bulletin (February 3). Note the original art for the story - collectors should immediately fly to Hawaii to buy a copy of the paper.

And remember, a float based on Richard's sketch will be appearing in Clarendon's Mardi Gras Parade on Tuesday at 8 pm. Richard will be there and may be drawing permanent King Kong tattoos. Or he may not.

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 02-06-08

QUICK REVIEWS FOR COMICS DUE 02-06-08
(Super-Wednesday!)
by John Judy

ABE SAPIEN: THE DROWNING #1 of 5 by Mike Mignola and Jason Shawn Alexander. The first solo adventure of Hellboy’s Pal: Abe Sapien! Looks beautiful.

THE BAKERS: BABIES AND KITTENS HC written and illustrated by Kyle Baker, the Greatest Cartoonist of All Time. Two cats are adopted into Kyle’s home against his wishes. Hijinks ensue. Beautifully drawn hijinks. Recommended.

BATMAN: FALSE FACES HC by Brian K. Vaughan and Many Talented Folks. Collecting the Bat-stories by the creator of Y THE LAST MAN and RUNAWAYS so you should probably knock down old people to get to this one. Or just do it for fun.

BIGGLES RECOUNTS THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN GN by Asso, Rideau, Chauvin, and Uderzo. A graphic recounting of some unpleasantness 68 years gone by the folks who brought you last year’s BIGGLES RECOUNTS THE FALKLAND ISLANDS WAR. Pip-pip!

BOYS #15 by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson. Wee Hughie visits The Legend to learn more about his partners. And poor little Starlight learns more about hers. NOT for kids EVER, but recommended.

BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER #15 by Joss Whedon and Georges Jeanty. A done-in-one issue about girls gone bad and things of this nature. Enjoy!

CLANDESTINE #1 of 5 written and drawn by Alan Davis. An ancient race of hidden super-humans faces exposure after one of the kids goes and starts fighting crime! Stupid kid… Alan Davis always draws purty.

DETECTIVE COMICS #841 by Paul Dini and Dustin Ngyuyen. Featuring an insane cover and a fight with the new Ventriloquist!

DOKTOR SLEEPLESS #5 by Warren Ellis and Ivan Rodriguez. Mysteries unfold, sub-cultures collide, and creepy ambiguities get creepier. Or as Warren Ellis calls it: “Wednesday.”

INCOGNEGRO HC by Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece. Part-Mystery, Part-History describes this story of a light-skinned Northern black man passing for white (“going incognegro”) to investigate his brother’s arrest in the virulently racist Mississippi of early 20th century America. This already sound like a movie. Gotta look!

JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA #12 by Geoff Johns, Alex Ross, and Dale Eaglesham. The new heroes and the old continue to gather as the KINGDOM COME Superman meets the legacy heroes of the Golden Age. A trivia smorgasboard with Ross covers!

KRAZY & IGNATZ: 1941-1942 RAGOUT OF RASPBERRIES SC by George Herriman. Fantagraphics does it again! This is the third volume of their reprint series collecting all the KRAZY KAT Sunday strips in full color. Includes an essay by critic Jeet Heer. Recommended.

NORTHLANDERS #3 by Brian Wood and Davide Gianfelice. Prince Sven the Viking gets busy with scheming, fighting, and all kinds of swordplay. This one’s becoming appointment reading. Highly recommended.

SCALPED #14 by Jason Aaron and R.M. Guera. Just when Agent Dash Bad Horse figures life on the Rez can’t get any worse somebody kills and scalps his mom. This ain’t “Billy Jack”, kids. Highly recommended.

SCALPED VOL. 2: CASINO BOOGIE SC by Jason Aaron and R.M. Guera. Your second remedial textbook if you’re just discovering THE BEST DARN COMIC EVER!!! “In your face, Watchmen!”

SUPERMAN/BATMAN SERIES 5 ACTION FIGURES including The Joker/Mr. Mxyzptlk 2-Pack, Power Girl, Supergirl, and “Green Super-Batman!” Based on the designs of Ed McGuinness.

TEEN TITANS YEAR ONE #2 of 6 by Amy Wolfram and Karl Kerschl. Aqualad must face his fears as the mentor heroes go nuts. Why must they always do that?

THE TWELVE #2 of 12 by J. Michael Straczynski and Chris Weston. Okay, let’s make it “The Eleven.” This appears to be the series about Golden-Age heroes in the modern world that’s doing it right. Great characterization, great art, the works. Unlike certain other “Projects” out there…

UNCANNY X-MEN #495 by Ed Brubaker and Michael Choi. Normally the X-Men go to the Savage Land when they (and their writers) need a vacation. Brubaker, however, makes it work. And Choi draws a mean Whateversaurus. No Space Opera. No Time Travel. No Mutant Jesus Baby. Recommended.

www.johnjudy.net

Good Berryman article in Post

This article is good and has a bit more history on Berryman that I put in my earlier blog post. See "Caricaturing Campaigns: Exhibit of Cartoonist's Sketches Links Politics Then and Now," by Michael E. Ruane, Washington Post Sunday, February 3, 2008; C03.

Another Tom Toles letter

Overlooked Again
Washington Post (February 2, 2008): A13
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/01/AR2008020103008_3.html

Shame on Tom Toles for excluding Ron Paul from his humorous Jan. 24 "2008 Candidate Guide" and shame on The Post for letting him get away with it.

How could you regard Fred Thompson, who had dropped out, and Mike Huckabee as serious candidates but not Ron Paul, a Republican who has raised a lot of money and has many sincere, hardworking supporters? He is the only candidate who promises a genuine change in the death spiral of American politics.

Regardless of how you regard Paul's prospects, he deserved to be treated with the same disrespect as the other candidates in a political cartoon.

-- Gene Fellner

Saturday, February 02, 2008

SHOC: Ads from Liberty Magazine

A few scans of Liberty Magazine wandered my way lately, so I pulled some comics material out of them. First we have 3 comic strip ads of Ol' Judge Robbins for Prince Albert tobacco. The artist changes, but I can't tell who any of them are.

Liberty Magazine November 11, 1936

Liberty Magazine October 2, 1937

Liberty Magazine June 10, 1939. This issue has an unfortunate editorial about how there will be no war in Europe in 1939. Whoops.

This ad agency obviously thought Ripley had a good idea, so why not borrow it?
Liberty Magazine November 14, 1936

And this ad is the one that made me decide to put these up for the Secret History of Comics - Fontaine Fox's long-running Toonerville Folks / Trolley (1911-1955) advertising laxatives.
Liberty Magazine, Jun 10, 1939

Matt Wuerker's Updates from the Toon o Sphere


Politico staff cartoonist Matt Wuerker did a couple of comics-referential cartoons lately. Here's the January 24th one that he emailed me - can you name all the original characters and the candidate being satirized?

The January 31st one isn't online yet, but is good too.

Comics of the Day blog rates the Post's comics

Richard Thompson sent over this link to the Comics of the Day blog- I'd say he's worried about appearing on it, but we all know the Post doesn't run the daily Cul de Sac! Actually as I look at the site more closely he's got a positive 3 rating - tied with Pickles. Better try harder, Richard.

Friday, February 01, 2008

Richard Thompson takes Utah

Here's an interview - "Cartoonist bringing popular 'Cul de Sac' family to Utah," By Dennis Lythgoe, Deseret Morning News, Feb. 1, 2008. I know we'll miss him here in Arlington. It seems like a sudden move, but I guess on reflection that I could see those Mormon tendencies.

Feb 5: Thompson's Mardi Gras float

Richard drew this sketch for a King Kong - Godzilla float for Clarendon's Mardi Gras parade, and it's being built. You can see his blog for more details (link at right), but be there on Tues eve at 8 pm to see the real thing.

Secret History of Comics courtesy of Warren Bernard

Here's another article by Warren Bernard on comic art in unlikely places:

SHOC Part 1,235,641

CROSBYFOOTBALL

For this next installment of The Secret History Of Comics, here is a nice piece by Percy Crosby. This is from a football program for the October, 1935 game held between Navy and Notre Dame. Being close to Annapolis, Crosby did a few covers for their football games.

Now, he was not the only famous cartoonist to do college football program covers - Willard Mullin, The Dean of Sports Cartoonists did a lot, but did you know know that such luminaries of the cartoon field such as Ellison Hoover, John Held Jr., James Thurber and Milton Caniff all did football programs?

The length and breadth of the cartoonist contribution to the football program field would not have occurred if not for the efforts of Andy Moursund. His methodical and exhaustive research into the field of college football programs has turned this information up. I recommend going to his site to see the length and breath of the cartoon and illustration world that exists in the college football program arena. His site is now in browse/test mode, but soon you will be able to order poster reproductions of any of the program covers he has online.

Needless to say, some great unknown cartoonists and illustrators did work on these covers, and its a shame that no one, save Andy, has bothered to gather them up. No question, Andy has a great resource that hopefully will be a springboard for a more thorough treatment of the subject.

scan0006
Now, to make things even more interesting, inside a lot of the programs were specialty cartoons and ads by cartoonists that appear nowhere else. The Crosby program has cartoons by Johann Bull and E. Simms Campbell as well as the ad you see here by James Thurber.

How many ads/cartoons are there buried in these programs? How much of comic history lies undiscovered in these programs? What does this type of work tell us about the length and breath of the work these cartoonists did and their impact on popular culture?

The SHOC series will never end.

Swann fellowship applications due in two weeks

Swann fellowship applications are due very soon, Friday, February 15, 2008. One of the few fellowships in the field, this $15,000 award supports scholarly research in caricature and cartoon. Applicants must be enrolled in an M.A. or Ph.D program in a university in the U.S., Canada, or Mexico. Access guidelines and application at:

http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/swann-fellow.html

Email swann@loc.gov or call 202/707-9115 with questions.